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is it worth it?

 
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meloush



Joined: 27 Mar 2015
Posts: 4
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 7:36 pm    Post subject: is it worth it? Reply with quote

I'm going to graduate with a Bachelor of Science (Ecology) in June.
If I do the fall semester, I will be able to upgrade a minor in Linguistics to a major. Will it be worth it in the long term?
Trying to factor in fewer jobs available January, tuition cost, etc.
I will have completed my Celta by then.
Looking to end up in Hong Kong or Dubai (though I won't have a B.Ed, so I know this is perhaps a pipe dream).
Please let me know your thoughts.
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 10365
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a tough call for the UAE. A TESOL-related MA and several years of experience is required for the limited university foundation positions left in the Emirates, and for k-12/international schools, the push is for licensed/certified teachers with experience gained in their home countries.

Instead of focusing on ESL, you'd be better off pursuing the qualifications and experience in Canada to teach elementary or secondary school science before heading to the UAE as a science teacher. (Check out actual job ads on Teach Away's and Seek Teachers' sites.)
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 1292
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In Canada, it is quite difficult to become a certified teacher without the original BEd - in general, a minimum of an additional two-year program after the original non-BEd is required. The fast-tracks/exams that exist in the USA don't really exist up here. Even substitutes require a BEd in all provinces except Ontario, I think. I think you'd be better off with heading to Hong Kong. I would also strongly consider the linguistics major if you plan to continue teaching in the long-term. It is a desirable degree to teach adult ESL in Canada.
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meloush



Joined: 27 Mar 2015
Posts: 4
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, it's a 2 year B.Ed program for us, unfortunately.
Both my parents had cancer and one passed while i've been in university, and my grades have suffered tremendously - I would likely have a hard time getting in to a B.Ed program, here, they are very competitive.

Thanks for the advice re. Linguistics major.
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cassava



Joined: 24 Feb 2007
Posts: 175

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

santi84 wrote:
In Canada, it is quite difficult to become a certified teacher without the original BEd - in general, a minimum of an additional two-year program after the original non-BEd is required. The fast-tracks/exams that exist in the USA don't really exist up here. Even substitutes require a BEd in all provinces except Ontario, I think.


The information is not quite correct. In Ontario, substitute teachers are hired from the vast pool of highly-qualified, unemployed teachers. Their tenure is precarious at best, since their only chance of teaching a class comes when the regular teacher is unable to be at work.

Indeed, many substitute teachers end up acquiring more qualifications than their regular classroom counterparts. The subs labour under the illusion that by getting more degrees, certificates and diplomas they will improve their chances of employment. By the time they realize that they have been living in a fool's paradise, it is too late. They find themselves competing with younger and younger teachers until the day comes when even their contract as a substitute teacher is terminated and they are unceremoniously dumped on the growing heap of the unemployed.

If you do a study of people living in poverty in substandard housing in large urban Ontario centres, you will be shocked to find many people with advanced academic degrees who blindly followed their passion, but lacked the common sense to know when to make changes in their careers.
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santi84



Joined: 14 Mar 2008
Posts: 1292
Location: under da sea

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the clarification cassava.

I was under the impression that subs in Ontario were a legal exception, but I really can't imagine Ontario being so strapped for qualified teachers that they would have to resort to non-qualified teachers.
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JoThomas



Joined: 08 Jan 2017
Posts: 144
Location: China

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cassava wrote:
santi84 wrote:
In Canada, it is quite difficult to become a certified teacher without the original BEd - in general, a minimum of an additional two-year program after the original non-BEd is required. The fast-tracks/exams that exist in the USA don't really exist up here. Even substitutes require a BEd in all provinces except Ontario, I think.


The information is not quite correct. In Ontario, substitute teachers are hired from the vast pool of highly-qualified, unemployed teachers. Their tenure is precarious at best, since their only chance of teaching a class comes when the regular teacher is unable to be at work.

Indeed, many substitute teachers end up acquiring more qualifications than their regular classroom counterparts. The subs labour under the illusion that by getting more degrees, certificates and diplomas they will improve their chances of employment. By the time they realize that they have been living in a fool's paradise, it is too late. They find themselves competing with younger and younger teachers until the day comes when even their contract as a substitute teacher is terminated and they are unceremoniously dumped on the growing heap of the unemployed.

If you do a study of people living in poverty in substandard housing in large urban Ontario centres, you will be shocked to find many people with advanced academic degrees who blindly followed their passion, but lacked the common sense to know when to make changes in their careers.


I don't think it is all black and white. I substitute taught in Ontario a number of years ago and there has been some changes as well in the last few years. There are many retired teachers who also substitute teach. You do have to be a qualified teacher with a B.Ed, and also have an interview with the board you want to work in just to get on the substitute list. I don't know if all people as you mention fit into one category. As for myself, after I graduated from teacher's college and couldn't find a full-time job, I substitute taught for a few years before realizing I could be supplying for awhile. I guess I didn't want to be one of the ones just adding onto my qualifications waiting for a great job. I decided to go abroad instead. Now, I know many people who still aren't working full-time and working either substitute teaching or on a 1 year contract (maternity leave). The job situation isn't overly rosy in Ontario. Substituting a lot you will make decent money though. The question as to how often you get called depending on what board you are at (how many schools) and how many other people are on that list.
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Knedliki



Joined: 08 May 2015
Posts: 136

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just out of curiosity, why don't you want to work in the field of your degree? I know jobs in ecology, conservation and so on are quite competitive but they definitely beat TEFL in my opinion.
A few people on this forum have found niche positions for themselves that they like to project as normal. But most TEFL jobs are dire.
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ttalapp



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 8
Location: China

PostPosted: Sun Mar 05, 2017 2:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am in similar situation. After couple of years in Korean ESL market, a bunch of us decided to go back home and get the proper teaching license. My marks were too low to get into a Canadian University to get my B.ED. So i opted to go abroad, Buffalo, to get certified. It was expensive, but necessary step. I knew that my goal was to come back to Asia, and find a proper international gig. Everyone in the teaching world was telling me how hard it is to find a job in Ontario. That was 8 years ago and situation is not really improving. In any case, after completing teaching degree, i went straight to Thailand. And then... i wish i would have stayed in Ontario to get some classroom experience. But, slowly and surely, i made a progression towards working in international or rather semi-international schools and finally made my move to China. Now, that was the right move!
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creeper1



Joined: 24 Aug 2010
Posts: 439
Location: New Taipei City, Taiwan

PostPosted: Sun Mar 05, 2017 5:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ttalapp wrote:
But, slowly and surely, i made a progression towards working in international or rather semi-international schools and finally made my move to China. Now, that was the right move!


Not sure if you are being sarcastic with the "now that was the right move" comment.

So I take it you are not working at a real international school but one that only has Chinese students.

If that's the case then it's certainly far from clear that getting the teaching credential was "worth it" as I know many uncertified teachers working in such schools.
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ttalapp



Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 8
Location: China

PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Everybody needs to be qualified at my school, otherwise it wouldn't pass the annual inspection. Its certified by BC, Canada. Kinda like those Maple Leaf Schools. And it is in Yunnan, bonus in itself. So no, I am not being sarcastic.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 14888
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Tue Mar 07, 2017 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only true desperados make a career of EFL. I was one such. Not a career for the faint-hearted or the squeamish.
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Wayland



Joined: 08 Oct 2013
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EFL isn't that bad of a career choice. But you do have to be smart. You have to always be looking at what the next step is. Make those connections and don't burn your bridges.

I've seen a lot of teachers who wind up with no land to stand on because they can't get along with foreign managers and end up burning every connection available to them. They end up with a resume with no recommendations to speak of and only the bottom-of-the-barrel jobs to work for, even after 20+ years of teaching.

Have a goal in mind and work towards it, but always keep you options open. I've kept my ear to the ground, and even though I'm just in my first 5 years of this career and have already climbed the ladder to a good degree.

I think the people who claim EFL careers are deadends or difficult are people who never had a plan to start with. Maybe it was more difficult 20 years ago, but I find it much more workable than many deadend careers my friends are trapped in back home.
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bograt



Joined: 12 Nov 2014
Posts: 265

PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I think the people who claim EFL careers are deadends or difficult are people who never had a plan to start with.


They also tend to be people who have problems with authority. Which is often why they got into TEFL in the first place.
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