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Vegan in Turkey

 
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mongrelcat



Joined: 12 Mar 2004
Posts: 232

PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2005 10:52 am    Post subject: Vegan in Turkey Reply with quote

is this an oxymoron or what?

i'm dying here
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dmb



Joined: 12 Feb 2003
Posts: 8397

PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2005 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know of 3 vegan shops. So I'll share with you.
There is one in Kalavi sok.(2nd right after the church on Istiklal)
One opposite Etap bar(street one before Vakko on the left)
and one here in Cihangir on Akarsu sok.(same street as Leyla, Porte and Smyrna)
Happy shopping Very Happy
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ghost



Joined: 30 Jan 2003
Posts: 1335
Location: Saudi Arabia

PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2005 12:46 pm    Post subject: Vegan in Turkey Reply with quote

You can be a vegan in Turkey, but it takes some organization and planning.

Ghost loved the 'Kuru Fasulye' in Turkey, and this was indeed somewhat of a staple in the ghost diet. There are also plenty of soups that you could use, and ghost usually started its day with a hearty soup and fresh bread. Kuru Fasulye are beans.....but they are cooked the long way, and not from a can....

Lunchtime saw ghost eat a lot of stuff like stuffed aubergines with a variety of side dishes (salads, more fasulye, etc...).

Assuming (as a vegan) that you cannot eat dairy products (including eggs) your choices are somewhat limited but you can still eat well. There are plenty of dishes which do not have meat. And there are also dishes with meat, which you can also ask the Lokantalar owners to create dishes without the meat, and of course, you can negotiate a cheaper price for the meatless dishes.

Many of the rice dishes (Pilaf) could be eaten without meat, and ghost often simply ate rice, beans with a side salad, accompanied by a delicious glass of cool Ayran

Ghost was not a vegan or vegetarian in Turkey, but still limited meat intake to 3 days a week, and still ate well on the meatless days.
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molly farquharson



Joined: 16 Jun 2004
Posts: 839
Location: istanbul

PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2005 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i thought kuru fasulye were made with a meat broth-- so you had better ask. And I suppose you have learned that what many Turks think of as vegetarian means without chunks of meat, though the dish could have been cooked with meat or meat broth. Dikkat!
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dmb



Joined: 12 Feb 2003
Posts: 8397

PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2005 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kind of related. I have met vegetarians who eat chicken and fish.
So I found this guide to fish in Turkey on mymerhaba.
Quote:
urkey being a country of which three sides are surrounded by sea has been a fish paradise for years. And they were so cheap and considered as “food for poor”. However due to improper fishing methods and considering the number of fish is unlimited unfortunately both the variety and quantity of fish has recently been decreased. Therefore most fresh and delicious fish are found in reputable fish restaurants causing them to be believed as “food for rich”.

Following are the list of fish still available and the season when they are the most delicious.

Barbunya (red mullet), from April to July

Çinekop (young of blue fish) after October

Çipura (gilt-head bream), all throughout the year. The most famous Aegean Sea fish. However recently it has been raised at sea farms, therefore you can meet both sea and culture Çipura. Obviously, sea Çipura is the most delicious.

Dil Balığı (sole) all throughout the year. Fried is recommended.

Fener balığı (angler fish) all throughout the year.

Gelincik balığı (rockling fish) from May to August. Also known as gaya fish among the Jewish community. With the belief that being the first fish eaten after starving at Sinai desert it is considered sacred. It is a tradition of Jews to cook this fish on Fridays.

Gümüş balığı (sand smelt) February, March

Hamsi (anchovy), from December to February. Although small, one of the most famous Black Sea fish. Delicious with various cooking styles such as frying, steaming etc.

İskorpit (scorpion fish), from May to July. Since it has poisonous thorns absolutely let the fisherman clean off.

İstavrit (horse mackerel), all throughout the year. It is very enjoyable to catch this fish during spring and summer on the pavements of Bosphorus coasts.

İzmarit (blotched picarel), from February to April. Again it is very enjoyable to catch this fish during spring and summer on the pavements of Bosphorus coasts

Kalkan (turbot), from February to April. A Black Sea fish. The ones weighing 4-5 kg. are eligible. For it has thick spine and fishbone always let fisherman clean off.

Karagöz (sea bream), all throughout the year. One of the most delicious fish of Turkish seas.

Kaya balığı (goby), all throughout the year.

Kefal (gray mullet) from January to March.

Kılıç balığı (sword fish), from August to April. One of the most delicious fish, but unfortunately it is almost impossible to find nowadays. Most fish served as Kılıç in the restaurants are shark or other white fish.

Kırlangıç (red gurnard), from April to September. One of the most precious fish soups of which is more than delicious.

Kofana (large bluefish), from September to January

Kolyoz (chub mackerel), from July to September

Levrek (sea bass), all throughout the year. This rare fish has recently been raised at sea farms; therefore you can meet both sea and culture sea bass. Of course sea levrek is more delicious.

Lüfer (bluefish), from September to January. The king of the Turkish seas.

Mercan (red sea bream), all throughout the year

Mezgit (whiting), all throughout the year. Can be seen on the stands of fish sellers almost every day.

Orfoz (grouper), all throughout the year

Orkinos (tuna fish), a kind of fish that cannot be seen on the stands of fishermen. They are used for canning purpose only

Palamut (bonito), from August to January. A black sea fish. Richer than other fish with vitamin A and D.

Sardalya (sardine), from July to October

Tekir (striped goat fish), from February to July

Torik (large bonito), from September to November

Uskumru (mackerel), from November to January. Once the most popular fish of Marmara! However now you can only find the imported Norwegian mackerel. Most of the fishermen try to convince you that chub mackerel they sell is mackerel. Don’t believe.

Zargana (garfish, garpike), March and April


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Baba Alex



Joined: 17 Aug 2004
Posts: 2411

PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2005 7:08 am    Post subject: Re: Vegan in Turkey Reply with quote

mongrelcat wrote:
is this an oxymoron or what?

i'm dying here

I have a vegan friend who been here for around 8 years, and he's not dead yet, so I dare say you'll be alright. Check time restaurant guide, then when you are in the vegan reataurants, ask them who their suppliers are.
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bron



Joined: 26 May 2004
Posts: 88

PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is possible, and it's possible to do it healthily -- I was surprised how *few* things had "et suyu" when I checked. But it's horrendously boring after a while. I broke down after a year. Embarassed
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dmb



Joined: 12 Feb 2003
Posts: 8397

PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2005 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I broke down after a year.
Couldn't resist an Iskender then? Or was it BK?
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bron



Joined: 26 May 2004
Posts: 88

PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The breakfasts were the worst for it, and the mezze... oh, that beyaz peynir... and the yoghurt mezzes... temptation on a platter...
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