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Best words of advice for a GEOS interview?
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Hanzo



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2005 12:49 am    Post subject: Best words of advice for a GEOS interview? Reply with quote

Hi everybody, newbie here - please be nice!

Whats the best bit of advice you could give me for my mammoth 3 day interview with GEOS next week?

I know its down to what happens on the day but after not getting into JET (which was a sad end to a gruesome wait!) and not particularly wanting to work for NOVA (I have an interview with them coming up too -- last resort), I really want to make a good impression at GEOS, to maximise my chances.

Advice to stick it out for 3 days and maybe land the job?

Thanks in advance guys, I know there's a wealthy amount of knowledge floating around these boards.
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hivans



Joined: 29 Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Location: fukuoka

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2005 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a GEOS interview two years ago, and was offered a job but in the end I had to turn down their offer for various reasons. I think there have been many previous posts on this subject but I can add a little bit from my own experience.

There was a brief grammar test - I did not think it was too hard but if you have a week it might be worth brushing up your grammar knowledge - I think the questions I had were on identifying various tenses such as simple past and present perfect but I am sure the questions will change with each interview.

There was quite a few sessions devouted to company information and discussing it. I am sure it is better to take an interest in these sessions and ask some intelligent questions.

A lot of time was spent on the GEOS teaching method, culminating in a 30 minute lesson demonstration. It may have changed since I took it, but I think the recruiters were looking for " a show not tell" approach and having a lot of student talking time. They will take you through each stage of a typical GEOS lesson, so you will get plenty of pointers and tips.

Also, I think I was asked to right something about the "Business of Education" - I suspect they might want canidates to understand that it is not a public school and there will be a business side to the job as well as just teaching.

I attended a recruitment session at their London office, and I have to say that the recruiters were very pleasant and helpful people. I got the impression that they wanted people to get through - and our group worked quite well as we were not competing for a fixed number of jobs. I actually enjoyed the weekend.

There are a huge number of threads here about working for conversation schools in Japan. In the end, each person has to decide what works for them. However, if you had set your heart on JET, I do wonder if the conversation school would be perfect for you. Inevitably, as an English teacher working in an "English oasis" it may be difficult (but not impossible) to learn as much about Japanese culture and language as you would wish. If I had my time again, I think I might look at working for someone like Alita Central teaching in a state school (although you will see many posts here from people who have had problems with dispatch companies).

I know it must have been a disappointment not to get into JET, but as GEOS, NOVA, AEON and others recruit year round, why don`t you take a bit of time looking at the available options and seeing what will best match your personal goals for coming to Japan? Is there a danger that you could rush into a conversation school job "on the rebound"? This web site has a lot of information on your options. At the GEOS interview, they were careful not to pressure someone into acceptance. So, if you were offered the job and did not take it now, you would be still be able to apply again in the future.

Anyway, just a thought, but good luck!
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Hanzo



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2005 6:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your words of wisdom hivans, i've been looking around and looking at my options reading about different ways of getting to Japan. Of course i'm upset about not getting JET but I wanted to get to Japan anyway and GEOS is a way to get there, so to speak.

The reason i'm going for the big schools is quite simple, I am a fresh university graduate (last summer) with no teaching experience..and these are the only guys who will take me (sorting the visa out, etc.) If I do get to Japan, i'll atleast be able to continue my job search and hopefully get a better deal, but who knows if that'll happen.

I'd like to ask you hivans (and anyone else): on day 1 of the interview, it says you do a grammar test/quiz (like you explained above) and a 1-on-1 teaching demonstration which is supposed to last 5 minutes, what is the teaching demonstration about and what are you expected to do? Any advice on that?

Thanks again..
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2005 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is what others have written about the GEOS interview.

First experience
I originally came over to Japan with GEOS and went through their 3-day process, however, that was more than seven years ago so I'll give you the basic gist as I remember it- it may have changed since my days.

DAY 1- Usually the shortest of the three. A couple hours long with a series of different interviews with different people- both individually and in groups. In my opinion this is basically a personality test- they just want to see if you've got the right attitude for them. However, I do remember taking a short test of grammar and international trivia, but basically if they like ya, they'll invite you back for the next day's "interview".

DAY 2- If you got invited back, this will be a FULL DAY of GEOS indoctrination- the company, the business side, the methodology materials, etc... etc... If I remember correctly it will include a lot of activities, more "interviews", etc. Again this day they're still trying to weed people out.

DAY 3- Again by invite only, at the end of day 2 you'll probably be asked to plan a lesson and then "teach" it to a "student" on this day. If you make it through, they'll extend a provisional offer of employment.

That's basically it as I remember it. Others may have gone through this process more recently and are welcome to correct or add to anything I may have forgotten or glossed over.

Although it sounds like a lot but it's really not that daunting. As with any job process, if you go in looking professional (wear a suit and tie), acting professional, use some common sense and display the right type of personality you shouldn't have any problems.

I had ABSOLUTELY no teaching experience or qualifications prior to coming to Japan so don't sweat that too much. I think most on this board would agree with me, that attitude and personality can more than make up for the lack of practical, hands-on teaching experience.

On another note- I worked for GEOS for a little over a year before moving on to better things in Japan. Naturally there were things I didn't like, but overall I really had no issues with GEOS. I was fortunate to have a great Japanese manager and fantastic Japanese and western co-workers- makes a HUGE difference. I had friends who worked for GEOS that had horror stories to tell. I guess my point is, whether you go with GEOS, AEON, NOVA, whatever- it'll always be a bit of a crap shoot so good luck.

Another opinion (July, 2003)
Sounds like the process hasn't changed much then: I did the interview a few months ago.
Day 1
Very short intro to Geos and Japan
English grammar and general knowledge test
5 minute teaching demonstration
More Geos info

Day 2
Even more Geos info, including video
Assigned lesson subject + given planning help

Day 3
Teaching 20 minute lesson
1-on-1 interview


Day 1 starts with a very short introduction to Geos. You then sit a "test" on English grammar and general knowledge for about 15 minutes. The first half of the test is questions like name the word type (noun, verb, etc.); tenses (change this sentence into perfect perfect simple, etc.); and spellings. The second half of the test is pure general knowledge, like capital cities, identifying the former or new name of countries (e.g. you are given Ceylon and have to identify it as now being Sri Lanka) - I really loved this part of it because I love general knowledge. I say "test" with the quotation marks because when I did the interview anyone who failed got to do it again on the second day. People who failed were encouraged to team up with people who passed to get the answers before the re-take (teamwork practice).

Next on day 1 you are given a very open subject to teach a five minute lesson on. You have 15 minutes to prepare the lesson, then you teach it to one of the recruiters (1-on-1).

The first day ends with lots more detailed info about Geos. During this time they'll also get you to do team-building stuff - the usual name learning games, etc. Be enthusiastic at these points; if you're asked to do a forfeit because you've lost a game or something, do it without question. Day 1 is over.

The whole of Day 2 is basically the same as the end of Day 1 - learning stuff about Geos and doing team-building, role playing, information gap exercises. The day ends with everyone getting a sheet from a Geos textbook with the basic outline of a lesson, on which you base a lesson that you plan overnight. You get a bit of guidance on this at the end of Day 2.

Day 3 starts with you delivering your lesson. You are told to plan for a 30 minute lesson, but then, in a "surprise" twist, they only want you to teach 20 minutes of it - i.e., can you adapt at short notice to changes. After you've done your lesson (to the other interviewees) you have a 1-on-1 interview with one of the recruiting staff, and fill in a questionaire.

That's it really. Be prepared to do the team-building stuff as I mentioned above, and lots of the tasks you have to do end up with you parroting the Geos way of working/teaching. Although, to be fair, they do point out some of their weaknesses and the strengths of other companies. I'd say the most important things over the course of the three days are: look professional (suit, tie, jacket, etc.) at all times and be enthusiastic. Some nice flash cards or pictures in your Day 3 lesson go over well also, so stock up on some coloured card, glue, etc. before the three days start. You are closely watched for the entire three days.

Another experience (June, 2003)
I interviewed with GEOS just last weekend and have been given an offer with them. The 3-day long process was perhaps the most organized, efficient, grueling, and intense (yet somehow, fun) interview I have ever been through. In a way, it was like being on a reality TV show, where you are thrown together with a group of strangers from all over and are given various tasks. You don't know how many positions are available and you're doing your best to not get eliminated. Do not expect to relax during the weekend (except Sunday night or unless you get cut), and definitely do not plan on any activities for Saturday night if you make it past the 2nd cut.

Friday's session starts at 9 am or 11 am depending on which time slot you signed up for. If you are part of the 9 am group and you make the first cut, you will need to wait until 2 pm for the afternoon session which combines the candidates from both the 9 am and 11 am groups.

You should definitely review your grammar before taking the 20-min quiz. The quiz is the first thing they administer to determine your English skills. They use the results to make the first cut. After grading the quizzes, they will discuss your results during one-on-one interviews.

During the afternoon session which runs from 2 pm until 4:30 - 5 pm, they will formally introduce you to GEOS by giving you some basic information. They will explain their company, philosophy, history, salary, vacation, teaching methods, etc. You are allowed to ask any questions you have regarding Japan, teaching, or GEOS. You then do some pairwork and group activities such as a 5-min group demonstration.
At the end of the session, they make the second cut. If successful, you are invited back to continue with the rest of the weekend.

Saturday's session starts at 8:30 am or 9 am, depending on whether you need to retake your quiz. It ends around 3:30 - 4 pm. During Saturday's session, training officially begins. You are given a handbook which exposes you to even more information about GEOS. Here, they cover the basic information they gave you yesterday in more detail. Expectations, dress code, schedules, apartment furnishings, training, company organization, career opportunities, their teaching format, the business side, etc. are all discussed. They demonstrate the GEOS teaching method and even give you their evaluation form so you know exactly what they are looking for. You are required to make your own teaching materials for your 30-min demonstration on Sunday. It definitely helps to have scissors, glue, tape, construction paper, etc. to construct your teaching materials. Many out-of-towners had to purchase their own supplies. Since the Japan head office evaluates you by your materials, everyone I knew, including myself, stayed up until 3:30 am working on them.

Sunday's session begins at 8:45 am sharp and lasts until 12 - 1:30 pm. You form pairs and take turns delivering your teaching demo to one another. Afterwards, you are called in one by one to discuss the results of your demonstration and interviewed for any final remarks. By the time you are through, you should have a good idea of whether or not they will give you an offer. The entire process was similar to a GEOS bootcamp. There was a high degree of comraderie among the interviewees because we were all going through the same thing. The results of the interview will be given to you in 2 days. Their response time is amazing compared to most American companies.

I am not sure about whether all GEOS interviews are held over the weekend, but I'm thinking they probably are since most people have to fly in for the interview.

I also would appreciate hearing about any recent GEOS experiences firsthand. After the interview, my impression of GEOS is quite favorable in that they were extremely professional, organized, and efficient for such a large company. They were very clear, open, and upfront with their expectations. The interviewees were all really cool people that I'd like to work with. However, since GEOS was the first company I've interviewed with, I'm not sure if I should hold out for JET, Aeon, or ECC

Another experience
I worked for GEOS for two years, and left in the late 90s. I would agree, yes, they do work you very hard. There is a business aspect too, and you are expected to sell texts, and also get new students to sign up or existing students to renew. This was the least pleasant part of the job for me.

On the teaching end, they had good resources available, some decent training, and good support from the trainers if you need it. Expect to teach all ages - I was told in my pre-departure training that I wouldnít teach kids, only to arrive and find out that 30 percent of my classes were with children. The manager had requested someone experienced with children, and she got me, so Iím not too sure about their recruitment and placement process.

The Japanese teachers - most of whom are `part time` and make terrible pay for a lot of work - were great, and helped me out a lot with everything from recommending restaurants to helping me make reservations for a holiday. Teachers at other GEOS schools said the same thing about their Japanese colleagues. GEOS always paid on time, and the apartment was in good shape when I arrived.

My class load varied from 8 /day during a very busy summer, to 5 or 6 a day most of the rest of the time. I enjoyed it, but know some who didnít, primarily because of the heavy teaching schedules and the sales expectations. GEOS is also cheap about some things, and was getting cheaper by the day when I was there. One Japanese friend who left GEOS and went to another job told me how surprised she was to be given stationery supplies on her first day at the new job - at GEOS you generally had to bring your own.

The only thing I can say about the interview is look professional and be enthusiastic. Look very professional. I interviewed with a different format, but noticed that those of who were called back for the second interview were the ones who had worn suits to the first interview.

Another experience
As far as I can remember day one eases you in. There is a lot of talk about GEOS as a company. You have to present a very short lesson, at this stage they will just want to see that you can stand up in front of people and speak clearly. You may have little or no choice on what you teach. There's also a written test on grammar, general knowledge and stuff. Also a small one on one interview on the first day I think. Day two is a lot more about GEOS policies and you will find out about GEOS methodology. On day three there is a longer interview and you will teach a GEOS lesson. They will want to see that you've planned your lesson well, made some nice props (flash cards or something) and applied GEOS methodology. Don't plan anything for the evenings because you will be preparing for the following day and make sure you are prepared with card scissors and coloured pens before day one.

Follow-up message by same person
The fact is that GEOS is not an easy company to work for and I think it's useful that they let you know that before you sign anything. GEOS is hard work and they try to sort the workers from the holiday makers in the interview. About two thirds of my interview group did not turn up for day three, I guess because they were required to put some work in the night before and plan a lesson. I don't think it's too much to ask for that you can demonstrate what you'll be employed to do

Another experience, January 2005
The GEOS interview took 2 1/2 in total. At the San Francisco site it took place on the first day within the Pan-Pacific Hotel on Post St. near Union Square. There the recruiter gives you a test that includes not only basic english grammar knowledge but also general knowledge on music, Japan, history, etc. Shouldn't be too hard to pass. Just know what certain words are; for example "fight" is a verb, "and" is a conjunction, etc.
If you don't pass on the first try you'll get a chance again to retake it tomorrow. Don't try to do too badly on either the test or the interview with your resume or they might not ask you back for the rest.

The first day is the shortest with a general info session and then they'll hand out envelopes that let you know if you got to the second stage or not.
The second day is the most intensive one, so bring a notepad for notes or even a recorder. When they do the examples of the GEOS method make sure to take good notes during the recruiter's demonstrations. You'll also be made the student or teacher during the demos.

Finally you'll be asked to do a teaching demonstration for 26 minutes at the end of the day according to the GEOS method. I tried to come up with different games than what the teacher did but I went a bit too far. This is what got me in the interview. Make your little activities and games as simple as possible. Plan out your presentation and try to practice it the night before. Get plenty of sleep too because the demonstration starts at 9. Or you might get lucky and sign up for the 11 start time (There's fewer slots available for the later time).

Basically, show them you can do their method as confidently and seamlessly as possible You're gonna' be working hard the night before the demonstration so be prepared. Also bring pens, construction paper, poster board, blank cards, and colored markers. These will come in handy big time for props you need to make for your presentation.

Smiling and a vivid personality are crucial. The SF recruiter is a strict and business-like, plus she's good at observing multiple people at once. Good luck. If you don't get the job you can apply again later if you want to. But if you don't like how they do things try other programs like AEON, ECC, NOVA, or JET.

Another experience, January 2005
I had an interview with GEOS last month.....

I drove about 500 miles to get to the interview, got a hotel room for 3 nights, basically spent a lot of money.

Okay enough of my complaining. The last person was pretty close to how it went at mine as well (I had the interview in Vancouver, B.C.).

We started with 8 people in our group. The dress is formal, you must be in a suit (girls, if you wear a skirt, wear nylons). As soon as we got there we too the grammar/knowledge test. This is a test that is designed to intimidate you and make you nervous, so just take it calmly. The knowledge portion may cover things you have never heard of, like name 3 members of the Warsaw pact, or give the current names to these countries, Siam, S. W. Africa, Berma, etc. They do give you a chance to take it later.

Then they give each person an individual interview and let you know if you are invited back in the afternoon. They cut 1.

The afternoon just started to explain what the company did and what we would be doing. Then they gave us a letter before we left to let us know if we were invited back tomorrow. They cut one more.

Down to 6. We went through a full day of the "Teaching Method" (I say that with quotes because I'm a certified teacher, and it's not a method). I was the only person that was an actual teacher there. One of our presenters was explaining the teaching method, and it seemed similiar to another teaching method called "Constructivism", so I asked if it was the same. They had never heard of it. I was really um... let's say... not impressed with their knowledge of teaching. Their method is so dumbed down that any 15 year old idiot could follow it (if they had 3 hours to prepare for every 30 min. lesson). Also, what type of ENGLISH class is it when you are NOT supposed to SPEAK TO THE STUDENTS IN ENGLISH!!! I think the best way to learn is to be immeresed in it. I learned Spanish that way in high school, I was totally lost the first week and then I caught on!

After knowing how many props and stupid little cards you have to make for each lesson, I'm glad that I didn't get the position. But it would have been nice to get some feedback; "they didn't need anyone", "you sucked". Whatever, just something besides "no". I was the most qualified and tutored 2 of the others the whole time, and I rocked the lesson.

I hope I helped a little, thanks for listening to my ranting in there too! ha ha
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Hanzo



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow glenski thanks, that was indeed very helpful!

Just another question or two, I have an interview with AEON a month after my GEOS interview, which I applied for quite a while ago and they just got back to me inviting me for an interview...hopefully the interview goes okay with GEOS, if not then I still have a chance..which is okay i guess (don't really want to work for nova).

Another thing, i've kinda got long hair...will this affect the way they look at me in the interview? At GEOS & AEON? I'd be happy to tidy it up and cut it shorter for Japan but don't particularly want to for the interview, any advice on that? if its tied up neatly it should be okay eh?

Help!
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Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't really understand why you would feel better about cutting your hair for the job but not for the interview, where image is more important.

Hard to say what they would think in the interview simply because we can't see what you look like. If it's clean and well groomed, I suppose that would be ok.

Does anyone working for AEON have any experience with this?
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Willy_In_Japan



Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Posts: 329

PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2005 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Geos has a dress code. It is going to leave a better impression if you come dressed they way they want before they have to let you know what is and is not acceptable.

I only remember all the details for males. Perhaps a former or current female Geos employee can list the female dress code.

Try not to arrive with facial hair. No earings or piercings. Hair cut as conservatively as possible. Wear a dark colour business suit. Perferably Black, Grey, or Dark Blue. A conservative (read white) shirt. A conservative tie. (no wild colours). Wear a white Tshirt under your shirt. If you have a watch, make sure it is not a sports watch. Try and have your shoes shined, and wear dark socks.

Some people at my interview made it to the third day and thought they could 'dress down' for the last day of the interview. One came dressed in a Sweatshirt and casual pants. Don't make this mistake.

You have to pass a grammar test. I would brush up on parts of speech. What is a 'gerund'? 'prefix'? for example.

In the interview, ask a few easy to answer questions, but not too many. Ie Show interest, but don't be a pain in the rear end. Participate in their silly 'role plays'. Role playing is a part of the GEOS 'method' of teaching, so don't be shy about doing their stupid skits.

Smile!

Be friendly, but keep your mouth mostly shut.

Don't indicate that you have specific demands about where you want to go in Japan, or that you have goals other than being a teacher. ie, learning Japanese is not going to impress them. Don't indicate you are coming over because of a girlfriend/boyfriend. You are going to need a few thousand bucks US to get over. Don't indicate that this might be a problem for you. Get hired and then try to solve the problem. If you can't then hit them with it. Don't give them reasons to weed you out of the process. The grammar test is the first one. If you do well in the other aspects, but not so well on the grammar, they will ask you to come back and re do the test. If you do poorly on the grammar and only ok in the other aspects, you will be sent home.

Good luck.
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hivans



Joined: 29 Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Location: fukuoka

PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2005 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks like there is a lot of information on the GEOS interview which should answer most of the OP`s questions. I had forgotten about the 5 minute teaching presentation you asked about. I think they give you a teaching point and very little time to prepare. However, I am sure they are not looking for something perfect given the preparation time - so long as you get the student doing something (ie it is not just you talking for 5 minutes) and look positive and try to create a fun atmosphere I am sure that will be enough.

A year after I did the GEOS interview, I started working for AEON. I am not a recruiter but I think long hair might reduce your chances with both companies. I do not think it would automatically rule you out but it might be "strike one". By the way, in my opinion the GEOS interview was a little tougher than the AEON interview but maybe that varies depending on the recruiter, time and place.

I am really sorry if this looks sticking my nose in with unwanted advice but there are just two thoughts that occur to me. It sounds like that for you the most important thing is being in Japan. If you have just recently graduated, is there some post graduate programme you could apply to that would have an exchange with a Japanese university?

Also, like you I decided I really wanted to come and work in Japan but one of the reasons I delayed was so that I could study Japanese for a year at home and get the CELTA certificate and some teaching experience under my belt before I came. For me, this has been really helpful. I wonder if this might be worth considering.

Well good luck with your forthcoming interviews, and hope things work out well for you.
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Hanzo



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2005 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Again, I thank you all for your input. I phoned geos earlier today about the long hair thing and for the interview it is okay, as long i'm willing to have it cut shorter for Japan, which I am....and thanks Willy for your words of advice, i'll give it my all.

Quite a good idea about the exchange hivans, i'll be sure to look into it...thing is with the 5 minute demonstration, even though i've got 15 minutes to prepare...I haven't got a clue how it'll work! (have no teaching experience) do they give you any idea about how they want you to teach your 5 minutes? and is it in front of everyone? (it says 1-on-1 but now i'm not entirely sure), i'm alright standing in front of people its just i've got no real teaching experience, except for tutoring my little cousin! anyone got any examples of how their little 5 min teaching thing went?

Thanks again guys...
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Willy_In_Japan



Joined: 20 Jul 2004
Posts: 329

PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2005 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A BIG thing about GEOS is 'Teacher talk' versus 'Student talk'. Their 'ideal' is 20 percent teacher talking and 80 percent student talking. Now, this is a bit unrealistic, but it is what they want to shoot for.

GEOS uses the '3 P" method. It is
1. Presentation

"Present" the language.

2. Practice

have the student drill the new language

3. Production

have the student use the language in a role playing or skit type situation.

Geos is big on 'eliciting' what the student already knows.

So, if they give you a target language........let's say 'going to'.

Write 'I am going to TOKYO'
and 'I am going shopping'

Ask something like 'what is the difference between these two sentences?'

The student might point out that one uses 'going' and the other 'going to'. See what the student knows, and then tell the student that 'going to' is used for places, and that 'going' is used for actions.

write some examples on the board, and have the student practice the language. Many Japanese students say "going to shopping". You write places and things on the board and have the students practice. If there is more than one student, have the students work in pairs to maximize talking time. Cards or slips of paper with the practice on it could be useful too, depending on how much time you have to prepare.

If you can think of a role play....maybe a party or a situation where they could use the language, you could have them put on a short 'production'.

The important thing in any drill that you give the students is to MODEL the drill....DONOT explain it.

What Geos considers important is 'eliciting', 'modelling', and 'talk time' as well, as their 'method' of Presentation, Practice, and Production.

Of course they have more 'steps' in their method, but that is it in a nutshell.
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Hanzo



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2005 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks again willy, thats great..it really helps to know how they expect you to teach. The idea of 20% teacher talking is okay I guess, just need to get the students to talk! By asking questions etc.

I know thats probably everything...but if anyone has anything else to add please do!

Going to brush up on my grammar now!
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wintersweet



Joined: 18 Jan 2005
Posts: 345
Location: San Francisco Bay Area

PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2005 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Willy_In_Japan wrote:
A BIG thing about GEOS is 'Teacher talk' versus 'Student talk'. Their 'ideal' is 20 percent teacher talking and 80 percent student talking. Now, this is a bit unrealistic, but it is what they want to shoot for.
(snip)
Geos is big on 'eliciting' what the student already knows.
(snip)


Huh. This is much more progressive/student-centered than I had expected from a big eikaiwa chain...Somewhat encouraging, really.

/thread hijack, sorry!
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hivans



Joined: 29 Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Location: fukuoka

PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not get too worried about the 5 min demo. I think it will be one on one with one of the recruiters. They give you a teaching point - mine was present progressive to describe current action - "I am doing". What I did was to mime a couple of actions asking the student "what am I doing" to get her to provide answers (she identified my playing soccer as dancing) and then write some verbs do for her to change to "i am ...ing" format and then got her to mime a few actions and produce "i am ....ing" sentences. Your prepartion time is too short to do much in the way of visuals or anything - and 5 mins will fly by so I reckon the main thing is try to ask questions to elicit the right reply from the demo student and then try ot get her to do a bit of practice - and make sure you have at least one joke (probably a visual one like a silly mime ready). Its really not that different from preparing for a conversation which we all do 1,000 times a day - I am sure the key is to look relaxed and make sure your demo student is speaking. After all, they will know about your teaching experience and they have still decided to interview you - so they have judged you a potential teacher already and they surely are not going to expect some perfect lesson from an ESL veteran.
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Hanzo



Joined: 07 Apr 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2005 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Once again hivans, that has opened my mind up a great deal honestly. I understand that you would mime and have the student guess with the "I am ...ing" grammar point but why would you have have them mime? Of course there's no point in you guessing right? Maybe I could have them guess what i'm doing and then write a few verbs up and have the student put it into the correct form...then again, would you get them to mime it, hmm maybe actually, dunno i'll just see how it goes - i'll keep you posted.
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hivans



Joined: 29 Aug 2004
Posts: 51
Location: fukuoka

PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It`s so long ago - I can`t remember exactly what I did. I think I got the student to do the action while they were talking (I think this is what is called Total Physical Response - but I did not know it at the time, and I am not even sure that I am right now). Anyway, the idea is that it is easier to remember something if you associate the word with a physical action. Anyway, really, dont get too stressed over the whole thing. Why dont you look at your grammar book, pick three points at random and think about how you would do a 5 minute demo on them? It would be good practice for the interview. I am sure that the main thing is that you look enthusiastic in the demo and get the student talking, and laughing would be the the a real bonus.
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