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55 age limit strictly enforced.
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bellygod



Joined: 02 Feb 2007
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 2:01 am    Post subject: 55 age limit strictly enforced. Reply with quote

I'm getting close to that age. Even though China has a shortage of teachers, would they really turn away a 55 year old, or can it be worked out otherwise?
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brsmith15



Joined: 12 May 2003
Posts: 1142
Location: New Hampshire USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I worked until I was 69 and then retired. I know of other FTs in their 70s.
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Laoshi1950



Joined: 22 May 2004
Posts: 198
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 2:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a 59 year-old Australian working at a key university in Beijing. An American colleague at my university here is 71 and another American teacher is 62. The 55 year-old age limit for teachers does not seem to be an issue at this university. Apart from having appropriate qualifications and teaching competence, the main interest appears to be that we are in good health.
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gregmcd101



Joined: 06 Jun 2006
Posts: 144
Location: Ireland (for now)

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 3:04 am    Post subject: Re: 55 age limit strictly enforced. Reply with quote

A guy came to my old university, 65, just retired, got offered that job and several others apparently. so he was a 65 year old newbie. i have come across numerous teachers in excess of this limit

bellygod wrote:
I'm getting close to that age. Even though China has a shortage of teachers, would they really turn away a 55 year old, or can it be worked out otherwise?
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kjk_esl



Joined: 02 Feb 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:28 am    Post subject: Age Limit Reply with quote

As far as I know and have read there is no age limit to getting a visa to teach or do other work in China. This age limit is something that is made up in a PSB office where they have all the power and make their own rules. I have seen teachers in China in their 70's working with Z visas. This age limit is a way of a school saying that " we did want you but now we don't" or the PSB office saying that "we have all the power and Beijing has none". If a school really wants you they can get around this issue easily enough. Apply to what schools you want to and enjoy China.
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tommchone



Joined: 27 Oct 2009
Posts: 108

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never heard 55, I heard 60. But there are many ways to get around it (legally).
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mike w



Joined: 26 May 2004
Posts: 1071
Location: Beijing building site

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I never heard 55, I heard 60. But there are many ways to get around it (legally).


Not necessary to get round it - an upper age limit for foreign employees does not exist.

This has been looked into by both my company, and a couple of lawyer friends (Chinese and foreign) and there is no legal retirement age or unemployable age for foreigners.

Some provinces push the issue because of the perceived risk of increased health problems with increased age, or they simply prefer younger teachers.

Some schools may push it for the same reasons, or simply as a ruse to get rid of someone.

But is has no legal basis.
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Chris_Crossley



Joined: 26 Jun 2004
Posts: 1797
Location: Still in the centre of Furnace City, PRC, after eight years!!!

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 8:36 am    Post subject: Being married to a local with at least one child may help! Reply with quote

My current colleague teaching English for Academic Purposes (EAP) on the pre-master's programme (PMP) I have been involved in for the past 4 1/2 years is 59 years old, but I should also add that, like me, he married a local and has a daughter.

I seriously doubt whether the PSB would refuse an expatriate with family in situ would refuse to grant a visa or else to refuse to extend the foreigner residence permit so long as the school wants to continue hiring him or her - otherwise the local spouse might pay them a visit and give 'em what for! Very Happy
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Zero



Joined: 08 Sep 2004
Posts: 1402

PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My sense is that the Chinese government has no interest at all in foreign/local marriages/families being preserved. If they did, they would allow them something other than Z visas (which have nothing to do with whether you are married to a local or have a family) and L "visiting relatives" visas. I wouldn't count on it being an advantage.
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Hansen



Joined: 13 Oct 2008
Posts: 737
Location: central China

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 1:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While the attention is on the PSB, don't forget the Foreign Affairs Office. Without the FEC, no residence permit. I have heard that the FAO at the provincial level is the place where older teachers are running into trouble in this province. I know that one older man was sent packing because of the age limit issue. His school wanted him to stay but the FAO of the province would not issue an FEC.

The PSB is not always to blame. Also, as always, people lie. It is difficult to get the truth. In the case above, I was told by a school FAO that the reason a replacement was needed was because the provincial FAO dumped the lao tou. True?
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Pelican_Wrath



Joined: 19 May 2008
Posts: 490

PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, if you have no job, but you've got a family in China, it's quite easy to get the other kind of one-year visa so long as you've got dosh in the bank
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A'Moo



Joined: 21 Jan 2007
Posts: 1067
Location: a supermarket that sells cheese

PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pelican_Wrath wrote:
Actually, if you have no job, but you've got a family in China, it's quite easy to get the other kind of one-year visa so long as you've got dosh in the bank

Out of curiosity, as its been brought up a few times, anyone have an idea on this figure (money in the bank)? Just want to know when I can quit teaching!!!!
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Zero



Joined: 08 Sep 2004
Posts: 1402

PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You don't need any money in the bank. It's an L visa. If you have a Chinese spouse, it can be issued for one year, renewable every year, indefinitely, without leaving the country. It is a "visiting relatives" visa.
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The Great Wall of Whiner



Joined: 29 Jan 2003
Posts: 4946
Location: Blabbing

PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just met an Australian gentleman in the Qiqihar "foreigner processing office" in his 70's and he said he could re-new his working visa but not get a new one.

I am pretty convinced that China does not have a set rule on this, or if they do it's either felxible or at the whim of local gangs--er I mean officials.
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Chris_Crossley



Joined: 26 Jun 2004
Posts: 1797
Location: Still in the centre of Furnace City, PRC, after eight years!!!

PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 8:46 am    Post subject: Having real estate helps, too! Reply with quote

Pelican_Wrath wrote:
Actually, if you have no job, but you've got a family in China, it's quite easy to get the other kind of one-year visa so long as you've got dosh in the bank.


And/or real estate.

I have just started repayments on the mortgage for my immediate family's second flat!

And, in case you're wondering, no, we're not even living in our "first" flat (so to speak) because my parents-in-law are after selling theirs!

We're still renting from one of my two sisters-in-law the same flat that we've been "temporarily" living in for the past 26 months! Shocked
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