Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Tips for teaching Kuwaiti 12th grade boys poetry
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Kuwait
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
passionateteacher



Joined: 23 Dec 2009
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 7:05 am    Post subject: Tips for teaching Kuwaiti 12th grade boys poetry Reply with quote

How is everyone?

I wanted to know if there were any suggestions that anyone had for teaching Kuwaiti boys poetry. The school that I am currently teaching uses the American Cirriculum. The 12th grade consists of boring analyzing of poetry from the 16-18th century. Most of it is European literature. The boys seem to understand the work without a problem but get distracted easily and start to talk while the teacher is talking. I have taught a class and arrived here in the middle of the school year. They seem to do this with all of their teachers. I observed a class yesterday and the boys behaved very badly with their regular teacher. What advice can anyone offer. I have gone online to research tips on making the teaching approach more engaging and interesting, but it is difficult to hold their attention. What should I do?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Starfell



Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leave.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
passionateteacher



Joined: 23 Dec 2009
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:44 pm    Post subject: Not a Quitter Reply with quote

How are you Starfell?

First of all, I am not a quitter. I was told that the boys were very good in the beginning of the semester, until they went on a 10 day excursion. Then they came back very animated. They are very smart and digest the material well. I think that they just get bored easily with the context. After all European/American literature is not the most exciting thing in the world.
If I had that attitude to just leave, then I would not be a teacher. There is always something about your job that you will not like. However when one is able to overcome these challenges and your students learn it makes you feel good inside. It also improves your performance as a teacher.
I am looking for more positive open-ended suggestions please.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Starfell



Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All kids ''are good at the start of the semester''. Don't be mislead, no field trip turned your gang into monsters- its poor leadership and lack of discipline from the top.....

Try using songs with them. I once used Dire Straits 'Romeo and Juliet'' as a lead in to the famous scene, and had them re write it in their own words.

European poetry is not boring...................btw.

''Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash.''
L. Cohen
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
15yearsinQ8



Joined: 17 Oct 2006
Posts: 462
Location: kuwait

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I knew a Math teacher at ATIS HS (he's Palestinian AMerican and in Hawaii now) who gave out all A's and B's for Alegeba II and Pre Calculus covering only 4 chapters in a 24 chapter book for the year.
He did a few problems on the board, made the students copy them, then let the class do what they like for the other 30 minutes of the class.

No kidding.

Absolutely no joke. Google him or ask the ATIS survivors, his sir name is shared by a Hezb leader in Lebanon.

They paid him really well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
15yearsinQ8



Joined: 17 Oct 2006
Posts: 462
Location: kuwait

PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain, Oh my Captain.....
Don't expect a 'Dead Poets Society' moment.....

come to think of it , ripping pages from their books.....THAT would get their attention


anyway, leave ATIS now - don't ever put it on your resume should you want another job in Kuwait
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
passionateteacher



Joined: 23 Dec 2009
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To Starfell:

This is a wonderful idea, but at my school music as part of the cirriculum is not allowed. Ok all European poetry is not boring, but most of it is. If it is not boring then some of it is downright SICK. Have you ever tried to teach international students the inner meaning behind "A Rose for Emily". I had to in the US and it was not a pretty explanation!

15yearsinQ8: Are you sure you have been in Kuwait 15 years? I was hoping for a very in depth response from you! Your response had absolutely nothing to do with my original question! You went off a deep tangent from the original scope of the focus of the conversation.

I hope I can get some positive feedback from this post. I like your idea Starfell but unfortunately I am not allowed to use music. Do you have any other suggestions!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
15yearsinQ8



Joined: 17 Oct 2006
Posts: 462
Location: kuwait

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sigh, didn't see the movie did you?
with the magic of you tube , you can now
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWdEmrTUsqc&feature=PlayList&p=88A2B3DB00881950&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=26

a search of youtube and a rose shows numerous hits
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLPKwnpoQK4


my first post belonged on the camel thread....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12903
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear passionateteacher,

"Ok all European poetry is not boring, but most of it is. If it is not boring then some of it is downright SICK. Have you ever tried to teach international students the inner meaning behind "A Rose for Emily"."

Hmm, Faulkner was a European and "A Rose for Emily" is a poem? Actually, Emily was what you might call "passionate."

Regards,
John
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
veiledsentiments



Joined: 20 Feb 2003
Posts: 16183
Location: USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do believe that Ms passionate teacher asked for suggestions of poems for 12th year Kuwaiti boys...

She was using "A Rose for Emily" as an example of a poem that DIDN'T work while in the US...

Sorry I can't help you... I never even attempted it other than the use of some song lyrics. This was accidental as they had asked me to help them write down the words. I let them choose the songs... within limits, of course. It could be done without playing the actual music in class.

VS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Starfell



Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So you are in Al Ruya, I return to my first comment. Leave, and go somewhere where they don't think music whips up the devil in ya......there are plenty of ''normal'' schools out there.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12903
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear veiledsentiments,

"A Rose for Emily" isn't a poem; it's a short story by William Faulkner.

http://www.moonstar.com/~acpjr/Blackboard/Common/Stories/RoseEmily.html


How about a ballad, a heroic one, such as Sohrab and Rostam:

Rostam is Iranís greatest mythological hero, a Persian Hercules, magnificent in strength and courage. As re-counted in the tenth-century Book of Kings (Shahnameh) by the poet Ferdowsi, he was an indomitable force in ancient Persia for five hundred years, undergoing many trials of combat, cunning, and endurance. Although Rostam served a series of often-fickle kings, he was always his own man, committed to the greater good of Iran. His adventures are some of the best loved of all Persian narratives and remain deeply resonant in Iranian culture.
Rostam: Tales of Love & War from Persiaís Book of Kings begins with the birth of Rostamís father Zal and ends with Rostamís death. The tales tell of the love between Zal and Rostamís mother, the Kaboli princess Rudabeh; of Rostamís miraculous birth, aided by the magical bird Simorgh; of Rostamís youth and the selection of his trusty horse Rakhsh; of his affair with Princess Tahmineh, the birth of their son Sohrab, and, after Sohrab grows into a mighty warrior himself, the tragic confrontation between father and son. The tales conclude with Rostamís war against demons, his seven trials, his rescue of Prince Bizhan, and finally his battle, both intellectual and physical, with the ambitious and religiously driven prince Esfandyar."

Regards,
John
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Starfell



Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got it.
Beatles lyrics - ''She's leaving home'' , is perfect, oh and casually mention as they leave class ''this is a song, you tube available''

-oh and also, it's european 'poetry'.

''Wednesday morning at five o'clock as the day begins
Silently closing their bedroom door
Leaving the note that she hoped would say more
She goes downstairs to the kitchen clutching her handkerchief
Quietly turning the backdoor key
Stepping outside she is free.''


Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12903
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear Starfell,

But would they be able to relate?

"Stepping outside she is free.''

Regards,
John
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Starfell



Joined: 24 Mar 2010
Posts: 138

PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps if they were a teacher, with approx 55 days to go before freedom, they might.

Now, how do I make Shakespeare interesting to the same age group??
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Kuwait All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC