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Employment as an ESL in Greece

 
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eclipse86



Joined: 12 Jul 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 3:14 pm    Post subject: Employment as an ESL in Greece Reply with quote

Hello,

I am new to the forum so this is my first post. I have been contacting various advisors from Via Lingua in both Crete and Corinth and have some questions about what they are telling me. One suggestion they had was "cash-in-hand" employment or to strictly live off of private sessions, is this a wise choice? And if anyone reading this is supporting themselves this way, are you making enough to live comforatably? Are you reporting it on your W-2s?

Thanks.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9311
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ESL means English as a Second Language. You can't work as one of these!

Do you have citizenship in an EU member country: can you work legally in Greece?

I ask because it sounds a little shady that you're being advised to consider under the table employment (ie. cash-in-hand, privates).

Basically, you are talking about tourist centres. Most of the locals who need English in these places have a functional level already - and they are far too busy during tourist seasons to bother with lessons even if they don't.

Establishing yourself in terms of making a living on private students takes a lot of time in the area: you will need a local reputation and contacts, and probably local language skills.

Take a step or two backwards. Where can you work legally? You'll need to start out with a school if you are actually going to support yourself.
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12098
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hate to think what it might be like working as a gringo 'wetback' in Greece. Don't do it.

Wages are low enough for legit ESL teachers. I wonder how low they will be for scab labour.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9311
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2007 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The question I'd ask is whether Via Lingua staff are actually ADVISING potential trainees to work under the table, when they've got a possible trainee who can't work legally in Greece.

(I am assuming that the OP does not yet have a certification from his/her lack of understanding of what ESL stands for)
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Old_Liz



Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Via Lingua website certainly implies that working in Greece would not be a problem, and that salaries are generous ... I wonder how many prospective customers of Via Lingua do NOT bother to check out the legalities and the realities before shelling out their money?

I quote from http://www.teflgreece.com/faq.html

As an American, Canadian, Australian or New Zealand teacher, the opportunities vary enormously from country to country. Greece is the biggest TEFL-teaching market in the world. In Germany, Italy or Portugal, finding work is generally easier than in Spain or France. Many non-EU (also many British) teachers elect to first gain some valuable experience by teaching in Eastern Europe for 6-12 months before trying to break into the EU market Prague is a favourite starting location. Once you have one or two decent references on your CV/resume, many more doors will open up.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9311
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wattaloadacrap!

Maybe this is one of the sources of all those newbies who think basic qualifications and a little experience can get them into a country that simply doesn't legally give work permits to non-EU English teachers - like Spain, Italy, Germany, and France.

This list of countries where it's supposedly possible to find work is absolutely misleading.

I would also like to see some statistics to back up this 'fact' that Greece is the biggest TEFL-teaching market in the world!!

In my opinion the sales pitch below is fraudulent, and will certainly mislead newbies who don't do their own homework.
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Old_Liz



Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree entirely - I think sites such as that one are quite possibly to blame for the misconceptions that so many people have.

But why on earth would anyone believe the blurb - especially the bit about Greece being the biggest EFL market in the world? Surely even an imbecile (or at least an imbecile who could count the fingers on his hands) would be able to see that is total and utter nonsense!

Do these people do NO basic research about the countries they are hoping to learn and teach in? Additionally, I have to wonder what else about the school is fraudulent ...
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9311
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be quite honest, I was loosely connected with the original Via Lingua course as it got underway in Prague, circa 1999/2000 and was acquainted with the then-owner (s). I have no idea whether any of the same individuals are still connected with the course. The Greece centre may be a pure franchise, too, I've no idea.

I can say that the original training course itself was decently put together, and that management was, well, kinda typical of a broad range of private language schools...a few good points, some bad stuff.

Anyway, your point about anyone being so foolish or gullible as to go for this kind of information, particularly if you're considering upping stakes and jetting off halfway around the world on your own- well, you could consider that someone like this deserves what they get.

But I've still got a soft spot for starry-eyed youngsters who can get themselves into hot water so easily, without anything other than the best motives...
even when they flame me occasionally for being 'negative' and 'discouraging.' I remember some girl who cut me off on a thread about how she could get legal work in some place impossible like the Netherlands by saying that "only HELPFUL posts were welcome on HER thread - not negative ones!!"
I hope the she went there and found out for herself. Too bad she didn't post her findings.
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CPS1116



Joined: 09 Sep 2005
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I also contacted both centers before choosing to take the course in Crete. I was told by Corinth that it was possible to get a job in Greece with the Via Lingua Certificate and a university degree. Sara, the director in Crete, told me something very different. As an American, she said it would be very difficult to find legal work in Greece. I appreciated her honesty and turned out she was right... but it was a chance to live in Greece and teach there and she helped me to find a job outside of Greece after the course. Also, I was never ADVISED to work for "cash in hand" but I was told that some people stay and do that. But it was never suggested as a form of advice, just an alternative but the risks were explained. Crete is run like a school, not a big business, and the staff seem to care about the future of their students, not just make money. Anyhow, that was my experience and, though I didn't get a job in Greece, I wasn't really expecting to and was glad I knew what I was getting into.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9311
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I want to bump this thread up in response to some current questions about whether Via Lingua can help get North Americans legal working papers for Greece.

They can't.
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Crash! Bang!



Joined: 27 Jan 2007
Posts: 11
Location: indiana

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

anyone (in addition to CPS) have concrete, first-hand experience? any non-EU taken the course and gotten a job in greece (or other Western European nation)? or not? i have seen several posts that were positive, and several negative. what i really want are cold, hard facts
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9311
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 2:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look in the Greek Embassy website (Washington, DC) for current law as it pertains to non-EU English teachers.
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digitaux



Joined: 30 Oct 2007
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a non-EU over here now and the going is rough. Luckily, I may have found an editing/proofreading post at a local newspaper, but the teaching market is grim.
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Old_Liz



Joined: 11 Jun 2007
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a Greek-Australian friend who went to Greece a year ago.

Until her Greek citizenship came through she could NOT find any salaried positions at all, despite being (a) a graduate primary school teacher (b) a holder of CELTA with lots of experience (c)speaking fluent Greek and (d)having local contacts.

She supported herself with private work until such time as her citizenship came through - when she promptly took up a post teaching in England, for which she is legal via her Greek passport, and qualified via her Australia B.Ed.
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