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'Trans Cultural Education Services' in Hamamatsu: Fishiness?
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 7:39 am    Post subject: 'Trans Cultural Education Services' in Hamamatsu: Fishiness? Reply with quote

Mr. Naoki Muramatsu, the owner of TCES LTD. (Trans Cultural Education Services) in Hamamatsu of Shizuoka-prefecture, has contacted me about working in August. It sounds like a great position in exactly the kind of city and area I want to be in. I am going to be working in China (Yibin) until August and then I am going to be going directly over there if things work out.

It sounds like Hamamatsu is an excellent city and Muramatsu sounds like a very kind supervisor... except for one strange thing. I wrote him asking for emails of current and past teachers in order to find out information about working there and he said, "As of now, I hesitate to tell you the e-mail address of current teachers who are working for TCES. After we talk and agreed, I will ask you to talk with current full time teachers." This makes me suspicious that he has something to hide, so I did a little sleuthing (I typed "trans cultural education services" into google) and was lucky enough to find the resume of a current teacher. I have written him an email and am waiting for his response, but in the mean time, I’m worried.

Do you know of this school? Do you know how I can look up a school to find if it is legit? Also, I am mainly familiar with contracts in China. How does the below look like for a Japanese contract? Of course I am going to insist on the butt-saving clauses in my contract, exemplified in the contract I wrote for China: http://academy.phpwebhosting.com/paperwork/contracts/elizabeth/
And I now know to ask for less hours, so don’t look at that aspect of the Chinese contract.

What do you think? Is there anything that I should be aware of when checking out schools that are particular to Japan? Please read the following and let me know what you think. Thanks!

Here is the information he sent me about the school And in response to my questions regarding utilities, etc:

Name: Trans Cultural Education Services
T.C.E.S. is 10 years old and a small English school.
TCES has currently two full time sponsored English teachers and two part-time teachers and both full time teachers are living in the different apartments that TCES is contracting with landlord.

The terms of employment of T.C.E.S. Ltd. are the following.

* The sponsorship is available. (Work-visa will be issued)
* 5 days a week working system, Sundays and Mondays (or Saturdays and Sundays) are off.
* 25 hours/week x4 week=100 hours/month
* Monthly payment 250,000 yen/month is guaranteed.
* 1-year contract, possibly renewal.
* The teacher pays apartment rent, 48,000 yen/month and the utilities every month.
* Utilities
*Electricity, about 6,000 yen a month
*Gas cost, about 8,000 yen a month
*Water, about 3,000 yen a month
* Taxes: 10,420 yen
* Your cash, 175,000-yen or 180,000 yen remains.

* 3 times annually, Paid Holidays are there.
* Golden Week (from April 27th to May 5th 2003)
* Summer Break (from August 10th to Aug. 18th 2003.)
* New Years Holiday (from December 21st 2003 to January 5th 2004)
Students are ordinary working adults, kids, and company classes.
TCES compact car is provided to the full time teachers.
I would like the teacher to have an international drivers license since there are several companies on-site group classes in where teacher goes there to teach.

The apartment is the one TCES Ltd. is contracting with the landlord, so you do not have to pay any key or deposit money when you enter to live, and well furnished. A couple can live together there. Two-story apartment building, second floor. You do not have to pay extra payment and even in the case I cannot hire your husband, you can live together there with month-rent 48,000 yen. And your husband can work for another English school in Hamamatsu or in this area.

His info:
TCES Ltd. Mr. Naoki Muramatsu
2cho-me-29-10 Kamijima, Hamamatsu-city, Shizuoka-prefecture.
Tell 053-476-2755
Fax 053-476-2758

Thanks a ton! Any helpful input is appreciated!
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Sherri



Joined: 23 Jan 2003
Posts: 748
Location: The Big Island, Hawaii

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A quick comment about emailing the teachers. I think the school manager just wanted to check with his employees if they minded if he gave out their email addresses--after all this should be private. Would you like for your school manager to give out personal information about you without your permission? At the school I work for we never disclose this kind of information without getting the teacher's consent first. If this is the case, I think it is a good sign not a bad one.
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 7:51 am    Post subject: i hope so! Reply with quote

I am really hoping that it is something like that, as i really want to work at this school and that would be quite reasonable. thanks for the input.. i hope you're right! Smile
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lajzar



Joined: 09 Feb 2003
Posts: 647
Location: Saitama-ken, Japan

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That contract looks pretty standard, though a little on the bare side. I can see lots of situations where nothing is written and a loophole could be found, but I think you said this is just an edited version. There is nothing actually *bad* written in there.

I live in Hamamatsu. The contract doesn't say the size of that place, but assuming it is a 2DK apartment, it is very good value. Even for 1DK, it is good. However, given that you are being railroaded into his choice of apartment and he already owns the apartment, I think it is reasonable to ask for a few photos of the place, just to give you peace of mind about the condition of the building. After all, you wouldn't rent a place back home without seeing the place would you?
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David W



Joined: 17 Jan 2003
Posts: 457
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2003 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a pretty standard contract. Christmas/New Year holidays are good, rent is reasonable, he'll let your husband stay there, there is nothing that puts up a red flag for me. Remember, even if you take the job and it turns out to be less than you expected you'll still have the visa and will be able to find a better job. If he's hiring you from abroad that's about the best you could expect deal wise. I'd go for it contigent on a reasonable bill of health from the present teachers. Good luck, let us know what happens.
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 4:43 am    Post subject: heard back from prior teacher at TCES Reply with quote

I tracked down a teacher who worked at TCES a couple of years ago and he said that he had a great time teaching, the school was legit and the only downsides were the unpredictability of having schedules changed and students added randomly, but it sounded a lot better than the stories I’ve heard from other places. The only other potentially negative thing he said was that the owner was high strung and a little paranoid, but I have certainly dealt with employers with worse faults, and after five months in China at a school that is liberal with contract changes and interpretation, I’m sure working on a tighter ship will come as a relief. So I wrote the owner back and said that I am officially interested. I’ll let you know how it works out, and thanks for your help!
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PAULH



Joined: 28 Jan 2003
Posts: 4672
Location: Western Japan

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Katchoo

just saw your post and was wondering if you checked a couple of things

1. Does the 25 hours a week cited mean actual teaching hours required or the actual hours you are in the office?
Many schools cite 25 hours so they can put you down as part time when it comes to paying health insurance. You may be in fact working an 8-hour day or 40 hours a week but he only counts your teaching hours to avoid paying out on premiums. Other than that its a standard vanilla contract.

2. By the sounds of it he doesnt include health insurance which should be compulsory for full time employees.

May pay to check but the rest sounds like its above board.

JMTCW
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:06 am    Post subject: actual contract Reply with quote

here's the contract he just sent me. I am going to spruce it up to make it look more official and have places to sign, etc... but how do the terms sound? He explains the insurance concern, i think, but let me know what you think he expects. i will ask him directly once i compile a bunch of questions.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Employment Contract

I (T.C.E.S. Ltd., Naoki Muramatsu) hereby swear to hire Ms. Elizabeth Stephens-Doll who is from (Address) San Diego, California, The U.S.A., in TCES Ltd. where is at 2 cho-me 29-10 ,Kamijima, Hamamatsu-city in Shizuoka-prefecture ,Japan as a Full Time English Teacher from August 4th, 2003. to August 3rd 2004.

*25 hours a week (Tuesday to Saturday)
*100 hours a month
*2,500 yen per hour
Monthly Payment 250,000 yen guaranteed.
*1 year contract (from August 4th, 2003 to August 3rd, 2004)
*Sundays and Mondays are entirely off.
*2003-2004 Paid Vacation: three times a year
: Summer Break (from August 10th 2003 to August 18th 2003)
: New Years Holiday (from December 21th, 2003 to January 5th, 2004)
: Golden Week (from April 29th, 2004 to May 5th, 2004)
*The full time teacher is insured Medical Insurance for one year.
*Travel expenses as to the classes being held outside Kamijima-Office such as company classes or common house classes are paid with monthly payment at the beginning of each month.
*Monthly payments are paid at the beginning of each month after the account closing at the end of each month.
*Resignation

With coherent reason, T.C.E.S.Ltd. accepts it with more than two months prior Notification from a Full time teacher (It has to be submitted to TCES Ltd.., Naoki Muramatsu in the written paper).

And if some disagreements between TCES Ltd. and Full time teacher happen, both sides sincerely and honestly negotiate and settle it.


The owner Naoki Muramatsu .
29-10,2cho-me,Kamijima,Hamamatsu-city,Shizuoka-prefecture.
Tell:053-476-2755 TCES Ltd.
Fax:053-476-2758
March 4th, 2003.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Some questions:

Is 60 days standard for resignation? What happens if I don’t let him know within 60 days? The contract doesn't say... can I get in legal trouble, or is he sort of SOL if he doesn't explicitly say in the contract? (aka. should I bring it up)

Also, he asked if I was willing to teach kindergarten, but it seems to me that a class of kids that young would need a lot of manipulatives, toys, etc that I cannot afford to supply. Is the school expected to supply those?

And on a teaching note... how do I teach English vocabulary for concepts they do not yet have in their native language (counting, abc's, etc) or do I really just play with them to get the sounds and form of English in their minds at an early age? Has someone taught Kindergarten in Japan who would advise me on their expectations? My mother teaches first grade ESL, but she is the children’s only teacher, so she is responsible to get them up to grade level knowledge. Will these classes be ‘extra-curricular’ for the students or will I need to deliver content outside of chatting, singing and playing in English? Help! Wink

Thanks again!


Last edited by katchoo on Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

geez... i posted this too fast and missed that there is no mention of the rental agreement (that he pays key money/deposit, etc and i pay rent) and a few other things. i am going to write up a contract and then link to it here in a bit. hopefully that will cover ome issues. thanks!
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PAULH



Joined: 28 Jan 2003
Posts: 4672
Location: Western Japan

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Katchoo


"Is 60 days standard for resignation? What happens if I don’t let him know within 60 days? The contract doesn't say... can I get in legal trouble, or is he sort of SOL if he doesn't explicitly say in the contract? (aka. should I bring it up)"

2 months is pretty well standard but that said its not enforceable. By that I mean many teachers may give notice after a month and be OK He can not penalise you if you give 1 months notice, withhold salary or fine you etc if you do not give sufficient notice. 1 month is about the average and a common courtesy. so he can find another teacher esp. if you are in a rural area. Students usually book one month in advance so you dont want to inconvenience your students either.

If you have a valid work visa the visa is yours, you can work legally in Japan and he can not take it away, he can not threaten to sue or fire you. If he does call his bluff and contact a teachers union. They will read him his rights.




"Also, he asked if I was willing to teach kindergarten, but it seems to me that a class of kids that young would need a lot of manipulatives, toys, etc that I cannot afford to supply. Is the school expected to supply those? "

I have never taught kids but FWIW I have a 4 year old I am teaching English at home. i am also doing research on elementary education and the teaching of english to kids. If you have email I will send some good articles your way.

Kids of that are like sponges so teaching them grammar etc like adults doesnt work. Plenty of repetition, games, songs, Flash cards. Toys should be supplied by the school IMO but I think detract from the lesson. Just speaking English, lots of activity dancing and singing, lots of imput. If you play the gutar you can sing songs etc. there is a good book called Jazz Chants by Carolyn Graham which you can use with kids as well.


You dont need toys IMO etc but you will teach them the names of objects, numbers, seasons, colors etc. You should not have to buy toys etc and anyway. At that age they are interested in the sound of English,their attention span is less than 5 minutes so you need plenty of variety and interesting activities. props are not mandatory.




And on a teaching note... how do I teach English vocabulary for concepts they do not yet have in their native language (counting, abc's, etc) or do I really just play with them to get the sounds and form of English in their minds at an early age?


Teaching 3-4 year olds to read English is a waste of time IMO- They wont know the grammar or vocabulary or syntax etc better to get the sounds down- you can teach them the phonetics or match the sound with the letter etc but teaching words etc may be beyond them. My four year old can not read yet but they enjoy being read too and looking at the pictures. lots of picture books (they like the ones with flaps, lots of animals etc). Lots of repetition, dont worry whether you think they get it or not- it all goes in the minds black box)



"Has someone taught Kindergarten in Japan who would advise me on their expectations? My mother teaches first grade ESL, but she is the children’s only teacher, so she is responsible to get them up to grade level knowledge. Will these classes be ‘extra-curricular’ for the students or will I need to deliver content outside of chatting, singing and playing in English? Help! "

I would suggest you take a look at http://www.genkienglish.com which is a website for teaching kids in japan. Lots of great activities for kids and some teachers with advice for you.

Will look for those articles for you.
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a ton, Paul! When I said toys i really meant things like flashcards, an interactive wall calander, things to put up on the walls so that they always have something to refer to, the giant picture books, lots of pictures in general, and various other visual props. do you think those will be supplied or will i be expected to get them ahead of time? i can prolly get my mom to gather up some of her old ones, and is there even a place to buy them in Japan?

Thanks for all your other info. Very helpful!
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PAULH



Joined: 28 Jan 2003
Posts: 4672
Location: Western Japan

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:40 am    Post subject: Teaching Kids in Japan Reply with quote

Do you teach children? If you do, you undoubtedly have an opinion or two about the ways children learn language best. Those opinions will form the basis of your own personal philosophy of teaching English as a foreign langauge (TEFL) for children. So, before going any further, put on your thinking cap and fill in the following opinion survey with numbers from 1 (best) to 10 (worst).


Young children learn EFL by
__ doing the things they like to do
__ following a carefully designed syllabus
__ hearing a model and repeating
__ listening and acting
__ playing and doing things in the language
__ practicing correct language patterns
__ singing and chanting
__ starting early
__ talking about what's important to them
__ trying to say things and making mistakes


If you are like me, you probably easily marked the three or four "best" ways, and another two or three "worst" ways, while the others fell into a "well, sometimes" range in the middle. But it is very likely that your ranking is different from mine, and at least a little different from the teacher in the next classroom. Of course, it depends on whether your own class is very young children of ages three or four, or those "almost adults" of ages 13 or 14. Yet, even if we are talking about children of the same age, competent teachers will still have different opinions about the best method to use. Why is this?

We all are different
Teachers of EFL to children in Japan come to the profession from many different walks of life. Some were teachers of adults who started to teach kids. Others are children's teachers who have added EFL to what they teach. Still others are parents who want their own children to learn English, so have decided to start classes for kids. And then there are those with no EFL training at all, who are here in Japan for other reasons, but have been asked to teach a class or two of children in the neighborhood.
Each teacher has different ideas about how to teach EFL to children. These ideas come from many different sources. One of the strongest influences on teaching style is how the teacher herself learned EFL or another foreign language. Those who learned a foreign language through a grammar/translation method tend to use it; while those who learned with lots of drills, in an audio-lingual environment, are more likely to believe that is the best way. If we have had any training in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), TEFL or elementary education, it also influences the methods we use. If we have children of our own, we might observe how they learn and adapt that to our EFL teaching. Finally, the text we are using and its teacher's manual are often strong influences on what we do in the classroom. Each teacher has a different background and different language learning experiences, and these translate into different ideas about methods. The important question is, however, how can we best translate our ideas about the best ways children learn into concrete lesson plans and activities?

Adapt the activities
Look at your answers to the opinion survey again. Now, think about the last class of children you taught. Compare what you did in class with your opinions about the ways children learn best. How do they mesh? Did all or most of the activities in the class fit with your ideas? If they didn't, how can you change the lesson plan, or adapt the activities, so they do fit in with your developing philosophy? Let's look at a couple of common classroom games and see how they can be changed.
BINGO
This is a game many of us have played at parties. Do you play it in class also? In its original form, it fits three of my own ideas about how children learn best: by doing things they like to do, by playing in the language, and by listening and acting. Yet we can easily adapt the game to fit other philosophies. Here are a few suggestions:
Children learn best by hearing and repeating: Use a picture Bingo game to introduce new vocabulary or structures. After the teacher calls the name of the picture or says the target structure, using the picture, children repeat it before covering it on their cards.

Children learn best by practicing patterns: Use picture Bingo to practice the patterns. Have children in turn say the target structure that fits any picture, and all then cover it.

Children learn best by singing and chanting: Each Bingo square represents a line from a song or chant the children have learned, in words or in pictures. Kids either repeat after the teacher or call out the lines themselves.

Children learn best by talking about what's important to them: Have children make original statements that are true about pictures. Try it with pets, foods, or activities, and structures such as "I like/don't like...," or "I want/don't want..., because..."

MEMORY or CONCENtrATION
This is another classroom favorite for all levels of learners. In its original form, children search for two matching cards from a set that are placed face down on the table. It's something children like to do and it can involve playing in English, if we set it up carefully. Adaptations for other philosophies include:
Children learn best by hearing and repeating: Each pair or small group of children has a single set of cards placed face down on the table. The teacher uses another set to call out the names of cards. Children repeat after the teacher before trying to find the matching card.

Children learn best by practicing patterns: Each card has something else, representing a way to use the target structure, on its reverse side. These are all unique -- each card has a different picture or word. On his turn, a child may not touch the card himself, but instead says the pattern two times, using the two cards he wants. Another student turns over the cards.

Children learn best by singing and chanting: Children say a simple chant before turning over the second card, such as "Where is it? Where is it? Where's the pencil?" or "I want it! I want it! I want the ruler!"

Other parts of a philosophy
Of course, methodology forms only one part of a philosophy of EFL for children. We need to consider children's motivation and also goals: of the children, their parents, and the teacher. These are beyond the scope of this short article, but will be discussed in the JALT 97 workshop. In the meantime, try another short opinion survey about children's motivation:

Children come to EFL classes because
__ it will be useful in junior and senior high school
__ learning a new language is fun
__ their parents want them to
__ they like the teacher
__ they like their friends in the class
__ they want to talk to foreigners


How can we adapt our lesson plans and activities to fit this part of our philosophy, too? In the workshop, we will examine and evaluate various parts of philosophies, as well as activities and techniques, with the goal of developing a philosophy and adapting our lesson plans to suit it.

We can all benefit from examining our own beliefs about teaching children and developing a personal philosophy. With such a philosophy, we can better evaluate the activities we encounter in teacher's manuals and magazines, or see at presentations. Rather than indiscriminately using the most recent game we have come across, we can adapt the game, making changes that will improve it for us and for our students. And that's what effective teaching is all about.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aleda Krause's workshop is sponsored by Prentice Hall Japan. She is co-author of the children's series SuperKids and coordinator of the JALT Teaching Children N-SIG.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

All articles at this site are copyright © 1997 by their respective authors.
Document URL: http://www.jalt-publications.org/tlt/files/97/sep/krause.html
Last modified: September 15, 1997
Site maintained by TLT Online Editor
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katchoo



Joined: 28 Feb 2003
Posts: 17

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Exactly what documents do i need to work legally in Japan?
My impression is that I need a "Certificate of Eligibility" before i land. I assume the school will send me this, correct?
Do i need a work permit separetly? or an alien residence card? anything else?

I am writing up the contract and i want to explicitly state what documents are required.
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PAULH



Joined: 28 Jan 2003
Posts: 4672
Location: Western Japan

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 8:06 am    Post subject: More Kids stuff for first graders Reply with quote

LESSON SUBJECT/ACTIVITY PHRASE

1INTRO > Sing ABC's ** Hello / Hello
> Count to 10 ** Good Morning / Afternoon
> actions: stand up, sit down, jump, spin, stop ** Goodbye
> Sing 'Hello' song / Craft (use their names)
2COLORS > actions: cheer, sleep, dance, shake hands ** Hello, My name is______ / My name is______
> colors: see 1-nen sei topics Nice to meet you (handshake)
> Find the color / Color basket > What's this?
3FRUIT > commands: play…. (ie..baseball, tennis) ** Hello, What's your name? / My name is_______. /
> fruit: apple, banana, cherry, grapes, orange, strawberry Nice to meet you / Nice to meet you too.
> Karuta or Fruit Basket (handshake)
> What's this?
4ANIMALS > actions: play…. , watch TV, go away, come here ** Thank you / You're welcome
> animals: bird, cat, dog, frog, lion, mouse, pig, rabbit > What's this?
> Good pet / Bad pet
> Group Karuta or Animal Basket
5NUMBERS > review: actions, colors, fruit, animals, ** Hello, What's your name? / My name is_______. /
> numbers: #1-12 Nice to meet you / Nice to meet you too.
> Group Karuta > How old are you? (handshake)
>> (age)
6WEATHER > review: actions ** How are you? / I'm (fine / good)
> weather: see 1-nen sei topics > What's the weather like?
> Pass the telephone game >> It's (weather)
7HALLOWEENculture > Halloween: ghost, witch, devil, pumpkin >> Happy Halloween
> Show pictures and Tell story
> Make pumpkin faces.
8BODY PARTS > review: actions ** How are you? / I'm (fine / good / OK)
> body parts: see 1-nen sei topics
> Draw picture game
> Sing Head & Shoulders / Simon says
9CHRISTMASculture > Christmas: Santa Claus, snowman, stocking, >> Merry Christmas
x-mas tree, present
> Show pictures, Tell story
> Make stockings
10REVIEW > review: actions, numbers (1-12), body parts ** Hello, What's your name? / My name is_______. /
> Various Games and Activities Nice to meet you / Nice to meet you too.
(handshake)
11ABCs > Sing ABC's ** How are you? / I'm (fine / good / OK)
> alphabet: A-apple, ant; B-boy, banana, bird > What's this?
> Introduce Alphabet Books
> Do A and B in Alphabet book and color book.
12ABCs > Sing ABC's ** Thank you / You're welcome
> alphabet: C-cat; D-dog; E-eel, elephant, egg; > What's this?
F-frog, fish, flower > What do you like?
> Group Karuta >> I like _______.
13REVIEWculture > review: phrases, alphabet vocabulary REVIEW ** phrases
> Tell story
> Play cultural game
NOTES: If +13 lessons, then:
-Cultural games
-Cultural crafts
-World talks
-English review
After lesson 6, ask 'What's the weather like?' at the beginning of each lesson. ** Conversation phrase
>> Lesson Speaking phrases
> Lesson Listening phrases


1-nensei

-TOPICS

-Actions: stand up, sit down, jump, stop, spin, cheer, sleep, dance, shake hands,
play…..(ie. baseball, tennis), watch TV, go away, come here.

-Colors(Cool: green, blue, purple, red, yellow, orange, white, black

-Fruit/Food(Cool: apple, banana, cherry, egg, grapes, orange, strawberry, cherry

-Animals(13): ant, bird, cat, dog, fish, frog, lion, monkey, mouse, pig, rabbit, eel
elephant

-Numbers: #1-12

-Weather(5): sunny, cloudy, windy, rainy, snowy

-Body Parts(Cool: hand, foot, head, eye, ear, nose, mouth, tummy

-Alphabet Pronunciation & Alphabet Vocabulary (see page 3): A-F

-Emotions(3): fine, good, OK



-CULTURE:

- Holidays: Halloween, Christmas, (others…)
- Cultural Games & Crafts
- World Talks: Time differences, Season differences, Distances


-PHRASES (Speaking & Listening):

-Hello
-Goodbye
-Good Morning
-Good Afternoon

-Hello, What's your name?
My name is _______.
My name is _______.
Nice to meet you. (handshake)
Nice to meet you too.

-What's this?

-Thank you.
You're Welcome

-How old are you?
(age)

-How are you?
I'm (fine / good / OK) .

-What's the weather like?
It's (weather)

-What do you like?
I like _______.









Copyright 1999/2001 Joel Bacha

Questions? Comments? Email Joel at joel@genkienglish.net or write them on our discussion board!

Also Check out Joel's Ideas Page
Year 1 , 2, 3, 4, 5

 See also Richard's Genki English Year Plan
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PAULH



Joined: 28 Jan 2003
Posts: 4672
Location: Western Japan

PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2003 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For info on visas see the MOFA page

http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/

That explains what you need to do. Your employer will know what immigration needs and you have to make sure you supply what he asks for. If in doubt contact the Japanese consulate or embassy.

Once the embassy sends you back your passport with your visa satmped in it you are ready to leave for Japan

Every foreigner who lives in Japan more than 90 days with a valid visa (except tourist) must have a Gaijin Torokusho (Alien registration) card. Without it you can not open a bank account and you can be stopped by police if you dont have one. Those on tourist visas dont need one.


You can get this card at the vity office anytime within the 90 days after you arrive.
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