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Z Visas and Residence Permits
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Bud Powell



Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2014 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You will have to take another physical when you arrive, but DO bring the results of your home physical with you.

Visa courier services are the way to go. In the U.S., I recommend Travel Document Systems.
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The_Kong



Joined: 15 Apr 2014
Posts: 349

PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2014 1:34 pm    Post subject: Re: Using a visa processing service Reply with quote

Bud Powell wrote:
Imsoconfused44 wrote:
I am waiting to receive my work permit and invitation letter. I have heard it can take multiple attempts to get the z-visa approved.


Bull Chips. Either you're approved or you're not. (i.e., Either you meet qualifications or you don't. One doesn't continue to apply until he is accepted. If the school (or the Ministry of Education) accepts you, the local consulate will accept you. It may be a different story once you arrive in China and take the physical).


Bud is right, I've been doing recruiting for several years now and either they accept you or not.

The only need to apply multiple times is if the school/you provide the wrong documents.

The only time we had to reapply was when I sent the wrong translation of a University degree to the vice-principal (who physically handles the visa applications) and he didn't notice so when it was submitted the Degree was fine but the translation was for a different applicant. They informed us within a day that the application was rejected because of that, I realized the mistake and sent the proper one and the application was accepted.
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True Blue



Joined: 12 Nov 2014
Posts: 71

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 4:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bud gives great advice in this thread but I would make three more additions to your preparations for your China adventure:

1) Bring certified copies of all your important documents (diplomas, tefl certificates, awards, birth certificate, divorce certificate, transcripts, etc) and of course your passport that has at least a year remaining before expiration with a Z visa affixed inside. You may not need all these documents to teach in China but you may need them for other things that come up unexpectedly - like marriage, getting business licenses, etc.

2) Bring at least $3,000 of emergency cash just in case things are not to your liking in China, you get swindled, or you simply cannot adapt to the new lifestyle (about a third of foreign teachers don't stay in China more than six months) Take note that many of your credit cards will not work in China. Be sure to notify your credit card companies that you a will be in China for a few months or the ATM machines will grab your card and tell you to visit your local bank home to get a new card because their security safeguards caught "someone" in China was caught using your card!

3) Take five minutes to read this warning which many people take for granted: http://www.chinascamwatch.org/warning-.html

Safe journey and welcome to China!
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Bud Powell



Joined: 11 Jul 2013
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2014 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

True Blue wrote:
Bud gives great advice in this thread but I would make three more additions to your preparations for your China adventure:

1) Bring certified copies of all your important documents (diplomas, tefl certificates, awards, birth certificate, divorce certificate, transcripts, etc) and of course your passport that has at least a year remaining before expiration with a Z visa affixed inside. You may not need all these documents to teach in China but you may need them for other things that come up unexpectedly - like marriage, getting business licenses, etc.



If your legal presence in China comes into doubt, your documents will need to be authenticated before you leave home. I seriously doubt that someone in China who doubts that one is married will accept anything but an authenticated document. Same for a degree. Certification from your home country is meaningless in China, despite the fact that China signed on to the Dayton Accord and the Hague Agreement over ten years ago. These international agreements require governments to recognize official documents from other countries as bona fide. If the consulate accepts them as bonafide, and you are issued a visa based upon the documents presented to them, you don't need to carry them with you. The consulate's word is the last word.

If one is worried that his credentials will come into question, he should go all the way and have his certificates and degrees authenticated by the Chinese Consulate. Then he can carry them with him to China. Anything less than that won't mean diddly to anyone in the People's Republic of Capitalism.

Years ago, protocol required that the process begin at the lowest local level at home (in the U.S.), then move to the state level to the State Attorney General, then to the U.S. Department of State.

THEN, all that had to be sent to the Chinese Consulate for further certification. A letter was attached to copies of your credentials, and TA DA! everything was bullet-proof legitimate.

I don't think that anyone in the PSB (or whoever doubts the authenticity of your credentials in China) will accept anything except authentication from the Chinese consulate. After all, it has a nice rice paper cover page, and bears the signature of Patrick Hatchett, and the documents are all defaced with several red chops.

Unless you get authentication from the consulate, you're wasting time getting some notary's imprint. A notary can only certify that a copy is an actual copy of an original. It does not attest to the authenticity of the original. Local certification would consist of an ATTACHED (with a grommet) affidavit attesting to the authenticity of the document.

That's the way it works.

Been there, done that.

If you want to get married in China, there's a special process that you'll have to go through to verify that you are unencumbered by a legal spouse. Each state has a different name for it. The state will issue a document which you will present to your local Chinese poobah.
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Scrabble King



Joined: 25 Dec 2014
Posts: 91

PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 3:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In 2015 you MUST have a Z visa to work in China and to get your residence permit. You also MUST have a genuine university degree/diploma and in Beijing and Shanghai you also MUST have a police certificate to prove you have no felony convictions. If anyone tries to tell you differently, tell them to go read http://chinascamwatch.org and remember the golden rule...

NO Z VISA = SCAM
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coldcucumber



Joined: 21 Dec 2012
Posts: 115

PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scrabble King wrote:
In 2015 you MUST have a Z visa to work in China and to get your residence permit. You also MUST have a genuine university degree/diploma and in Beijing and Shanghai you also MUST have a police certificate to prove you have no felony convictions. If anyone tries to tell you differently, tell them to go read http://chinascamwatch.org and remember the golden rule...

NO Z VISA = SCAM


Yes on the first two counts, z visa only, and esl carts don't hurt of course, but the Cafu stuff is baloney.
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sharona



Joined: 01 Jun 2004
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had really big hopes on China as still being the one last place I could teach without a degree and still make reasonable money so I can continue travelling.

I taught there for 6 mths five years ago. When I was there a good school in Guangdong agreed to hire me and managed to obtain a resident's permit for me but I messed up and came home early.

The same school sounds like they may be willing to consider re-employing me later this year. Alternatively I was hoping to go to Kunming (Yunnan).

I guess my questions are -

I need the Z visa to get the residency permit to legally stay & teach, correct?

And technically I can't get the Z visa without a degree unless the school can somehow wrangles it?

And if they do but I get caught will I be fined / deported? How true is this?

http://www.chinascamwatch.org/foreign-teacher-facts.html


I appreciate any advice / recommendations / fairy godmother visitations, etc...
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Kaisho



Joined: 27 Feb 2015
Posts: 1
Location: Cincinnati, OH

PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2015 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all,

I'm a brand new ESL noob starting my journey in mid-April. My CELTA will be complete in mid-May. I will definitely apply for jobs in Thailand, but I want to explore options in China too.

I would like to know if it is possible to apply for a Z visa at a consulate outside of my home country (United States)? Just in case I do find a job in China, I would like to bring the necessary documents with me to Thailand including the health check results. I have the results from a statewide criminal check. Will that be sufficient?

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you!
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AlecBaldwinsEgo



Joined: 15 Nov 2014
Posts: 11

PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2015 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I need the Z visa to get the residency permit to legally stay & teach, correct?


correct

Quote:
And technically I can't get the Z visa without a degree unless the school can somehow wrangles it?


correct

Quote:
And if they do but I get caught will I be fined / deported? How true is this?


correct
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Trufranco



Joined: 02 Jul 2013
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2015 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does anyone have any information about the new requirements for the Z visa? Specifically the required years experience. I've heard two years pretty consistently, but is it strictly two years after graduation? Or just two years of experience?

I graduated last year and am currently on a Z visa working for a public school in Shenzhen. I heard I got in on it before the visa changes. Now I've got a university offering me a job with high pay and am wanting to move over to them for next year, but I'm worried about being able to secure the Z visa with the new employer. Does anyone have any insight or links to official websites I could follow?
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wujane



Joined: 28 Apr 2015
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2015 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi everyone Very Happy

i got a release recommendation letter from my previous school 31.3.2015
after only working 2 months.

i have a z visa which expires early august.


i started a new job today. they have informed me i will need to go to hong kong in about 6 weeks?

they told me because there is bigger than a 10 day gap i have to leave.

is this standard practice ?

both web schools.

thanks
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Jandoraa



Joined: 28 May 2015
Posts: 10
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2015 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've read that the wording of the z visa regulations is what, in some cases, allows people to have a z visa with no degree. I read that the official wording says the applicant "should" hold a bachelors degree, not "must". This, so I read, allows some smaller places to use their own discretion when interpreting the regulations. Does this sound possible at all?
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theoriginalprankster



Joined: 19 Mar 2012
Posts: 846

PostPosted: Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Z visa is currently being processed, and will receive my RP next week, here in Shanghai (hope it's a 12 monther, unlike Xiamen, which only issues 6 monthers now).

However, the majority of my working hours are in the office, with just seven 40 minute periods at a middle school, in a new programme.

Essentially I'm working for the Singaporean-Chinese JV, not the school.

I wonder what the legality issues on my status are. Also, seems I won't be getting a FEC or little Health Certificate Book, just an RP - is that an issue? I always had an FEC and HCB working at Xiada.
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JRJohn



Joined: 21 Jun 2006
Posts: 173

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 10:56 pm    Post subject: Ridiculous Reply with quote

I think it's bloody ridiculous if the Chinese authorities are still asking us to do the full medical check from abroad! I first went to China in 2010. That year, I had to download the Foreigner Physical from the Embassy website. I presented it to my G.P. in Scotland, who found it confusing. He said "This is not NHS work," and refused to deal with it at all, even though I suggested I could pay.
The BUPA Hospital refused. So I had to go to the MASTA Travel Clinic in Edinburgh. Yes they did the tests, ALL THE TESTS and stamped it. I had to pay about £400 and apparently it's £500 now. The Chinese would not compensate me for this. But they did all the tests again when I arrived in China! It's crazy! My frantic search for the right clinic meant I got to China late.
I enjoyed working at that job though, as it was one of the good schools!
Later, I got a job in Beijing. No medical required. But I noticed some people are still asking for it. Is it basically a question of how the authorities feel in each part of China?
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wangdaning



Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 3154

PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never did a medical before coming here, but that was ages ago and a weird situation. I haven't done one for about 5 years though. Not sure when they will require another one.
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