Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

GYA, Addis - opinions???

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Africa Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Cesca



Joined: 19 Jun 2005
Posts: 5
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2005 1:31 pm    Post subject: GYA, Addis - opinions??? Reply with quote

Hiya,

I have read a lot of positive stuff about GYA on this forum, but I have also heard some not so encouraging things from people who have worked there - like 6 out of 8 foreign teachers broke their contracts and left within their first two months. Not sure why though...

Just wondering if anyone who has personal experience of GYA, especially anyone currently teaching there, can offer advice to a newly qualified teacher thinking about heading to Ethiopia...

Also, any info/advice on other schools in Addis appreciated.

Thanks!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Legolarse



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2005 6:12 pm    Post subject: Me too... Reply with quote

Soz, I can't help but I too would like to know more about the school.

I enquired about teaching there but they said they wanted someone for a minimum of 10 months and I don't want to commit to that long for my first job, esp. since I've never even been to Africa before. Judging by the email I got from them, they seem to get a lot of people dropping out way before the end of the contract, leaving students and staff in the lurch.

Trouble is, there don't seem to be many other places in Ethiopia advertising for Eng teachers. Any recommendations?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cesca



Joined: 19 Jun 2005
Posts: 5
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2005 12:02 pm    Post subject: Schools in Ethiopia Reply with quote

Sorry legolarse, I don't know of any others either but am trying to find out!

Yeah, I got the same feeling too when I contacted GYA - they REALLY stressed that they want you to stay for the ten months...which gives the impression....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
laura1d



Joined: 13 Jan 2005
Posts: 108
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2005 1:48 pm    Post subject: gya Reply with quote

Hi There,

I was offered a job starting with GYA. For a variety of reasons I decided not to take the job. I am gutted because to teach in Africa is my dream but....

Anyhow, the one person that gave valuable, unbiased, DECENT advice was danmews - on this web site.

She was extremely helpful both about Addis Ababa and GYA. She did not slate the school or the city - rather she provided good advice and knowledge.

I don't know if she is reading this but if so... can you help these guys?

If you do go to GYA then I hope you have a great time - I am jealous!
One of the big reasons I am not going is money - I have been working in Thailand for 2 1/2 years now and although by local standards the money is good - it is not enough to set up somewhere like Ethipoia that is so expensive to fly to...

Maybe in the future!

Anyhow, good luck guys
Laura
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mchristophermsw



Joined: 14 Apr 2005
Posts: 228

PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2005 7:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Want to teach in ethiopia?

Check out the IFESH program

Ifesh.org

Goodluck!

Also, has anyone taught through them that could give an honest assessment? Would love to hear your opinions.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
Legolarse



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 36
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2005 9:41 am    Post subject: IFESH Reply with quote

According to the website, IFESH has an application deadine of 28 February, is only open for American teachers with three years of experience, and requires a commitment of at least a year.

Apart from that, it seems OK.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hardingl



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jul 18, 2005 4:35 am    Post subject: GYA - how it is! Reply with quote

Ethiopia and education are 2 of my favourite topics. I have been involved in both for a large portion of my adult life.

I have just returned from Ethiopia and met with the Head of GYA re volunteer teaching. I think the school offers a good opportunity for teaching and runs in a relatively western (American) manner ie strong administration, teacher support, and advanced curriculums. However, the 3 schools are ultimately run by 1 person who is very involved at every level, works very hard herself and has high expectations of staff.

I visited the houses and found them to be very good and clean. I would happily live there and infact feel it offer more than many hotels!

The volunteer teachers need to pay their airfares and innitial visa plus medical insurance if you want it. The school covers accommodation which is shared with up to 5 other volunteer teachers (own room, share bathroom with hot water, electricity, fully fitted kitchen, furnature and facilities, including maid, satellite tv and computer with internet), long term visa, and a small allowance that is sufficent to live on.

If you seriously consider teaching at GYA cannot stress more the following facts -
1. it is not a school for poor children, rather the working class and middle class children with a few wealthy and a few poor children (sponsored). However, by providing the children with high level education, particularly English increases the number or 'ordinary' people who can attent university and take an active role in rebuilding Ethiopia.

2. you must be commited to teaching children first and foremost which means 10 month commitment to GYA and providing a positive and appropriate role model for the children. The Head of the school is Muslem and while the school opperates non-religiously cthere are a large number of muslem students and certain princliples remain.

3. GYA are schools in a 3rd world country and as such there are some teaching practices that are not the same, with more regimentation, less time allocated to creativity, immagination and play activities. However, there is also less agressive punishment with the main punishment used being 'on play at lunch time' rather standing facing the wall with hands raised. Even this is not enforced militantly.

I hope this has not been too daunting as I think that anyone with a commitment to teaching children and a desire to see another culture and country would enjoy their term at GYA. You do not need to be a hardened adventurer as Addis is city with many modern converiences, churches, hotels, restaurants, theatres, supermarkets, night clubs etc.

I do hope this helps

Leith
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hardingl



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Mon Jul 18, 2005 4:42 am    Post subject: More replies - check them out Reply with quote

Helen wrote in the topic "GYA, Ethiopia" dated 16th Feb 2005 reply by Afrogirl

Helen was working at the school for the past year.

One of the reasons why the 10 month commitment is stressed is because there have been teachers who have really wanted to travel rather than teach so have not fully committed to teaching for the duration.

Teachers know how disruptive this is for kids - to have their teacher leave part way through their studies.

Leith
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Mchristophermsw



Joined: 14 Apr 2005
Posts: 228

PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2005 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hear alot about GYA but it seems there should be some other teaching options in Ethiopia that has a decent renumeration package.

I know there is not alot of money teaching in Ethiopia but there should be somthing a little more $ competitive than GYA?

Any info would be appreciated.

Also I think GYA is a great school! and would be a great experience to teach at. So I want to make it clear that I am not putting the school down.
If I had the extra cash to not worry about $ then I would jump at the chance in a moment.

Blessings
Michael
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Yahoo Messenger
hardingl



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2005 9:36 pm    Post subject: Remuneration in Ethiopia Reply with quote

I looked at several teaching options while there that offered good remuneration and there are a few but you need to be a US citizen (which I am not) and others paid around 8000Birr (US$1000) per month but did not provide any other support ie accomodation etc.

Housing with hot water, power, phone is about 3000 (unfurnished) to 6000 (furnished) which you can share with others to reduce the cost. Then there is the internet, etc.

If you find better paying teaching jobs please let me know too!

Leith
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
David V



Joined: 20 Jul 2005
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2005 5:39 pm    Post subject: GYA and Ethiopia in general Reply with quote

Greetings everyone,
This is to all who are interested in GYA or Ethiopia in general.
I was a volunteer at GYA during the 2001/2002 academic year. To begin I would like to say that Ethiopia is truly the jewel of Africa! It's one of the only places in Africa where you really feel that the culture lives without all the western influence other countries have. As for GYA, my experience in the long run was very positive. The school has different campuses, the volunteer houses are nice and the stipend was well enough for life in Ethiopia. (the average doctor in Ethiopia doesn't make more than 1500 birr a month, the stipend was about that!) The school took care of all our work permits and visa's which is a real help.
As for how the school function, yes there is a emphasis on dicipline but that is how African schools function. The great thing is that as long as you cover the curriculum of the school you can teach in your own style and have full liberty. Ethiopians are concervative though and one must respect the host country (No mini skirts and showing body parts that need not be revealed!)
I would suggest to read up on Ethiopia's history, culture, festivals, go to an Ethiopian restaurant , talk with the people before you go. It makes it a whole lot more worth your patience when you reach there if you are really interested in their culture.
Feel free to contact me with further questions.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bopdjen



Joined: 23 Jun 2005
Posts: 4
Location: WA USA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2005 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey David V, I have recently been hired by GYA and I will be starting Sept 1. Right now I am looking for airfare overthere. Wonder if you have any suggestions. Specifically I would like to know if I can get in the country on a one way ticket? Any help would be apreciated. Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
kakoppa



Joined: 13 Jun 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:13 pm    Post subject: Teachig with IFESH Reply with quote

I see that most of these posting are from 2005, but someone did ask about teaching in Africa with IFESH, the non-profit organization based out of Phoenix, AZ, USA, and during the 2001-2002 academic year, I did. I had applied years before, was not accepted. Had some graduated coursework in adult ESL education and they hired me. They tend to match a teacher's skill set with the needs of a Sub-Saharan African country, and they sent me to Ethiopia. Best thing that ever happened to me.

IFESH is organized, fair, provides a lot of professional support, it's a legitimate and some feel presitgious organization that "walks the walk and talks the talk" in regards to building a bridge between the U.S. and Africa. The teachers in the Teachers for Africa program were encouraged to assess situations and needs at the colleges in which we worked and write proposals and grants to get money for starting school libraries, increasing female education, increasing HIV AIDS awareness, etc but without imposing western beliefs and attitudes (which, by the way, is hard to do)

After four years, I am still in touch with the 10 teachers I went to Ethiopia with - we are family to each other - and I am still in contact with the Ethiopia IFESH Country Director (one of the most wonderful educators you will ever meet) It's a credible organization and I would do it again. In fact, I hope to return to Ethiopia with them some day.

Hope that helps.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
honoraryabesha



Joined: 24 Jul 2006
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GYA is a well run school. There have been teachers who have not finished there contracts and there have been some who have. As far as those numbers, I'm not sure if GYA has ever had 8 foreign teachers at one time. Who ever said that it was a lot of work...was correct. But the Director works extremeply hard so it's not like she's asking somethign that she's not doing. But you can't beat the arrangement. The schools that pay more don't pay for housing (in most cases) and GYA does. And I mean...living in Ethiopia...you can't miss that oppurtunity. I was only there for 4 months because my wife got sick. But I plan to go back to GYA in about 6 months.

Any other questions?

H.A.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hardingl



Joined: 13 Feb 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Fri Jul 28, 2006 4:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are lots of good replies about GYA and they are a good mix of positive and negative. The 6 out of 8 figure is exagerated but it does reflect the moral requirements of the school. Some teachers were asked to leave because they were not setting a positive example to the children in dress, behaviour, manners or language (like swearing).

The school has discipline for the kids and also for the teachers.

Another reason (as mentioned in another post) is that some teachers expect to be teaching poor kids and GYA is a middle class school that is educating the future leaders of the country so needs a good level of english. Most of the poor schools I have visited (been in Ethio 6 times) do not teach much English - maths, reading and writing are a priority.

Finally some teacher come expecting a wealthy school that will 'look after' them but again GYA is a middle class and working class school. Some poor children attend on scholarships or sponsorship. The schools for the wealthy kids require teachers to hold degrees and good experience in teaching. They pay better but are less personal. THe students from these schools are headed for USA for further education and are unlikely to return to build their country.

I am sure you realise that I have a lot of respect for the GYA process and teacher selection criteria.

Check out the many posts about GYA in varions headings on this forum (search GYA) to get a rounded perspective

Leith
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Africa Forum All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC