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Non EU passport holder - Where to get a job?
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TeacherFromNZ



Joined: 04 May 2009
Posts: 3
Location: New Zealand

PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 7:47 am    Post subject: Non EU passport holder - Where to get a job? Reply with quote

Hi

I'm a fully registered primary school teacher from New Zealand. English is my first language but I also speak fluent Italian. I'd love to live and teach in Italy but due to strict regulations, this isn't going to happen.

Can anyone help me out with suggestions of countries (or schools) to teach in Europe where I will be able to get a visa and live/work. I don't really want to go to the UK. Croatia? Andorra? Somewhere I haven't considered yet. All help appreciated. Thanks
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9323
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 'new' EU member countries are generally still open to non-EU candidates (though exact laws vary by country). You could consider the Czech Rep, Poland, Slovakia, etc.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8944
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2009 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, new Eu countries. Poland might be possible. Although you can teach in the newer EU ones, and I've been looking, I was told that they still prefer people with EU passports or valid work permits.
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Hadit



Joined: 17 Sep 2009
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It would make sense to make a sticky explaining this issue of EU passport vs. non passport holders.

I've looked and read for about an hour on places where I as an American could gain employment, and have yet to come across a complete list. Maybe there should be a list of the countries with a periodically updated description of the feasibility or ease in which a non-EU passport holder may gain employment there.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9323
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the difficulty is that we are a loose collection of regular posters with knowledge about specific countries, and a general idea about the region.

Getting one comprehensive list with regular updates would involve organising quite a few disparate posters who may or may not have any other reason to keep current on visa laws.

You're probably more likely to get real current knowledge from training centres in-country - their staff have a real reason to keep current on the laws.
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Insubordination



Joined: 07 Nov 2007
Posts: 386
Location: Sydney

PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NZ has a Working Holiday Visa agreement with Italy, and other European countries, though you would need to be under 30. There are also some international schools in Italy which hire qualified primary teachers. I should think they'd be highly sought after, but it's worth looking into.
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Suyu



Joined: 29 Jan 2011
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Germany is relatively easy to get a work permit if you have a job offer.

With out a job offer if you can get at least two schools to give you a letter stating they would like to chance to give you work then you can register for a freelance visa and will normally get one.

Going for the second option will get you an open visa the first option will probably be restricted to the school which in itself is a contradiciton to German freelance laws??????
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JLS89



Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 9
Location: USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look into schools in Switzerland, Croatia, or Norway... Bulgaria was also recently admitted into the EU, but when I was there in summer of 2009, they were not using the Euro.
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hollysuel



Joined: 07 Oct 2007
Posts: 213
Location: Idaho, USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you can find a job with a language school/university that will sponsor your visa then you can go to any country. That is the problem, why would a language school spend their money sponsoring a visa when British/Irish teachers are a dime a dozen? Also, the language schools will hire non-EU teachers who are married to EU citizens so that they don't have to sponsor a working visa. If you do manage to find a school that would do it in the EU--it is like winning the lottery (which is very rare)! AND you would have to be very, very qualified and most likely more qualified than any of your peers. (I am one of the lucky few who got in this way, so it is possible, but very, very difficult.)
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andre818



Joined: 31 Jan 2011
Posts: 28

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hollysuel wrote:
If you can find a job with a language school/university that will sponsor your visa then you can go to any country. That is the problem, why would a language school spend their money sponsoring a visa when British/Irish teachers are a dime a dozen? Also, the language schools will hire non-EU teachers who are married to EU citizens so that they don't have to sponsor a working visa. If you do manage to find a school that would do it in the EU--it is like winning the lottery (which is very rare)! AND you would have to be very, very qualified and most likely more qualified than any of your peers. (I am one of the lucky few who got in this way, so it is possible, but very, very difficult.)


What if I spoke to the school and told them that I would pay for them sponsoring a visa for me? Will that work?
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8944
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

andre818 wrote:
What if I spoke to the school and told them that I would pay for them sponsoring a visa for me? Will that work?


YOu mean, you want to pay them so that they give you a visa? Or you want to cover visa costs?
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9323
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andy - good question, but the answer's unfortunately no - because:
It's not a matter of costs. The last time I got a specialist work visa, it was only about 75 euro - not a big problem.

BUT:

To overcome the 'EU citizen only' hiring law, the school has to show to its national government that you have qualifications no EU member citizen can match, and then petition for an exception to the rule in your case.

That's why, without specialist quals (or an EU member spouse) it just doesn't happen, outside of working holiday visas if you are eligible.

If I recall correctly, you're CELTA certified, with minimal experience so far, and no university degree. Schools in the EU won't be able to make a case on your behalf for specialist quals, if that's correct.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9323
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What it can take to get a 'exceptional' work visa - in my experience (hollysuel, maybe you can add to this?):

Related MA at least +

some speciality/skill/additional qualification that the institution needs
(these could be demonstrated by publication, conference presentations, etc).
and likely local contacts, particularly in more desirable locations.

Do keep in mind that there are a lot of UK holders of related MAs out there, so just getting the degree definitely won't guarantee you a shot at EU jobs.

Also, it may well matter what institution 'you' get the MA from - European universities and international schools get lots and lots of applications for any published opening (I can vouch for this!!) and the name of the university where you got your degree can help you to stand out - or not.
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markcmc



Joined: 18 Jan 2010
Posts: 232
Location: Taiwan

PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 3:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiral78 wrote:


To overcome the 'EU citizen only' hiring law, the school has to show to its national government that you have qualifications no EU member citizen can match, and then petition for an exception to the rule in your case.



Are you sure about this? I thought different EU countries handled this differently. Some, for example Germany & Portugal, are easier for a non-EU citizen, than others. I thought you only needed an employer to be willing to go through the hassle of applying for the visa, not that you have to prove anything about special qualifications.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8944
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2011 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

markcmc wrote:
spiral78 wrote:


To overcome the 'EU citizen only' hiring law, the school has to show to its national government that you have qualifications no EU member citizen can match, and then petition for an exception to the rule in your case.



Are you sure about this? I thought different EU countries handled this differently. Some, for example Germany & Portugal, are easier for a non-EU citizen, than others. I thought you only needed an employer to be willing to go through the hassle of applying for the visa, not that you have to prove anything about special qualifications.


I still think she's right. While they may be easier, in theory, you have to prove that you can do a job no EU-er can. That's what an employer willing to go through all the hassles has to do.
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