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Teaching English in Philippines for Foreigners

 
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Monteaverde29



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Jun 20, 2005 3:28 am    Post subject: Teaching English in Philippines for Foreigners Reply with quote

Hi everyone I decided to post some infos regarding teaching ESL or TEFL or any other English Teaching in the Philippines for foreigners. OK information regarding teaching ESL in this specific Asian country is very complicated and does not exist for Foreigners who are willing to Teach here. I worked in the Philippine Department of Education for 2 years before moving back to Italy as an Intern for the Italian-Phil Exchange Program last 1999-2001. I worked in the Licensing Dept. for new teachers as a support in Clerical/Administration and some translation in the Italian Consulate in Manila. I've learned so much working in the country. Its weird but this is the country where I learned to speak English fluently by taking classes in language school and through exposure with the locals. OK Let me tell you this. Philippines does not hire foreigners or native speakers to teach their citizens ENGLISH compared to other Asian countries. Just because you are a native speaker with or without a degree that doesn't mean you can teach English in that country. I'm just being realistic in here. No jobs exist for foreigners who would like to teach in government or private run schools(Elementary, Middle, HighSchool or Higher Learning). You need to have a minimum Bachelors Degree in Language or English. College or University? You need a minimum of Masteral Degree in English with specific minors/majors.(Standard and Qualification is too high but salary is very little) If im not mistaken TEFL jobs are available for Native English Speakers in some Private Language Schools mostly in the big cities. The catch is most of the students your going to teach are International Students learning ESL in the country specifically Koreans and Japanese. (ESL studies in the country are booming very cheap). You may be able to teach in some International Schools like the British International School of Manila or the American International School. You cannot teach Filipinos ESL because almost the entire population started learning English since they were born. It was amazing since everyone speak the language fluently even when you travel to a very remote secluded areas compared to Italy wherein English is mostly spoken in Big Cities like Milano Rome or Venezia.Anyway, Its illegal to start working in the country to teach ESL with a nonvalid teaching license or workpermit. I've heard this issue almost everyday in the Dept. were I worked since they deal and track foreigners who were being reported by some locals who makes business by teaching. Workpermit is almost impossible to get because Philippine Immigration have a minimum quota for workpermits given to foreigners. I'm lucky since the Italian Govt. was the one who dealt with the Philippine Embassy to give our group permits to do the exchange program in the country. Let me know if you have any questions regarding teaching in the country ESL. Thanks!
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Tiger Beer



Joined: 08 Feb 2003
Posts: 754
Location: Hong Kong

PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2005 9:02 am    Post subject: Re: Teaching English in Philippines for Foreigners Reply with quote

Monteaverde29 wrote:
You cannot teach Filipinos ESL because almost the entire population started learning English since they were born. It was amazing since everyone speak the language fluently even when you travel to a very remote secluded areas

Definetely true for Visayas and Luzon.

I was seriously struggling in Mindinao.. particularly General Santos.. met my girlfriend's 100+ extended family at her Christmas family reunion.. and amazingly ZERO of them spoke any English at all. I was in shock!
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Sgt Killjoy



Joined: 26 Jun 2004
Posts: 438

PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:55 am    Post subject: Not really Reply with quote

The level of English is falling in the Philippines and at the current rate other Asian countries will overtake their lead in English unless something is done to curb it.
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Monteaverde29



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 7:03 pm    Post subject: Re: Not really Reply with quote

Where is your proof? I taught Italian in Bangkok and Seoul in University and I still can't compare their level to the English level in the Philippines.

Sgt Killjoy wrote:
The level of English is falling in the Philippines and at the current rate other Asian countries will overtake their lead in English unless something is done to curb it.
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Monteaverde29



Joined: 17 Jun 2005
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 7:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Teaching English in Philippines for Foreigners Reply with quote

I agree with you but compared to other SE Countries almost everyone can speak and understand it. Yes they may be some accent but I was able to communicate with almost everyone.. I went to Zamboanga in Mindanao and they speak Spanish there.

Tiger Beer wrote:
Monteaverde29 wrote:
You cannot teach Filipinos ESL because almost the entire population started learning English since they were born. It was amazing since everyone speak the language fluently even when you travel to a very remote secluded areas

Definetely true for Visayas and Luzon.

I was seriously struggling in Mindinao.. particularly General Santos.. met my girlfriend's 100+ extended family at her Christmas family reunion.. and amazingly ZERO of them spoke any English at all. I was in shock!
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KarenB



Joined: 20 Sep 2005
Posts: 227
Location: Hainan

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the info above. I found it very helpful and timely, as my husband wants to move to the Philippines for two years for a study program. I have a Master's degree, but not in English, and I've heard that there's a huge unemployment problem in Thailand, so there's heavy job competition.

Can you give any info on cost of living in the Philippines? We'd be living in the Quezon City area of Manila if we go.
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ghost



Joined: 30 Jan 2003
Posts: 1299
Location: Saudi Arabia

PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 8:39 am    Post subject: Philippines Reply with quote

Ghost is a regular visitor to the Philippines (especially now, since living and working in Taiwan is just a 1.5 hour plane ride to Manila from Taipei).

The cost of living in the Philippines depends on where you stay. If you stay in Manila rentals can be expensive for foreigners because rentals there cater to executives who work in Makati - and can afford $1500 for furnished (luxury style) apartments.

If you want to live cheap - options are available.

You can stay in cheap hotels long term - which cost around 400 pesos per day (about $7.70 U.S.), or you can do what ghost has done - move out of Manila.

Ghost stays in a medium sized city in the Province of Laguna and pays 300 pesos a day for accommodation (about $5.80 U.S.). Meals in Provincial places (and even Manila) are super cheap. Ghost usually spends around 35-40 pesos for full meals in the Philippines (0.67-0.77 cents U.S.) - these are meals like 'pancit' or 'chicken mami' or any of the specials at Jollibee or other restaurants like that.

The only problem as a foreigner in the Philippines is that as a foreigner, you will be expected to pay for many beers and meals - because other Pinoys and Pinays are basically poor and have little or no cash. This can add up over time.

Ghost loves the Philippines, and would work there, but there are basically no jobs for EFL/ESL teachers there, unless you teach at one of the International schools.

Ako, masyadong maraming kaibigan ng Philippines.....Pinoy, ako, Pinoy!

Ghost in Taichung, Taiwan.
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william wallace



Joined: 14 May 2003
Posts: 2869
Location: in between

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 5:16 pm    Post subject: Pinoy... Reply with quote

nil

Last edited by william wallace on Fri Nov 23, 2007 2:39 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Sgt Killjoy



Joined: 26 Jun 2004
Posts: 438

PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 2:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

I agree with you but compared to other SE Countries almost everyone can speak and understand it. Yes they may be some accent but I was able to communicate with almost everyone.. I went to Zamboanga in Mindanao and they speak Spanish there.


They do not speak Spanish in Zamboanga. They speak Chavacano in Zamboanga City. Chavacano is based on Spanish but has some notable differences and it should be noted that the younger crowd speaks a form of Chavacano that is a lot less Spanish. (ie I can understand my mother-in-law, but when my wife speaks Chavacano, forget it!)

My grade 8 pupils here in Thailand, at a government school in the south, speak as good of English as my grade 8 nieces and nephews in the Philippines. My wife's family is typical middle class family in the Philippines, the older the member, the better English they have.

I find it strange that anyone would be disputing the fact that the level of English is increasing in Thailand while the level of English is decreasing in the Philippines. I can post plenty of links to prove these points, but I really don't think it is needed.

Does Thailand have a long ways to go to catch up with the English level in the Philippines? Sure, but when the students who are in the lower grades now start to teach the younger kids, it will really take off.
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