Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

etymology online - a link for you

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Kent F. Kruhoeffer



Joined: 22 Jan 2003
Posts: 2118
Location: 中国

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 8:53 am    Post subject: etymology online - a link for you Reply with quote

Dear Forum:

In Glenski's recent post entitled "Is Teaching English a Profession?", I alluded to an etymology dictionary that I often use, and thought some of you might find it useful.

Let me preface this by saying that I teach English in Russia, where students often ask really difficult questions about vocabulary and grammar. So...the link below is intended only for serious "nerds" of English; those EFL teachers among us who want to know more than just the standard dictionary definition. eg, where a particular word comes from, how it was used originally, and how it may have evolved into something completely different over time.

Ok. Here's the link:

www.geocities.com/etymonline/index.html

Have fun with it Exclamation

RegardsFromTheFrozenTundra,
Kent

PS: If you think this may be too boring or too academic for you, just take a quick look at the etymology of the word "feisty", for a good laugh. For those too busy to look for themselves, it originally meant "stinking, farting dog". Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Roger



Joined: 19 Jan 2003
Posts: 9138

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Kent,

a welcome tip, thank you! I am quite interested in etymologies.
Unfortunately, I cannot access geocities from China.

Lucky me, I have got an OXFORD, a Kluge Deutsches Etymologisches Woerterbuch and a Paul RObert Dictionnaire etymologique pour la langue francaise.

The word 'feisty' intrigues because of its pronunciation, but my OXFORD cannot enlighten me as to its exact origin! It claims it is from 'feist, meaning 'small dog'" Hilarious!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kent F. Kruhoeffer



Joined: 22 Jan 2003
Posts: 2118
Location: 中国

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 5:37 am    Post subject: "feisty" revisited Reply with quote

Hello Roger,

Sorry about your problems accessing geocities from China Exclamation

Ok, here it is: everything you ever wanted to know about the word "feisty" ... and a few things you probably didn't want to know.

First ...the modern definition, courtesy of wordsmyth.net: an adjective which means spirited, quick-tempered, determined, quarrelsome or touchy

Here now, the etymology, courtesy of the link in my original post:

feisty - 1896, Amer.Eng. from feist "small dog," from fice, fist Amer.Eng. 1805 "small dog," short for fysting curre "stinking cur," attested from 1529, from M.E. fysten, fisten "break wind" (1440), related to O.E. fisting "stink." The 1811 slang dictionary defines fice as "a small windy escape backwards, more obvious to the nose than ears; frequently by old ladies charged on their lap-dogs."

So Roger, maybe we should all think twice now before referring to our dear old grandmother as a "feisty old woman". Laughing She might have one of these dictionaries too.

Warm regards,
Kent
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Roger



Joined: 19 Jan 2003
Posts: 9138

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 5:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kent,
I loved your reply, dude! Just the right mix of erudition and amusement! That is what popularising an acadmic subject is all about! Thanks a lot!

Will in future never again use 'feisty' in reference to any old ladies - my grandmothers both can no longer 'break wind' anyway!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> General Discussion All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC