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A few questions about working in Paris from a newb....
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 5:37 pm    Post subject: A few questions about working in Paris from a newb.... Reply with quote

my whole reasoning for going to Paris is to go to the Sorbonne to learn french (Canadian gov't work-rather Paris than Montreal) French courses only take 2-4 hours in the morning, so i would be free from about 12 or 1 on. So how much could i be reasonably expect to work, in terms of hours per week? Assuming i have the certifications, and some experience, how many euro/ hour can be expected? Is it relatively simple to get private clients, assuming heavy advertisement? Lastly, i've browsed through here and have read of people saying finding an apartment in central paris (i want 4, 5, or 6 arrondissements) is almost impossible; yet i know of a site linked right from the Sorbonne website where they seem to have dozens of apartments available. What's the truth?
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riverboat



Joined: 22 May 2009
Posts: 116
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you look in the FUSAC magazine (fusac.fr) you'll see that lots of experienced teachers are advertising private English lessons in Paris, charging 15 euros per hour, with the first lesson free. So that should give you an idea of the hourly rate. In terms of how much work there is to go around...I don't know.

And re: apartments, its REALLY expensive if you want to rent a studio or one-bedroom place for yourself, not so bad if you want to look for a room in a collocation.
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

riverboat wrote:
If you look in the FUSAC magazine (fusac.fr) you'll see that lots of experienced teachers are advertising private English lessons in Paris, charging 15 euros per hour, with the first lesson free. So that should give you an idea of the hourly rate. In terms of how much work there is to go around...I don't know.

And re: apartments, its REALLY expensive if you want to rent a studio or one-bedroom place for yourself, not so bad if you want to look for a room in a collocation.


i'm budgeting at most 1500 euro/ month for an apartment...what's shocked me just looking into it is the gym costs-140 euro/ month. Shocked
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

riverboat wrote:
If you look in the FUSAC magazine (fusac.fr) you'll see that lots of experienced teachers are advertising private English lessons in Paris, charging 15 euros per hour, with the first lesson free. So that should give you an idea of the hourly rate. In terms of how much work there is to go around...I don't know.

And re: apartments, its REALLY expensive if you want to rent a studio or one-bedroom place for yourself, not so bad if you want to look for a room in a collocation.


wow, thanks for that FUSAC link looks like a terrific resource....also looks like I'll be fortunate to also have an EU passport....and workable french. Raises the pay level?
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riverboat



Joined: 22 May 2009
Posts: 116
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, well you'll be fine for getting an apartment then (for me, 1500 euros p/m is pretty much in the really expensive bracket). You'll be able to find a nice enough studio in central Paris for that.

By the way, I'm not sure if you were thinking of trying to find work in a language school as well as looking for private clients, but you could expect to earn around 18 euros p/h (before tax) teaching for a school. You'd probably be teaching business clientele. I've spent hte last two days here going round all the various language schools, have had some interviews and job offers, and 18 euros seems to be pretty much the standard hourly rate, though of course there is variation on either side depending on the school.
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

riverboat wrote:
OK, well you'll be fine for getting an apartment then (for me, 1500 euros p/m is pretty much in the really expensive bracket). You'll be able to find a nice enough studio in central Paris for that.

By the way, I'm not sure if you were thinking of trying to find work in a language school as well as looking for private clients, but you could expect to earn around 18 euros p/h (before tax) teaching for a school. You'd probably be teaching business clientele. I've spent hte last two days here going round all the various language schools, have had some interviews and job offers, and 18 euros seems to be pretty much the standard hourly rate, though of course there is variation on either side depending on the school.


what level of hours do they offer per week?

as far as taxes, i've read a few differing things: you just pay ~22% social security on site, that if you're over 28 you DONT pay the SS tax, that income tax is only charged for a foreigner if you're there i think it was 183 days in a calendar (Jan 1-dec 31) year-which i wont (Aug-May)...any idea what it is? Because the 1500 euro/ month is dependent upon salary and taxes obviously....also, any idea of day-day living expense? I'm figuring 1000 euro/ month for food and leisure...?
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riverboat



Joined: 22 May 2009
Posts: 116
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not really that clear on the tax situation yet, though I will obviously be finding out properly in the next month or so once I get my first paycheck here...I've heard different mutterings from various langauge teachers, some saying that ultimtately about 45% of what you earn gross ends up getting taxed (by a combination of social charges, social security, income tax and healthcare contributions).

RE: hours on offer, it depends on many things...all the schools are reliant on business clientele booking their services, and those bookings come and go over the course of the year, so the hours they'll offer you will pretty much be dependent on whether they've got lots of companies on their books at the time you walk through the door with your CV. I've been told by a couple of schools that February is the best time to look for full-time work here (in France thats 35 hours per week), as thats when schools are just about to enter their busiest periods.

In terms of living expenses...it depends what you want to do. A *cheap* two/three course meal in a restaurant, with drinks, will set you back about 25euros. A McDonalds meal costs about 6euros. A can of Coke will cost anything between 1euro and 2.50euros. A week-long metro ticket is 17euros. A sandwich is 3 - 4 euros. Most bars charge about 5 euros for a bottle of beer. A small coffee in a cafe is around 2 euros. I bought a week's worth of groceries (for myself, as a single person) the other day in a supermarket, and it cost me 50 euros.

If you really have 2500 euros per month to spend on living costs and an apartment, you won't have any problems at all. However, I don't know of any language teachers living here who make anywhere near that kind of disposable income every month. But maybe you have another source of income, and you were just planning on teaching here as a kind of top-up thing?
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2009 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

riverboat wrote:
I'm not really that clear on the tax situation yet, though I will obviously be finding out properly in the next month or so once I get my first paycheck here...I've heard different mutterings from various langauge teachers, some saying that ultimtately about 45% of what you earn gross ends up getting taxed (by a combination of social charges, social security, income tax and healthcare contributions).

RE: hours on offer, it depends on many things...all the schools are reliant on business clientele booking their services, and those bookings come and go over the course of the year, so the hours they'll offer you will pretty much be dependent on whether they've got lots of companies on their books at the time you walk through the door with your CV. I've been told by a couple of schools that February is the best time to look for full-time work here (in France thats 35 hours per week), as thats when schools are just about to enter their busiest periods.

In terms of living expenses...it depends what you want to do. A *cheap* two/three course meal in a restaurant, with drinks, will set you back about 25euros. A McDonalds meal costs about 6euros. A can of Coke will cost anything between 1euro and 2.50euros. A week-long metro ticket is 17euros. A sandwich is 3 - 4 euros. Most bars charge about 5 euros for a bottle of beer. A small coffee in a cafe is around 2 euros. I bought a week's worth of groceries (for myself, as a single person) the other day in a supermarket, and it cost me 50 euros.

If you really have 2500 euros per month to spend on living costs and an apartment, you won't have any problems at all. However, I don't know of any language teachers living here who make anywhere near that kind of disposable income every month. But maybe you have another source of income, and you were just planning on teaching here as a kind of top-up thing?


well i ran the numbers on taxes, the tax rate up to 25,927 euro is what ever SS is (i read 22%) plus 14% income tax. Above 25,927 the income rate rises to 52% including SS. Since i wont make appreciably more than 25,927 if any more, it makes sense to not make more than 25k. ie. at 26 k, i'm actually taking home much less than at 25k.

assuming 18 euro/hr for 25 hr/week, including about 10 hours /week of presumably untaxed private lessons, i came out to -1232 euro after 9 months. But i found a great place for 1200/ month, so saving 1800 over the course of 9 months, from the 1400/month one i'd seen before, including a presumptive return of damage deposit, i come out even or a bit ahead.

as far as living, i'm a bit of a health nut, so i wont be living based on the big mac cost of living barometer, and i dont drink coke/ soda anymore. I cant imagine the cost of groceries is too much more over there....is it? I'm also planning on having a 10k slush fund for shortfalls....
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Nmarie



Joined: 07 Jun 2006
Posts: 85
Location: Paris

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2009 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
assuming 18 euro/hr for 25 hr/week, including about 10 hours /week of presumably untaxed private lessons


It will not always work out this way if you plan to work for language schools. In most cases, you do not have guaranteed hours. One period can be great, and the next pitiful. There are rampant advance-notice cancellations (for vacations, meetings, whatever), for which you are not paid. Keep this in mind as you are calculating your earning potential. You also seem to be available only in the afternoons - 25 hours will be tough to achieve, and it will mean commuting to more than one business or client.
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riverboat



Joined: 22 May 2009
Posts: 116
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The prices I quoted for McDonalds / can of Coke were meant to be generally exemplary of the higher cost of living for EVERYTHING (not just junk food) in Paris. I don't know what the price of groceries is like in the US/Canada, I can only compare to the UK, but certainly groceries here are more expensive than I am used to.
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

riverboat wrote:
The prices I quoted for McDonalds / can of Coke were meant to be generally exemplary of the higher cost of living for EVERYTHING (not just junk food) in Paris. I don't know what the price of groceries is like in the US/Canada, I can only compare to the UK, but certainly groceries here are more expensive than I am used to.


moreso than London even? My grocery bill here is about $300-400/month which is about 190-250 euro....i'm budgeting 500 euro for food...if it's more than 2x as expensive, i'll be in over my head for more than just food...haha
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riverboat



Joined: 22 May 2009
Posts: 116
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2009 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm starting to get the impression that we are just used to very different standards of living (different budgets!) in which case we're probably talking at cross purposes!

All I can say is: I lived in London for five years before I came here to Paris, and yes, in general, most things seem more expensive here. I think that perhaps the difference is that it was quite easy to live on a modest budget in London because there were plenty of places (restaurants, shops, supermarkets) catering for people on a budget. Here in Paris, those places don't seem to exist. So yes, if you were to try to buy like-for-like, I think you'd find that nearly everything is at least slightly more expensive in Paris than in London (the forementioned can of coke for example, which is double the price or more nearly everywhere) and when you also factor in the fact that there aren't a whole load of "different" cheaper options to choose from...basically living on a budget is just really, really hard here. At least that's what I've found over the last two months!

Maybe it's just that I haven't found the right places to shop yet. That's an encouraging thought.
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Sep 05, 2009 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

riverboat wrote:
I'm starting to get the impression that we are just used to very different standards of living (different budgets!) in which case we're probably talking at cross purposes!

All I can say is: I lived in London for five years before I came here to Paris, and yes, in general, most things seem more expensive here. I think that perhaps the difference is that it was quite easy to live on a modest budget in London because there were plenty of places (restaurants, shops, supermarkets) catering for people on a budget. Here in Paris, those places don't seem to exist. So yes, if you were to try to buy like-for-like, I think you'd find that nearly everything is at least slightly more expensive in Paris than in London (the forementioned can of coke for example, which is double the price or more nearly everywhere) and when you also factor in the fact that there aren't a whole load of "different" cheaper options to choose from...basically living on a budget is just really, really hard here. At least that's what I've found over the last two months!

Maybe it's just that I haven't found the right places to shop yet. That's an encouraging thought.


i assume you mean you think i have a high SoL? haha...it's more like I'm 1.88m tall and weigh about 100kg, from weightlifting...point being, i need to eat a lot...Wink Good news is i dont eat junk food (McD's etc but also waste like cookies, soda, potato chips etc), bad news is whole grains, turkey breast, protein powder etc costs more than bologna and white bread...

I had just always heard horror stories of the cost of everything in LOndon, and had never really heard them about Paris...
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Hot2GlobeTrot



Joined: 01 Sep 2009
Posts: 82
Location: Calgary, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Sep 06, 2009 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i keep forgetting to bring this up, you seem to be as good a person to ask as anyone.....I'll be flying into paris then heading to cannes for a month then back to paris. I want to get a cell phone before i go to cannes. I've never gotten an international cellphone before, so forgive any stupid questions, but can i just go somewhere in paris, give them a credit card and be hooked up with a phone/ plan? Or do i need a bank account in country? any idea on rates?
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riverboat



Joined: 22 May 2009
Posts: 116
Location: Paris, France

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2009 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depends on the type of cellphone you want - a contract one, or a non-contract one.

With the former type, you get better rates but I believe that a French bank account and proof of a permanent address in France is required (I could be wrong, but this is my strong suspicion). For the latter (which I have), you can pretty much walk into a store and buy one. You do, however, need to supply your passport, which they will take a copy of. Strange, but true...this is standard practice when buying a cellphone in France apparently, not just for foreigners but for everyone.

With the no-contract phone, the standard rates are something like 50 centimes per minute (fixed rate, for calling either mobiles or fixed lines in France). Texts are about 20 centimes each. You buy a certain amount of credit each month (via vouchers available in supermarkets/post offices etc), and the credit lasts until you either spend it all on calls/texts OR the credit expires, which can happen before you spend it all. For instance, if you top up with 10 euros of credit, most of the time (depending on the network) this will expire in 15-20 days, unless you use it all up during that time. The bigger the amount of credit you buy in one go, the longer it lasts before expiry.

I'm with Virgin Mobile, because they have a special type of credit called "very long" that lasts longer, in terms of expiry dates, than any other network. You can top up with 10 euros, and it lasts a month. I don't use my mobile phone much, except for very short calls and texting, so this is ideal for me.
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