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Few Jobs in Germany
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11694
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2003 6:23 pm    Post subject: economics Reply with quote

I wanted to point out that Germany is going through the toughest time since the economic crises of 1922-1926 and 1929-1933.

It is difficult for native speaker teachers to get jobs.

For pointinmg out these evident truths I have been accused of eveything under the sun, and it has even been implied that I am anti-American with "an agenda". Wow ! Will I be summonsed to appear before HUAC ?
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grahamb



Joined: 30 Apr 2003
Posts: 1349

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2003 11:59 am    Post subject: You are hereby summonsed... Reply with quote

Scot, I believe Joe McCarthy´s ghost is headed your way, followed closely by the NKVD and the Spanish Inquisition.

In Scot´s defence, I´ve followed his postings closely since I joined this forum. He´s blunt and takes no prisoners, but he´s no bigot.
Stating that the EU is basically closed to non-EU citizens is not being anti-American: it´s a simple statement of fact.
Sure, there are some non-EU citizens working legally here, but they´re exceptions to the rule.
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MoggIntellect



Joined: 04 Apr 2003
Posts: 173
Location: Chengdu, P.R.China

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2003 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As to the wondering about the North American desire to go to Germany... I cannot speak for everyone but for me it has nothing to do with heritage. Quite simply, I spent a year there and fell in love with the country and culture.

I don't think I could state strongly enough that I think it is my favourite place on Earth. I love that country so much, yet it is almost impossible to get there. The only reason I took CELTA was to get to Germany, and now it seems like the chance as a North American is nil.

The culture is far from ours over here in North America. Relationships are closer, people are less superficial, and people/the culture is more relaxed and free spirited. Here one is bogged down with jobs, SUVs, the house with the white picket fence, the family, the BBQ going every weekend... etc. The whole American dream makes me sick.

How great is it in Germany, where the beer is cheap and wonderful... where you can go on vacation to a handful of other European countries, with their own special and unique culture... where you can get from point A to point B without a car; even small towns are linked by public transport... where you can't find Oreo cookies and other crappy American foods... where fast food means a delicious Döner... etc. Do you need me to go on?

In one word: Sehnsucht.
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Showem



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2003 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you aren't happy with your life and where you are now, what makes you think you will be happy here in Germany?

It's true, I can't find Oreo cookies without a search here, but why does that make it a good place? I have a bakery chain on every second corner that sells exactly the same stuff all over the country instead.

The number of people who have spoken to me with the desire to "be a nomad for a year or two" and "get away from the rat race" by moving to Germany and teaching English are delusional. Germans expect professionality from their teacher and trainers and people who are teaching because it will pay the bills while they search for themselves won't last long.

I'm not throwing this out at anyone is specific, sorry if it seems that way Mogg, coming right after your comment.

If you want to make it to Germany, look for more ways than simply teaching English. Come as an Au-Pair if you are young enough. Try applying to Irish pubs or bars as staff. Take the long way around and start working for the subsidiary of a German-based company in your own country. Probably more lucrative in the end anyways. If you still really want to teach English here, don't bother sending your resumes to any companies while you still are living in country X. People want to know you are commited to teaching here and that means proving that you at least are in the country. Expect to find a fair amount of short-term contracts and no full-time jobs (there are exceptions, but so few or worthy positions, it's not worth mentioning).

It's not impossible. Quit worrying about whether or not you are an EC member. If you are a freelance teacher, you don't need a work-permit from the company. But you will have to show means of supporting yourself for your residence permit if you want one that allows you to work. A tourist visa won't cut it.

A final word to those who say there's no money to be made here. There is, but certainly don't expect it to fall into your hands the first 6 months you are here, but keep applying, keep networking, and keep slogging away. It can pay off.
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MoggIntellect



Joined: 04 Apr 2003
Posts: 173
Location: Chengdu, P.R.China

PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2003 11:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally speaking, I am not in a haze of delusion... I understand fully that Germany is not a utopia. I am not looking to get away from it all or become nomadic or backpack, rather, after spending some time there I realized that I was happiest with that mode of life, and that I wanted to settle down there.

I fully agree that you can make your home and create happiness whereever you are, and that a change of country alone does not equate a change in happiness (if one is unhappy), however, I also think that certain people are suited to live in certain places. Just as there are people who enjoy big cities and others who enjoy rural life, I enjoy Germany, and I feel I am suited to live there.

All I wish to convey is that some of us North Americans really long to live in Germany. It is unfortunate that most of the time our longing is passed off as merely "the grass is always greener" or that we do not fully understand what we desire. Just as when someone is in love with another person, simply becuase you are in bliss doesn't mean you cannot see the other person's faults, nor does it mean that your desire is less founded.

And by the way, I love those chain bakeries. Have a Kirschstruessel for me. Surprised)
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11694
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2004 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Time to revive this given the continuing debate. It seems now that more are siding with me !

Negative ? or Realistic ?
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longtimeteach



Joined: 25 Apr 2004
Posts: 107

PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2004 12:46 pm    Post subject: Americans and rosy pictures Reply with quote

Good idea to revive this thread.

Firstly, I don't think it should seem all that odd that Americans would want to live here any more than it should seem odd that so many people around the world want to live in England or in the US. If we all loved the same square mile in the world, it would be one densely crowded mile! Wink Not everyone is born where they'd prefer to live. Seems simple as that.

Then, there's the persistent 'rosy picture' phenomenon. That seems fairly easy to understand too. When people really want to do something the mind says, "There MUST be a way" and the result is a persistent desire to 'see' the way. There's nothing wrong with wanting to hear some good news but it pays to listen to the bad news as well.

In my experience, if you really want to do something, then do it. Don't look around for others to validate your wish by giving you some positive news. If you really want to do it, find a way and do it in spite of the bad news. Make your own experience. It might be a bad experience and it might turn out better than anyone expected but just do it, knowing there IS a down side to what you intend to do.

I asked myself if I'd have come here if all the news had been bad about work then. I don't know. I do know that my first year here was incredibly miserable. I stuck it out because I wanted to prove something to myself - it was a personal hurdle I wanted to overcome and had nothing to do with the work climate. In the end, things got better (though never financially!) and I've stayed - with the odd lengthy trip out.

Lastly, why wouldn't anyone want to come to Germany? It's a lovely country with lovely people. Every place is 'lovely' to someone.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11694
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After a recent spat with the Malaysian Hod I thought I would revive this thread. How is it for EFLers in Germania these days ?

To me this is a matter of idle curiosity. i shall be out of the labour market in 60 days when I retire !
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8606
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fewer passport holders from non-EU countries - at least that's what my friends tell me.
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artemisia



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 867
Location: the world

PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wonder how many of the American teachers I met there were doing border flits every three months or so. This was pre- Schlengen and there were quite a few around. I never thought to ask but I know some had contracts.

Things were busy during the (unsuccessful) merger of Daimler Chrysler and died down after that along with the general downturn in the economy. Training budgets are always the first be slashed in companies and that had a direct impact on the TEFL industry. The worst thing to happen to freelancers generally (not just language teachers) was the enforcement of an old law regarding pension payments. Regardless of whether you planned to stay in the country or not, you were supposed to pay into the fund and it would be backdated by whenever you first arrived.

I thought that would kill things off and maybe it has, along with the Schlengen laws. This is hardly a thriving forum.
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cajun902



Joined: 24 May 2011
Posts: 5
Location: Phoenix

PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My understading, according to the Emabassy, if you have a work contract, germany will provide you with a work visa. The paperwork is a mere formality.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 11694
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always found the German work ethic a bit frightening. They really do take that stuff seriously !
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9126
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
if you have a work contract, germany will provide you with a work visa. The paperwork is a mere formality


Yes - clearly it's getting someone to give you a contract for work that's the major hurdle here!

The word I get on the streets about newbie-level EFL in Germany is that, as noted above, many fewer non-EU teachers are hanging around. Likely due in large part to Artemesia's point regarding the end of the border-run option in Jan of 2009. It's now necessary to be sure to get legal- which takes some doing.

If I were trying to break into the German EFL market at the newbie level, I'd pick a city and get there at the first of September, in hopes that I'd be lucky enough to find a school that wanted to give me a contract for enough hours/week and months long to qualify for a working visa. Then, I'd try to add enough odd hours with other schools and private students to make enough to get by the first year.

I'd take care to build my contacts, local rep, and German language skill, and hope things might progress in upcoming years to something more solid.
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sparks



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 457

PostPosted: Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To add to the "Why do Americans love Germany?" question. Some Volks I know here, one country East of the Fatherland claim that Americans seem to have an obsession with WWII and Nazis in particular. I think there is evidence for this if you look at the way some of the vocab from the Third Reich is tossed around in American politics. Perhaps the English are also somewhat obsessed (I've seen more than one Nazi-themed English comedy sketch)

What does anyone else think? Why do you love NSDAP Germany? Smile
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9126
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Jul 18, 2011 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't lived in Germany, but on the border and very often travel across the country from Netherlands to the Czech Rep. Things I love about Germany (not to mention the gruesome bit of history): it's clean, well-organised, and infrastructure works. People are generally hard-working, innovative, and goal-oriented. Landscape is lovely and again, clean. Cities very livable.

There are lots of positive reasons to love Germany.
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