Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

English First

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Russia & C.I.S.
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
waxwing



Joined: 29 Jun 2003
Posts: 719
Location: China

PostPosted: Sun Oct 19, 2003 7:00 am    Post subject: English First Reply with quote

hello again,
jobhunting.. Smile
Any relatively recent experience with this company in Russia? Any comments? I can't find anything in the JIJ ..
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1007
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Mon Oct 20, 2003 12:54 pm    Post subject: E.F. Reply with quote

Sorry to say it,but it seems they are no better to work for than the other larger schools which always have vacancies!Although the salary offered looks better-I think it was around $850-900 a year or two ago,you have to find your own accomodation from this,so you are back to the same measly amounts as the others pay!!And nowadays,it is expensive and difficult to find an appartment in Moscow for much under$400-500 per month,even in outlying suburbs,unless of course,you have a close Russian friend who can do a deal with a landlord and then you will pay about half to two-thirds of that amount!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
jeremyschaar



Joined: 30 Oct 2003
Posts: 3
Location: Moscow, Russia

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2003 6:34 pm    Post subject: A month of experience Reply with quote

Hello all, I am a new teacher for EF English First in Moscow and I wanted to post some of my thoughts after a month. I think they'll be helpful.

On salary, as of today, my boss told me that for a native speaker it won't be below $900/month. It, of course, varies based upon experience and education. I have a B.A. in Philosophy and a TEFL certificate from a Cambridge equivalent school and I make more, but you'll have to negotiate it for yourself.

On finding a flat, mine costs $400/month. You can find cheaper flats, I'm told, but that's the best that was available for me after a couple weeks of searching. By the way, we used an agency, but my boss accompanied me to all the places. Anyway, I'm happy with it. Its very large and after a little bit more cleaning and a few repairs will be fantastic. Its certainly bigger than the last place I was living in the states, and considering utilities are much less expensive (maybe $20/month for everything including phone, but I haven't got the first bill yet, so no promises), its actually just a bit more expensive than my place in Madison, WI.

Assuming a salary of $900 and rent of $400 that would leave you with a minimum of $500/month for everything else. My sense reading these boards is that people think that that's maybe enough to scrape by on. I strongly disagree. On the contrary, its really plenty. I mean, its not enough to feed a family, but if you're here by yourself- no problem. Food is really very inexpensive. A loaf of bread costs, like, $.30 and in general I've found an average trip to the grocery store is about half what I paid in the states. The point of that is that if you spend $30/week on groceries you'll be spending a lot. Let's assume $50/week though. I don't think most people spend that in the states. That's $200/month for food (plus $400 for rent, and tops $60/month for utilities) leaves you with $285/month for everything else. That's $71/week for drinks at the bar, cds and such, which are either about the same or less than what I paid back home. Hardly scraping by, and it assumes a lot. I've been spending about $15-20/week on food. If you limit yourself to $50/week for fun you're saving $80/month even assuming lots of maxes. I've been spending $65/week on everything (including food) and have found money in my wallet at the end of every week. OK, enough math, but I think this gives you a pretty good idea. Decide for yourself whether this means scraping by or living fine.

~~~

On English First, my schedule has been great. I, essentially, teach every weekday from 4-9pm. Other people do work on Saturdays and split shifts though. You shouldn't be surprised if you need to. They hold tight to 25 real teaching hours a week. And its all in one building. I teach all teenagers, but many others teach adults as well. It seems like the most common is a mix of some sort.

Finally, the people in the organization have all really treated me very well. Depending on your specific school you will certainly have a unique experience, but as for mine it really has been fantastic. My boss has been incredibly helpful. From accompanying me to find dishes and such at a less expensive store to arranging an unfortunately necessary doctor appointment and even promising to help me find a chess club once my Russian improves a bit. It has been a great experience. The people I have met at the main office have also been friendly and wonderful. Everyone seems free for a drink. I didn't see that coming.

All in all, a great start.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
waxwing



Joined: 29 Jun 2003
Posts: 719
Location: China

PostPosted: Sun Nov 02, 2003 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, Jeremy, first I should say thanks for making such an effort with that post! Laughing

Second, it seems we have a bit in common - I'm going to start teaching with EF, but not in Moscow, the week after next. (I'm going to Stavropol - I would be interested in people's thoughts about that...). What's more, I'm a chessplayer too Wink

Your financial calculations look pretty sound to me (I've spent a couple of months in Russia now). It is indeed purely subjective as to whether $900 is enough. You won't die, anyway Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1007
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2003 3:48 pm    Post subject: My advice,be careful in Stavropol! Reply with quote

For similar reasons to those in Georgia,although perhaps less so from a safety point of view,I would be VERY wary anywhere in southern Russia as a foreigner much further south than Krasnodar at present-ask your embassy before travelling!

M.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
maruss



Joined: 18 Mar 2003
Posts: 1007
Location: Cyprus

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2003 11:27 am    Post subject: ef salaries Reply with quote

Well I'm glad you are happy working for such a salary-with your qualifications,they are very lucky to have you anyway!But when you deduct your rent,it means you are working for around 400 $ per month-B.K.C. and L.L. pay around the same or in fact a bit more,and this is why both myself and many other people strongly object to this kind of exploitation,especially in Moscow where even a lot of Russians are nowadays earning far more than you-and remember you are working split-shifts as well,which means effectively 10-12 hours a day of your time is occupied!Personally,to come and work in Russia and tolerate the stress and cold weather,as well as the health damage from environmental pollution in a place like Moscow,I would want to save a MINIMUM of 1000$ a month!!And many ex-pats there have told me that any salary under 2000$ nowadays is nothing worthwhile,especially if you are paying for your own rent etc.
I would be interested to read your comments and good luck!

Martin.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
dez



Joined: 02 Jul 2003
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2003 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeremy: $80 a month? You must be relatively young or independently wealthy to be satisfied with banking less than $1000 in a year. Or perhaps you are only doing this for a year long experience or something. I don't know. It sounds like you are satisfied and having a good time. I wish you well.

As far as I'm concerned, this is my career. I can't be banking that paltry sum when I'm not even working on a pension in my home country. That's why I'm in Korea now and will remain in countries that pay to teach English. I would love to live in Russia. Maybe I will do a camp there sometime as an aside but I certainly can't afford a career there. I need to be able to purchase a home when I return to Canada at the very least.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rogan



Joined: 03 Mar 2003
Posts: 416
Location: at home, in France

PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2003 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

4 years ago the AAFL were paying me $1700 but I paid $650 for an appartment
Then I moved and paid $450

At other times I worked with LL and was paid $750 plus a rubbish room

I wanted to be in Russia and I was prepared to make a few sacrifices.

Now I work for what I can get and I negotiate (very carefully) the extras - accomodation, flights, visa renewal costs, paid holidays etc etc

Young, inexperienced, desperate people can also do the same.

For info contact grundie@mail.ru
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jeremyschaar



Joined: 30 Oct 2003
Posts: 3
Location: Moscow, Russia

PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2003 11:25 am    Post subject: young Reply with quote

I am young (24), and no this isn't about a career for me. (at least right now). I agree that if your priority is to buy a house, or you need to support a family, or something like that, than this isn't for you. I just wanted to dispell the feeling that you'll be suffering over here at those salaries.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dez



Joined: 02 Jul 2003
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2003 6:07 pm    Post subject: Re: young Reply with quote

jeremyschaar wrote:
I am young (24), and no this isn't about a career for me. (at least right now). I agree that if your priority is to buy a house, or you need to support a family, or something like that, than this isn't for you. I just wanted to dispell the feeling that you'll be suffering over here at those salaries.

Fair enough. I'm 36. When I return home I need to be in a certain financial position. Good luck to you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dez



Joined: 02 Jul 2003
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2003 6:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rogan wrote:
4 years ago the AAFL were paying me $1700 but I paid $650 for an appartment
Then I moved and paid $450

At other times I worked with LL and was paid $750 plus a rubbish room

I wanted to be in Russia and I was prepared to make a few sacrifices.

Now I work for what I can get and I negotiate (very carefully) the extras - accomodation, flights, visa renewal costs, paid holidays etc etc

Young, inexperienced, desperate people can also do the same.

For info contact grundie@mail.ru

Is there some reason that I got no response from this e-mail address? I would be very interested in such info.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anitka



Joined: 16 Feb 2003
Posts: 8
Location: Russia, Moscow

PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2003 9:36 am    Post subject: Strange... Reply with quote

That's very strange to read that expats in Moscow earn such a meagre sum! I've come across many cases when people pay up to 50 USD for 90 minutes session with a native speaker. I, being a non-native speaker teacher of English, earn more than 1000 USD a month and I see that I can earn even more. So, having read all this, I wonder why you come to work in Moscow for such little money? Nothing personal, just an interest...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
waxwing



Joined: 29 Jun 2003
Posts: 719
Location: China

PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2003 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the Russian input Anitka (you didn't actually say you were Russian, but it seems probable Smile )

Indeed it is a curious business. I am one of those expats working for a low salary .. although not in Moscow. I saw it as a 'way in' .. I won't have a chance to save money this year, but I get a lot of things I might not otherwise get; for example, a chance to learn Russian (and I really am learning now), to make some friends here, understand the culture and .. get the kind of inside knowledge about visas, salaries etc. that we discuss on these boards.

You describe yourself as a 'non-native speaker teacher' but don't forget that you *are* a native - of the country in which you are teaching (if my first assumption was correct Smile ). That means you have advantages as well as disadvantages. Your knowledge of language, culture, business and contacts is infinitely more than mine if I'm considering a job in Russia while living in England.

The big chain schools operate on the premise that there will always be 'green' people like me around willing to just try it out, and who aren't particularly bothered about salary in the short term. Personally I'm not sure there's anything so wrong with that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Russia & C.I.S. All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC