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Newbie in Germany
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xalapa



Joined: 22 Apr 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 12:18 am    Post subject: Newbie in Germany Reply with quote

I've got a little bit of teaching experience (a few months) in Mexico, plus a shiny new SIT TESOL certificate and a BA degree. If I show up in Germany with enough money for a couple months, do I have any chance of landing a job, or would I do better to give up before I start?

I'm sure this has been asked before, but I couldn't find the post.

Micah
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12305
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The recession in Germany has brought with it more than 5 million unemployed. That cuts down the number of jobs in EFL teaching.

Membership of the EU means that there are obstacles to employing people who are not citizens of a EU member state.

IF the USA became a member state of the EU it would be easier for US citizens to get job s here.
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crashartist1



Joined: 06 Jun 2004
Posts: 164

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is pasted copy of something I wrote a couple months ago.

It is a fallacy that only European Union members can work in Germany, or that the language schools wonít hire you if youíre not a holder of an E.U. passport because they donít want to do the paperwork. The biggest obstacle is supply and demand. The market is flooded with English teachers, mainly U.K. TEFLerís. With so many U.K. TEFLerís running around needing more work, and the job being so stark, there just isnít the need to reach out and hire everyone. Also, non-E.U. passport holders get their own freelance paperwork working VISA that they can apply for at the Germany Embassy in any country they are in regardless of where they are from and it is not any more of a problem for the language schools to hire say Americans or Canadians then it is to hire a Briton or Scot. What it all boils down too are education, experience and cultural relation. Since the U.K. is closer and cheaper to fly to, there is also a much more international atmosphere around Great Britain as a whole compared to most of North America plus the culture shock, living environment and social ideology is a much better fit for U.K.ers in Europe and the schools know this. Many schools have felt the repercussions of hiring foreigners from so far overseas only to have them get really home sick or unhappy and leave. Yes this is all a great generalization, but when you have a market that is fragile you donít want to kick it around. The administration of the schools are looking for the safe teacher that they feel wonít cause damage, not so much a teacher that is going to raise the bar, but keep the status quo by keeping the paying clients happy and coming. Now, on the other hand, if you are North AmeriCanadian and have the right qualifications in terms of a M.A. in TESOL or anything of the sort compared to a E.U. passport holder with a B.A. in Tittlewinks and a nifty little certificate that says you paid 600 sterling to sit through a course for a month without getting too bored you will get a job in a second, professional qualifications are the key to all markets. The M.A. shows that (in theory and hasnít stopped me though) you arenít going to be drunk for a year while living off of Mumís and Dadís money they gave you for finally finishing your University degree after 9 years (no worries, lots of people take 9 years to finish college, their called doctors).
The unemployment level in Germany estimated at closer to 22 million (highest since postwar WW2) rather then the 18 million counted because they donít count the workers in retraining programs. So the money for company incentive programs/external training programs like English schools and individuals spending habits are also conservative because prices are rising in relation to the deflating dollar. Since most monetary policies are based on the US greenback the purchasing power has decreased and people are feeling the pinch of imported goods. Role this all up in one big blanket basically learning a foreign language is a luxury and it is no longer affordable. Hence the decrease in demand for English teachers and the fragile market of the ESL world in Germany.
Now if you go over to Germany, and an apartment lined up, already have your permit in hand and a couple thousand Euros it should take you about 2-3 months to find enough work to keep you busy and able to pay the bills. Now, taxes are extremely high in Germany and foreigners can actually work for 2 years in Germany and not may taxes, but after those two years the government wants all that tax for those two years. Now at this point you can leave, and not pay the tax, but you cannot work in Germany again until you pay the tax. I am not sure how that works, so maybe if you ask Scot47 or Jzer then perhaps than can clarify this position. Also, you had better have the ability to speak german, if not, donít bother coming because then you will have a real difficult time finding enough work. İf you speak German and can find a creative way to get students, like University students, then you might be okay with some side work from a language school.

Well, thatís what I think and I have been told not to think because it sets off the smoke alarms, so I better stop now before my computer suffers water damage.

Any questions?
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xalapa



Joined: 22 Apr 2005
Posts: 12
Location: Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hm...

I don't speak German. That's kinda why I wanted to go to Germany. Sad

This isn't looking hopeful.

Micah
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butterbrot



Joined: 14 Dec 2004
Posts: 53

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 2:33 pm    Post subject: hoping for Germany? Reply with quote

Micah,

It isn't realistic to want to come to Germany to teach so that you can learn the language. It's not to say impossible but it is important for teachers to know some German before they arrive and hope to find work.

There are many teachers here and not so much work. Most teachers already living here speak German so you'd be competing with more experienced and more desirable others for work.

Better to get more experience and take some classes to learn German before you try what you'd like to do.
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JZer



Joined: 16 Jan 2005
Posts: 3824
Location: Alaska

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
after 9 years (no worries, lots of people take 9 years to finish college, their called doctors


crashartist1, well or they are German students. I think the average German takes about 7 years to get their Magister (equvalent of an MA). There are tow factors that have lead to this. One is that many German universities are underfunded and students often cannot get the classes that they need. Secondly since German only pay a registration fee from 50-75 Euros (depending on the university) there is not much of a hurry to finish.
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JZer



Joined: 16 Jan 2005
Posts: 3824
Location: Alaska

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

xalapa, also you would probably only earn around 1000 Euro a month. You would get paid about the same if you worked in Thailand and it is a lot cheaper than Germany. Even if you find a job in Germany you will be lucky just to pay the bills.
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crashartist1



Joined: 06 Jun 2004
Posts: 164

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Xalapa, Germany is wonderful place, so much history, so much beauty it is a great place to live. But at this point it is very hard to find work there. If you are interested in Europe, then I suggest you try Eastern Europe while you can still get in. Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic are beautiful places and wonderful culture. If you want to come to Germany, come fulfill your dream, but do it in a smart way that can help you succeed for the long run.
I speak German, lived in Germany, have an M.B.A. currently doing a M.A. in English Language Teaching, I have five years experience teaching, 3 in a University, I have been a director of two schools for 3 years and I still can't get a good job in Germany so after I finish this M.A. am going to go get a Ph D., how does the situation in Germany look now? Yeah pretty grim, but I am doing everything I can to ensure that when I do make that move, it will be for a great position in a place I want to live and provide me with a decent living, I am not going to go running after little free lance contracts from language schools or trying to fill all my time with private lessons I want to enjoy life in Germany. I suggest you explore your options and see what will work out best for you, I wanted to make sure I could live there and stay, Germany isnít going anywhere (except their economy) so relax and prepare yourself.
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JZer



Joined: 16 Jan 2005
Posts: 3824
Location: Alaska

PostPosted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

xalapa, sorry for the discouraging words. I am not trying to stop you from your dream. If you really want to go live in Germany for a year then save some money and then go look for a job.

Like crashartist1 said, if you are willing to live in Eastern Europe it would be easier to get a job and live decently. Others can correct me if I am wrong but I think it is pretty easy to get a job in Poland if it interest you.

Furthermore, like crashartist was trying to show, if you want something you need to work to try and get it. He wants to work in Germany and is doing everything he can to put himself in the best position to do it. I would like to live in Central or South America but am not willing to work for $500 U.S a month for the rest of my life. So I will spend one year in Brazil and then move somewhere to save some money so I can invest it and be able to have plenty of money to live nicely where I want to.
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wigan4



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Posts: 34

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2005 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've lived in Germany 11 years so I know it pretty well. If you can't find a job in Germany don't think twice about going to the Czech Rep. If you can find something in the west--maybe Karlovy Vary--you'll be living in a Germanic culture and have easy access to Germany any time you want. If you're in Czech you might as well be in Germany, except that it's better in some ways. Go there, get stuck in, and see what happens from there.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12305
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2005 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do not think your average Czech would take kindly to being told that Czech culture is "Germanic".

I know dozens of people with fluent German who would LOVE to work in Germany but have accepted the reality of the job market. Do you think we are all in the Gulf Countries because we like it here ?
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Sadie25



Joined: 03 Jun 2005
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2005 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Karlovy Vary is a sleepy spa town, you'd find more TEFL opportunities on the moon.
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gZo



Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:24 am    Post subject: Easy for Americans Reply with quote

Hi there don't worrie it's worth a try!
Well, let me tell you something,
the job situation is not the best here, but as an American specially with your education you will defiantly be able to find work.
Maybe you would get a job at a language school like VHS. (Volkshochschule) It's enough first to speak English native and gain basics in German.
My girlfriend got one, it just took about 2 month, but she gave up earlier and was already gone. And if you really want to get a Job and don't really care what kind it is, then you could defiantly work as civilien for the U.S. Military here. Check the affees site not sure if it's called like that. They employ civilians and you should have good chances. And if you got an employment you also get a working visa then.
I know one American which sells VW to the new arrivals from the army and he makes shit loads on cash. If you have any questions feel free to ask me.

cheers.
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CROGO



Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Posts: 46
Location: Krakow

PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2006 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I am thinking about living in Germany, what kind of visa do I, as a US citizen, need?

Last edited by CROGO on Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:40 am; edited 1 time in total
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butterbrot



Joined: 14 Dec 2004
Posts: 53

PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2006 3:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

CROGO wrote:
If I am thinking about living in Germany, but working across the border in another country and commuting, what kind of visa do I, as a US citizen, need?


It wouldn't be wise to rely on advice gained from a discussion board on such a complicated arrangement as you've just outlined. Best to consult a consulate if you're outside Germany. You should also ask the consulate to give you some information on just what your status would be for paying tax on earnings outside Germany even though your residence would be in Germany.

It would be much simpler to live and work in the same European country, especially as an American.
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