Site Search:
 
Get TEFL Certified & Start Your Adventure Today!
Teach English Abroad and Get Paid to see the World!
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Advice on findng teaching jobs in Germany (esp. Stuttgart)
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Germany
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
bellevie



Joined: 06 Mar 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 7:16 pm    Post subject: Advice on findng teaching jobs in Germany (esp. Stuttgart) Reply with quote

Hello Germany forum,
I am seriously thinking about moving to Germany and need some advice on finding ESL/EFL work in Germany-the Stuttgart area in particular.
Fortunately, I'm a trained teacher-Masters in Teaching TESOL plus 4 years teaching, 2 years being in a university. However, I don't know much about the European job market.
I would love any and all advice (positive and negative) on finding work in Germany!
Good schools to research? Is it realistic to find a job from the US or best to move there and then find work? What are my chances of finding work (being American) in a language school, university or other?
I would appreciate any advice or any other things I should consider/avoid.
Thank you! Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11514
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where you're from is a relevant bit of info - if N. American or Australian, it's more difficult for you to get a legal work visa for Germany. This narrows your options to a university that may want you enough to jump through the legal hoops on your behalf - or dooms you to freelance work that pays peanuts.

If UK, you're far more viable.

However, either way, remember it's a tight economy. I work at a uni in Netherlands, and we, like most these days, are seeing cuts - not new hires!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11514
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, sorry - now, I see U.S.
Above advice applies - going to be tough to find anything above subsistence level in '09, even with your quals (I have similar + 10 more years experience than you, and know many in similar positions).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bellevie



Joined: 06 Mar 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2009 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hmm...I've been doing research on this, and I'm not sure if you're 100% right. I'm looking for actual advice, not discouraging comments.

I'm hoping to get some replies from teachers and expats who live in Germany and are working there..especially those of you in the Stuttgart/Baden-Wurtemmberg area.
Thank you, I look forward to hearing your thoughts and advice.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hod



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 1613
Location: Home

PostPosted: Sat Mar 14, 2009 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spiral78 told it like it is, I’m afraid. Along with all this economic nonsense, since 1 January 2009, Germany has gone way over the top regarding “proper” health insurance, which is now a requirement for any sort of work permit. This madness will hopefully end, but right now you are looking at paying €150 a month minimum health insurance for a fine specimen in their twenties or thirties. It’s not an impossibility, of course not, but the message has to be bring plenty of cash. Viel Glueck.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tefl_john



Joined: 15 Dec 2008
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's encouragement you want, you have come to the wrong place. English lessons are more or less a luxury in Germany, or at least are seen as such by companies. With the recession biting, the TEFL market is taking a bit of a thumping and work is slowly drying up.

I don't come from Stuttgart, but I can imagine that with the high number of companies being in the automobile sector (either as manufacturers or suppliers), the market is even more depressed than elsewhere. I certainly haven't seen any jobs being advertised in that region.

Add to that the fact that you are not an EU citizen, then I would seriously suggest that the situation is not positive for you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BerlinCELTA



Joined: 15 Feb 2008
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 8:35 pm    Post subject: Contact ELTAS - the local teacher's association Reply with quote

Hi,

I don't live in BW myself, but I know that the local teacher's association - ELTAS - is large and active. I'd contact them to get more locally relevant comment.

This is the URL for their website - click on the "committee" tab to find some people to get in touch with.

http://www.eltas.de/data/

Hope this helps.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bellevie



Joined: 06 Mar 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks BerlinCELTA for the suggestion
I have been in touch with them and some of their members have been really helpful.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bellevie



Joined: 06 Mar 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've actually seen a few job advertisements from a few language schools like Wall Street, Berlitz, Accelingua, Inlingua etc.
I've never worked for a language school so if you have any information on these schools, I'd like to know your opinion. From what I've read on this forum and others, working for a language school doesn't sound very good, but every job has its ups and downs. Looking forward to hearing your thoughts. Thanks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hod



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 1613
Location: Home

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tefl_john wrote:
If it's encouragement you want, you have come to the wrong place. English lessons are more or less a luxury in Germany, or at least are seen as such by companies. With the recession biting, the TEFL market is taking a bit of a thumping and work is slowly drying up.


If a non-EU person wants it enough, they can relocate to Germany. Most posters on here are negative towards anyone wishing to do so, and the economic thing gives even more ammo. There will always be freelance teaching work. The Arbeitsamt (employment office) even make it compulsory for the unemployed to attend courses such as English – so there´s more work for teachers straightaway thanks to economic gloom and doom, woohoo.

But unless you’re married to an EU person, the paperwork is gonna be soul destroying. I wouldn’t go through it. There are other forums, mentioned on here, which deal with this in more detail. Based on my knowledge, though, a non-EU citizen wanting any sort of residence permit/visa must have:

1. Decent German – staff at the Foreigners´ Departments just don´t speak English. This is daft, but we’re talking low-grade civil servants.

2. Health Insurance – this went a bit awry from 01.01.2009. Anyone can google this lot:

Versicherungsvertragsgesetz (Insurance Law)
§ 193 Para 3
Jede Person mit Wohnsitz im Inland ist verpflichtet, bei einem in Deutschland zum Geschäftsbetrieb zugelassenen Versicherungsunternehmen ... eine Krankheitskostenversicherung...
(Every person with residence in Germany must have health insurance with a company approved to operate in Germany.)

It´s open to interpretation, e.g. who is approved to operate in Germany anyway? But you must show health insurance details as part of the visa application, and travel insurance will 99.9% certainly be rejected. This is not a major problem – you just get insurance in Germany.

3. Loadsa money
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Shaytess



Joined: 12 Oct 2006
Posts: 65
Location: Berlin

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 5:11 pm    Post subject: Making it as an American in Germany Reply with quote

I, too, was STRONGLY discouraged from moving to Germany by fellow Dave's ESL Cafe members, and I posted about my entire experience on here about a year ago.

I worked as a freelancer in Berlin for about 14 months, at 3 different schools, when one of them offered me a full-time job.

It took 2 months to get the full-time work permit and visa approved, but here I am, manager of a language school.

SO - it CAN be done. (Although I think full-time jobs are exceedingly, exceedingly rare.) I personally know dozens of American freelance English teachers in Berlin, and while they are obviously not rich (because what English teacher is?) they are not starving, either.

About health insurance, I got private UK insurance (NOT travel insurance), which worked just fine in Germany - I had to pay all my expenses up front, but they were always reimbursed in a timely manner by my insurance company. I will be happy to recommend you the name of the company if you PM me. It cost approximately 120 Euros per month.

About what you would need to bring with you when you move - I did, indeed, save money for about 3 years before I moved here. I needed most of it : ) AND I had a free place to stay for the first year. I would recommend bringing plenty of money to live off of COMPLETELY for 6-8 months, and also I would come prepared with a place to stay at the beginning (Try couch-surfing? Or craigslist?)

To start as a freelancer, it took me about 4 months after arriving to do all the work permit process, get hired at 2 different schools, and develop a 'full' schedule of classes (i.e. enough to live on at a base level).

It's true that the economy is taking its toll on the demand for English teaching, but there IS still significant demand, at least in my branch of ESL (Business English).

As a freelancer (and same for my freelancer friends here), I worked at 2 or 3 'chain' schools such as Berlitz, Accelingua, Inlingua, etc. They are NOT that bad to work for - average pay 13-17 Euros to start. Of course, it probably depends on the branch in your city and who's running it : )

The paperwork to make it here IS rather demoralizing, but you DON'T have to be fluent in German as long as you can get (or pay) someone to help you - I imagine you could get someone to help you in exchange for free English lessons, or tandem partnership.

If you want it enough, and you plan it right, and with a bit of luck, you can make it happen. I did, in spite of all my Dave's ESL Cafe 'well-wishers' : )

GOOD LUCK!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Hod



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 1613
Location: Home

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shaytess wrote:
About health insurance, I got private UK insurance (NOT travel insurance), which worked just fine in Germany


You quote the laws, but someone still knows better. The Insurance Law quote I pasted about Germany-approved insurers came into affect on 01.01.2009. That paragraph 3 didn’t exist before.

I’ve just been through this with a non-EU applicant at the foreigners' department this week. A policy from a UK insurance company, when presented at the Auslaenderbehoerde, will with 99% certainty now be rejected, however comprehensive it may be. This isn’t insurmountable, but I wouldn’t go paying for a UK/USA policy, because you’ll have wasted the money if it’s not accepted. There are Germany-approved insurances which are listed on the other forum mentioned on here. Luckily, these have a 14-day cooling off period, during which you can make a visa application.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
escuto



Joined: 15 Mar 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bellevie wrote:
I've actually seen a few job advertisements from a few language schools like Wall Street, Berlitz, Accelingua, Inlingua etc.


These schools are almost always hiring, and usually not for a good reason. On balance working for a language school can be a good way to get your foot in the door, particularly if you're non-EU. Take advantage of the resources they have to offer and build contacts, but otherwise don't expect a cheerful existence. The pay isn't good and the language school administrators in Germany are often just as pitiful and/or deceitful as anywhere else in the world unfortunately.

If you've already got your routine down and the paperwork is taken care of, then consider approaching firms directly. Those that haven't drastically cut down or stopped their language training altogether are certainly interested in saving money where they can, so many are willing to forgo middleman services. But if you're still somewhat new to the country and don't have the solid references to boot, then it might be difficult to land something. Offer to do a few demo lessons or be willing to work for a more modest wage than you otherwise hoped for. Do what you have to in order to make your services more attractive.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
puhutes



Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 46

PostPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2009 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It also depends on how old you are. It could be that USA also has the same deal like in Canada... check with your local German Embassy. I came to Germany in 2007 with a "youth visa" available to any Canadian under the age of 35. Maybe USA has it too... Either way, it is actually a lot easier to come to Germany now than it was a few years ago. Germany is really always searching good English teachers. If you plan to come, I suggest you find a private language school (they normally pay more) or VHS (Volkshochschule) and not a chain like Berlitz. I've been teaching here close to 2 years and from word of mouth... I have direct contracts with people and companies. I now make generally between 35-65€ per 90min lessons. My language school pays me 35€, VHS usually around 40€ and my own direct contracts are around 50-65€. In the beginning it might be rough... but if you can get 2 or more classes a day from Mon-Fri... you can make around 2000€ or more a month.
Greetings Jennifer
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bellevie



Joined: 06 Mar 2009
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Shaytess, Puhutes, Escuto,

Thank you for your replies. Its nice to know there are realistic but nice people and teachers out there.
Thanks!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Germany All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2018 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Teaching Jobs in China
Teaching Jobs in China