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Job Without a Degree

 
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tstimbert



Joined: 14 Apr 2010
Posts: 1
Location: Nebraska, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:26 am    Post subject: Job Without a Degree Reply with quote

I plan on getting CERTA or TESOL certified this year in Santiago, Chile. I want to start working immediately. If necessary, for a short amount of time, I can make ends meet in another field, as long as I'm albe communicate mostly in English.

I suppose I'm asking for direction as to which certification programs, institutes, and/or jobs would be the best when the cards are stacked against me:
* No university degree
* Only 18 years old
* Santiago is a must
* Less-than fluent in Spanish (especially spoken)

But
* Native speaker from North America
* Very good test (standardized and ACT) scores in English and Reading
* Large vocabulary
* Vast knowledge of both formal and slang English


I understand that a degree is very helpful in finding an overseas career, but I would like to support myself in Santiago as soon as possible.
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CountBassD



Joined: 08 Feb 2010
Posts: 33
Location: Bogota, Colombia

PostPosted: Sat Apr 24, 2010 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the research I've done and people I've talked to about Chile, a university degree is more important there than anywhere else in the continent. Santiago is also one of the tougher job markets in South America. There are very qualified teachers struggling to find jobs in Santiago.

Also, I'm not sure what a CERTA is, but if you mean CELTA, it isn't offered in Santiago, only Ecuador, Colombia and Buenos Aires as far as South America goes. Also, you have to be 20.

I wish you luck, but I would recommend looking at other South American cities, especially in Peru.
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Dia



Joined: 09 Apr 2008
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2010 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

purely anecdotal evidence, but i have usually beeb asked for my university degree at the places that considered hiring me, not to mention its on my resume but they were serious enough about that aspect to want a copy. i have not met anybody teaching here who does not have a degree. i do know of someone who found a job using mostly english who started but did not complete her degree.

so not to say that its not possible, but it wouldnt be the most common situation.

it is very unlikely that anybody here would ask for, or even know what to do with, your ACT scores.

you mentioned the possibility of other types of work, and unfortunately getting some average job like one might in the US (e.g. coffee shop, etc) probably wouldnt be sufficient or sustainable for most foreigners here. however there is always the possibility you would find some company that really needs someone with a good level of english for a position that doesn't require a degree. something in tourism comes to mind, being a guide, shifts at a hostal, etc...

i dont think it would be an impossible situation, but the job search might be kind of a drawn out process. hopefully you could come with a little money in the bank for the meantime or to cover any shortfalls.

good luck!
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geolady29



Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Birmingham, AL

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:36 am    Post subject: What type of degree? Reply with quote

This is probably a horrible newbie question, but when people in the Chile forum are discussing college degrees, do they always mean a teaching degree? For instance, I have a B.A. & M.S. in geology, my husband has B.S. in physics and M.L.I.S. (Masters of library & information science).

Would our degrees, in conjunction with a CELTA, be sufficient to get a job teaching in Chile? Or would we need to get teaching degrees? Or simply get the CELTA and get teaching experience elsewhere first?

Any guidance would be appreciated, as we intend to take a year off from our careers and teach English overseas. We still have some time before we're ready to go to address any deficiencies, so long as we can identify them Smile

Thanks!
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geolady29



Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Birmingham, AL

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:39 am    Post subject: P.S. - previous post Reply with quote

I should mention maybe that we're older (35+), and both of us have 15+ years of experience in our chosen careers. Would that help make up for some of the negatives associated with not having classroom teaching experience? At this stage in our careers, we have both trained and/or mentored many people...
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Don Alan



Joined: 11 Dec 2004
Posts: 150
Location: Glasgow, Scotland

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get the CELTA and you will be fine.
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Cruiser



Joined: 26 Nov 2010
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don Alan wrote:
Get the CELTA and you will be fine.


Yeah, I guess. Only -- well, then you're just one more happy gringo with a CELTA. Ho hum. It helps to have some out of the box training, something specialised. Tutoring for example requires a very select set of skills, and actually pays better than teaching classes. Most schools get tutoring requests so if you have some credentials there you'll make more money.

Not to mention the potential revenue from private classes.

My point is, shop around. Don't take the same option as everyone else. Be different.
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geolady29



Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Birmingham, AL

PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 6:06 pm    Post subject: re: be different Reply with quote

what, old geologists and librarians aren't different from all the other people doing TESL? lol

My husband works at a public library with a growing Hispanic and Asian population, so I think both private tutoring and/or teaching classes at the library are options.

If my husband were the geologist, we could live in the Middle East and clean up teaching oilfield English. Unfortunately, I am the geologist, and don't have much interest in living in a country where I'm a second class citizen at best.

Speaking of, I've seen posts about people teaching at the uni level, has anyone heard of TESL for specific things except business? For example, teaching English for geology, physics, or mathematics?

Thanks to each of you for the reply, and I will keep in the mind the need for additional and/or specialty experience to give us a firmer footing.
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Dia



Joined: 09 Apr 2008
Posts: 92

PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 3:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the majority of foreigners teaching English seem to have have degrees in something apart from education, and the TEFL or similar is the only official training they have had as far as how to teach. I have never heard of a course geared towards a particular field other than

You would probably be very much appreciated by companies if you were to teach English to people in your field. This also goes for private tutoring, and possibly university courses (while often times the universities employ English teachers with teaching degrees, there would be some advantage to having an English teacher who is a professional in that field.) This would basically depend on you finding your way to the right person at a university where the English teaching isnt outsourced to a private company.

I worked at an institute with a man who was in a similar situation as you, the companies he was sent to really respected the chance to study with someone like him, another adult with professional experience in the field (as opposed to the typical young and right out of university teacher). However since he was working through an institute this didn't have any advantage in terms of pay, whereas independently he would have been able to charge more for his services (or charge the same but keep it for himself).

Good luck!
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Cruiser



Joined: 26 Nov 2010
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dia wrote:


Good luck!


Yeah. The thing is, 'get a CELTA' is pretty generic advice for any footloose U. student planning to wander S. America. You're hardly in that category. Once you go that route you'll just get snapped up by I.H. who will shortly be offering your specialized knowledge and skills to their own corporate clients for peanuts. Your teaching credentials run a distant second to your experience and training in the field, and that's what I'd be putting forward. Not the fact that I have the same teaching credential as literally thousands of 20 somethings wandering the land with backpacks. There's a lot of mineral extraction going on in S. America, so why call yourself a teacher at all? Call yourself a consulting geologist specializing in communications. S America is a busy place for miners these days...
.
.
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geolady29



Joined: 13 Jul 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Birmingham, AL

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 1:47 am    Post subject: mining geology Reply with quote

Cruiser,

Thank you for the ideas... I don't have any minerals extraction experience, but I have years of oilfield and environmental. I expect there is a good bit of oil exploration going on as well.

I will start digging deeper re: private teaching, rather than going through an institute. Sounds interesting, plus to be honest, I would much rather stay in geology (or construction management, which I'm doing now) than teach basic English.

Maybe my husband can pursue the same type idea for his physics and/or mathematics background.

Thank you everyone else as well, you have given me much to ponder.
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