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Global ERS
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hollyl1003



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 7
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 3:25 pm    Post subject: Global ERS Reply with quote

Hey all,

I have been looking at Global ERS to find a job in a Mexican private school (I don't want to work at an institute) and I was just wondering if anybody has been placed with them/have more information. Their application is rather intense, so I am just looking for some more information before completing it.

Thanks!
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dixie



Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Posts: 644
Location: D.F

PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why donīt you just contact the schools on your own? That is how most get their jobs, and if Global charges (as I would imagine they do) then you save yourself money.

Now is the time to contact schools as well, as the year resumes in August. Exact dates depends on the schools, but some start as soon as the 4th, others the 18th.
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Radhagrrl



Joined: 16 Jun 2003
Posts: 24
Location: Dark Side of the Moon

PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been using them and they seem OK. I'm overseas and I wanted to try and find a job before I got the Mexico, so this seemed a good way. They don't charge the teacher, either, so you're not spending anything by going with them.
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FilCan



Joined: 06 Jul 2008
Posts: 10
Location: Puebla, Puebla Mexico

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:41 pm    Post subject: global ers Reply with quote

I registered with them in 2005 when i got here, but only until now they have given me something. they take a while to respond and find you a job. better if you come and look for yourself.
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aroha



Joined: 08 Oct 2004
Posts: 66
Location: Mexico

PostPosted: Fri Jul 25, 2008 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Applying for jobs through agencies has worked out well for me. I think the key is to make initial contact with the agencies, and then once you have booked your flight, ask the agency to organise interviews with any potential employers.

In February this year, I got in touch with Global ERS while living overseas. In May, I arrived in Mexico City with a job lead for a high school. I had an interview the week I arrived, and the school offered me a full-time job starting in August. No cost involved in finding the job.

When I came to Mexico in 2004, I also had a job lead from a different agency and that also turned out to be a good teaching position at a middle school. From memory, that particular agency charged $20 for registration.

If it increases your chances of finding a job and doesnt really cost anything, then why not go through an agency?
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caballo



Joined: 06 Apr 2008
Posts: 39

PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 12:53 am    Post subject: Global ERS and Colegio Mt. Rushmore in Tepotzotlan. Reply with quote

I do not recommend Global ERS. They sent me to Colegio Mt. Rushmore-a small private school in Tepotzotlan. I remained in the position of English instructor for just three months before resigning. The problem with the school is inept management and their failure to have and implement a code of conduct for the school.
Upon arriving, it was obvious that the role of the foreign teacher/native speaker was not clear. I taught one-third of the time in the primaria and two-thirds of the time in the secundaria. The foreign teacher at this school does not have his/her own class. He/she spends one hour weekly with the primaria classes and two hours weekly with the secundaria classes.
My boss told me to just 'play' with the students in the primaria during our weekly one-hour classes. Well, I didn't want to just 'play' with the students. I wanted to actually teach them so I met with their full-time teachers to plan lessons based on the target grammar and vocabulary and the needs of the students. The students in primaria were generally well-behaved and they wanted to learn. The kids were warm and friendly. I managed to do okay with them because of my lesson planning and weekly meetings.
The situation in secundaria was much worse. There weren't any texts, so my supervisor listened to my suggestion and ordered the texts I requested. But it was obvious from the start that there were serious discipline problems in the school. Students whistled, spoke Spanish, threw pencils, and constantly asked for permission to leave the classroom to use the restroom. They often failed to bring pencils and paper to class too. They didn't listen to instructions and generally failed to apply themselves. I wrote a letter about the situation and sent it to the school administration.
I had hoped that something could be done to improve the situation. But the management of the secundaria didn't want to accept the fact that a problem existed. There was no code of conduct. Students pretty well did as they pleased. One student-the daughter of the head of secundaria-didn't believe that it was impolite for students to whistle during class! The students even entered the teachers' room at will as there was no sign or rule to discourage them from doing so. I had to give most of one class a detention early in my tenure and the management took the side of the students. Because of their failure to act, I had problems with this same class on two subsequent occasions. But instead of dealing forcefully with the situation, the management generally took the side of the students.
One of the worst students-in terms of behavior-at the school was the son of the owner. He acted like a manager and management at the secundaria usually indulged him. On at least two occasions this child watched as all the other students participated in a sport or other physical activity. He didn't want to participate so he didn't-as simple as that.
As I realized that the situation was not going to improve, I gave the school three weeks'notice and told them that I would not be back for the second session. At that point, I realized that the school had violated the contract by not even attempting to acquire my FM3. My papers had never left the school's office and they were returned to me the next day!
I asked them when I had to leave the school's apartment and they said I could stay as long as I liked. Then later I was abruptly given a letter informing me that I had five days to vacate the apartment. I had not yet even bought a plane ticket so I had to scramble to do that and wrap up my other affairs before leaving.


Last edited by caballo on Sun Feb 01, 2009 8:08 pm; edited 1 time in total
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aroha



Joined: 08 Oct 2004
Posts: 66
Location: Mexico

PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 1:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It sounds like you had a horrid experience in Tepoztolan. Unfortunately, the administration of private schools in Mexico seems to vary widely in their expectations about student behaviour, and you can see that when you read about other people's experiences while teaching in this country.

Nevertheless, there are good private schools out there! I was lucky to get a job (through Global ERS) in a well-run school in Mexico City with respectful students who generally have a pretty good attitude. However, I wouldn't have expected Global ERS to know whether or not the school was well-run, nor would I hold Global ERS accountable for the school's delays in processing my work visa.

Hope things are working out better for you now!
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dixie



Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Posts: 644
Location: D.F

PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

aroha wrote:
It sounds like you had a horrid experience in Tepoztolan. Unfortunately, the administration of private schools in Mexico seems to vary widely in their expectations about student behaviour, and you can see that when you read about other people's experiences while teaching in this country.

Nevertheless, there are good private schools out there! I was lucky to get a job (through Global ERS) in a well-run school in Mexico City with respectful students who generally have a pretty good attitude. However, I wouldn't have expected Global ERS to know whether or not the school was well-run, nor would I hold Global ERS accountable for the school's delays in processing my work visa.

Hope things are working out better for you now!


Perhaps I misunderstand the role of Global ERS, but why would anyone pay them money to find them a job in a horrible work environment?

Sadly, that description is not an uncommon one in schools. Being that parents pay for their students to attend schools, and being that that schools want as many paying students as possible, teacher support is not always available.
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john_n_carolina



Joined: 26 Feb 2006
Posts: 700
Location: n. carolina

PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2008 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

...i agree with Holly - there was a serious conduct problem there. i probably wouldn't hold ERS responsible as they must have hundreds of contact schools.

one unique way i solved some of the discipline problems with a class similar to yours was just talk to the few good students and ignore the rest. that's sort of how it is in the U.S. also. you only have 3 or 4 actual serious students.

anyways, there are hundreds of books on class management and it really involves the whole picture (director, class size, homework, method, seating, discipline, etc ) all the way down to the families.
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aroha



Joined: 08 Oct 2004
Posts: 66
Location: Mexico

PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 3:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Global ERS doesn't charge you for placing you in a job, as Radhagrrl also mentioned earlier in the thread.
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Prof.Gringo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1931
Location: Paradise, Paradise, Paradise!

PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 4:25 pm    Post subject: Re: Global ERS and Colegio Mt. Rushmore in Tepotzotlan. Reply with quote

caballo wrote:
I do not recommend Global ERS. They sent me to Colegio Mt. Rushmore-a small private school in Tepotzotlan. I remained in the position of English instructor for just three months before resigning. The problem with the school is inept management and their failure to have and implement a code of conduct for the school.
Upon arriving, it was obvious that the role of the foreign teacher/native speaker was not clear. I taught one-third of the time in the primaria and two-thirds of the time in the secundaria. The foreign teacher at this school does not have his/her own class. He/she spends one hour weekly with the primaria classes and two hours weekly with the secundaria classes.
My boss told me to just 'play' with the students in the primaria during our weekly one-hour classes. Well, I didn't want to just 'play' with the students. I wanted to actually teach them so I met with their full-time teachers to plan lessons based on the target grammar and vocabulary and the needs of the students. The students in primaria were generally well-behaved and they wanted to learn. The kids were warm and friendly. I managed to do okay with them because of my lesson planning and weekly meetings.
The situation in secundaria was much worse. There weren't any texts, so my supervisor listened to my suggestion and ordered the texts I requested. But it was obvious from the start that there were serious discipline problems in the school. Students whistled, spoke Spanish, threw pencils, and constantly asked for permission to leave the classroom to use the restroom. They often failed to bring pencils and paper to class too. They didn't listen to instructions and generally failed to apply themselves. I wrote a letter about the situation and sent it to the school administration.
I had hoped that something could be done to improve the situation. But the management of the secundaria didn't want to accept the fact that a problem existed. There was no code of conduct. Students pretty well did as they pleased. One student-the daughter of the head of secundaria-didn't believe that it was impolite for students to whistle during class! The students even entered the teachers' room at will as there was no sign or rule to discourage them from doing so. I had to give most of one class a detention early in my tenure and the management took the side of the students. Because of their failure to act, I had problems with this same class on two subsequent occasions. But instead of dealing forcefully with the situation, the management generally took the side of the students.
One of the worst students-in terms of behavior-at the school was the son of the owner. He acted like a manager and management at the secundaria usually indulged him. On at least two occasions this child watched as all the other students participated in a sport or other physical activity. He didn't want to participate so he didn't-as simple as that.
As I realized that the situation was not going to improve, I gave the school three weeks'notice and told them that I would not be back for the second session. At that point, I realized that the school had violated the contract by not even attempting to acquire my FM3. My papers had never left the school's office and they were returned to me the next day!
I asked them when I had to leave the school's apartment and they said I could stay as long as I liked. Then later I was abruptly given a letter informing me that I had five days to vacate the apartment. I had not yet even bought a plane ticket so I had to scramble to do that and wrap up my other affairs before leaving.


Your experience is by far much closer to being the norm in a private colegio in Mexico than it is to being an exception . Many schools are like the one you mentioned. It's good to remind people how things are really like teaching kids, especially with hiring for the new school year starting.
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ls650



Joined: 10 May 2003
Posts: 3484
Location: British Columbia

PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I taught at a university in Oaxaca state for three years and it was a great experience. I had a couple of friends, though, who taught students in a local colegio, and their experiences mirror those of 'caballo': unruly students, no discipline, weak and unsupportive administration, etc. ... and they made half the salary I did as a uni profe!
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aog5003



Joined: 16 Feb 2009
Posts: 14
Location: Puebla, Mx

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been placed with Global ERS and it has been great. I did not need to pay a fee because the schools generally pay the fee to find good, foreign teachers. I think every Mexican private school has its own issues, but none of these issues are related to Global ERS. Also, the woman who hired all of us English teachers is someone we can contact if there are any problems between the foreigners and the Mexican teachers. It has been a great experience. Hope that helps!
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robertokun



Joined: 27 May 2008
Posts: 199

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Global ERS will get you a job from abroad with no charge to you. The school pays them for each teacher they hire from them. I think it's like $300. Since they recruit for private "prestigious" international schools that cater to the "elite" class, your experience will very likely be like Caballo's. Mine certainly was. If you want one of those jobs, though, they're a good way to get one
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Mexicobound



Joined: 09 Apr 2009
Posts: 120
Location: In Texas but ready to roam again

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

robertokun wrote:
Global ERS will get you a job from abroad with no charge to you. The school pays them for each teacher they hire from them. I think it's like $300. Since they recruit for private "prestigious" international schools that cater to the "elite" class, your experience will very likely be like Caballo's. Mine certainly was. If you want one of those jobs, though, they're a good way to get one


Did you go through Global_ERS?
Where were you teaching?
What subject(s) did you teach?
What age were your students?
Have you taught in any other countries?
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