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Argentina Visas

 
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hagal19



Joined: 14 Apr 2009
Posts: 7
Location: Travelling

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:07 pm    Post subject: Argentina Visas Reply with quote

Hi
Can anyone help me to clear up the issue of work visas? It is my understanding that you need a work visa to teach in Argentina but that some companies will hire you if you have a tourist visa (that you renew every three months by crossing the boarder). Can anyone tell me which schools in Argentina will hire teachers without work visas? Does this loophole apply to Australians?

Thanks for the help, sorry if someone has already asked this question
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SAILO



Joined: 02 Apr 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been interviewing in BsAs at institutes for the past 2 weeks and none of them require work visas. I'm pretty sure that teaching on a tourist visa is the norm here, unless you've been contracted by a government or private school (not a language institute).
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hughesie



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 63

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You work illegally - which is what most EFL teachers in Argentina do. Nobody really cares but remember though on the other side of the coin you have absolutley no rights and the money is crap so bring savings.

You will get classes and they will dry up for whatever reason and you will get privates and sometimes the students change their mind on a whim etc etc - there is no solid ground to teaching English in Buenos Aires unless you are lucky enough to land a plum gig at IH Palermo.

If you do a year in Bs As then you are doing well - any longer and it will start to eat up your sanity - take it from me! Crying or Very sad
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spanglish



Joined: 21 May 2009
Posts: 583
Location: working on that

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hughesie - IH Palermo is a good place to work? Any other details to share/sources? I'm possibly interested in working in that area.
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hughesie



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 63

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spanglish wrote:
hughesie - IH Palermo is a good place to work? Any other details to share/sources? I'm possibly interested in working in that area.


Yeah mate, the IH in Palermo and the other IH school (San Telmo I think..) seem to be the top drawer language schools to work for in Buenos Aires but everyone wants to work for them as they do provide visa support and accomodation. I didn't work for them. Probably the best way to go about it is to work for a IH school in Colombia and get an internal transfer to Buenos Aires but from what I have been told is that most teachers want to work there so it is hard to get in.

Getting work in Buenos Aires was pretty easy when I was there - I am not sure now how everything is with this recession but the market is there. You will be illegal unless you get hooked up with IH though having no visa is not a problem from an immigration standpoint but be prepared for work to be took from under your feet like a rug - I was surplus to requirements many times at a moments notice, it is the nature of the beast over there - also - accomodation is very expensive if you aren't legal - you will need a local guarnator to rent anywhere but there are landlords who will rent to foreigners at extortionate prices.

Good things about Buenos Aires is that it is very safe, very art nouveau - very 1920s feel about the city and if you go on the blue line - they still have the original old wooden trams running with the wooden seats - an experience and a half! The people are very nice and they seem to love visitors to their country. everyone is nice - even the bouncers in the nightclubs are nice! Its a great place but you need a few quid for anything long term.

Probably the best thing to do is get with IH and try and transfer to Bs As after a year. Another way is to go to Korea and save around two years worth of money and then go over to Argentina and live like a king!
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spanglish



Joined: 21 May 2009
Posts: 583
Location: working on that

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think your Korea advice is the best. Oh well, I'll probably stay in Latin America anyway.

I'm getting excited about Argentina and Buenos Aires, so I'll do some research on IH there.
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hughesie



Joined: 22 Apr 2008
Posts: 63

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spanglish wrote:
I think your Korea advice is the best. Oh well, I'll probably stay in Latin America anyway.

I'm getting excited about Argentina and Buenos Aires, so I'll do some research on IH there.


I was two years in Korea and saved a small fortune so if you want to fund a couple of years in Buenos Aires then thats a good idea - being American - you'll get a decent public school job in Seoul - South Korea is not for everyone but all you have to think about is Puerto Madero on a warm January evening and that will make it more tolerable. Very Happy

One thing that does happen in Argentina is that they hold regular immigration amnesties for illegals - a poster on here by the name of 'matttheboy' took advantage of one two years ago (a forum search might unearth the post) and if you could do the same - you can make a decent life out there. Getting legalised is the big battle - once you do -
you'll do fine.
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Sabine11



Joined: 01 May 2006
Posts: 111
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2010 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
You work illegally - which is what most EFL teachers in Argentina do. Nobody really cares but remember though on the other side of the coin you have absolutley no rights and the money is crap so bring savings.


The entire esl scene in Buenos Aires is very shady and based on 'illegal ways'.. language schools won't put in the money to resgister themselves properly and sponsor their foreign teachers like they should.

If you want to work here and survive for longer then 1 year, do like I did and change sectors.. There are jobs here that will get you a work visa, but I had to sacrifice my tefl career in order to live here legally (I've been here 3 1/2 years), until I leave the country..

You proabably won't last tefling in Argentina for longer than a year, because of the visa issue..

Suerte, S.
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jodo77



Joined: 04 Sep 2010
Posts: 1
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:08 pm    Post subject: how to maintain that tourist visa Reply with quote

Hello, i am heading to BA in November to take CELTA certification at IH and I'd like to stay and teach in BA for another 8 months or so. Can someone tell me specifically what one needs to do in order to renew the tourist visa? How long must one stay across the border before it's kosher to re-enter? Any suggestions on the cheapest way to do this? Can I simply head to Uruguay for a day or two?
Finally, I'm flying in on a round-trip ticket and I plan to simply change the return date depending on how long I'm able to stay. I'm assuming that my return ticket should originally be dated for return within the initial 3-month period in order to gain entry without any visa hassles. Can someone confirm? This will be my first teach abroad experience. How do folks typically handle the open-ended ticketing issue?
Thanks!
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72308



Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 29
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That info is useful to me too, so thanks Smile
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