Site Search:
 
Get TEFL Certified & Start Your Adventure Today!
Teach English Abroad and Get Paid to see the World!
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

A non-native English speaker to teach English
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Newbie Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ronett



Joined: 18 Jul 2010
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:10 pm    Post subject: A non-native English speaker to teach English Reply with quote

Hia,

I am completely new to this amazing ESL cafe so forgive me if my question has been answered before (and I missed it).

I was wondering about the chances of pursing a carreer as an EFL teacher within Europe and perhaps also Asia.

I am a non-native English speaker (from the CZ) who has been living in the UK for almost 10 years. I have a degree from a UK uni, which covered anything from language learning & teaching to psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and various analyses (grammar, written/spoken discourse, etc.). Have been working in finance for the last 3 years and have decided to chase my dream- teaching English whilst travelling and learning other languages. I am currently working towards obtaining a CELTA certificate.

I am fairly self critical and if I knew my English was not good enough for this (accent, bad grammar, etc.), I would certainly not try to pursue this career. I know they say the 'gap' between the non-natives and natives never closes in terms of English language knowledge and usage, but having undergone several certificates (FCE, CAE, Acad IELTS) in my early years myself, I no longer believe nativity of the teacher plays a role here.. But then again perhaps I should get real...

I am just wondering what my chances are amongst the 'natives' as I sense there is a fairly strong competitive vibe in teaching English as a foreign language out there...


I am interested to see what the 'experienced bloggers' have to say.

Thanks ever so much for any opinion you may have

Veronika
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 11061
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Ronett

I'd put your chances head and shoulders above the average native TEFLer just based on your first post here.

You may run up against some issues getting a work visa as an English teacher in some countries on account of your nationality. However, the EU is not closed to you as it would be for most non-EU citizens, so perhaps that more than compensates. In any case, don't in any way feel you you are being unrealistic in pursuing your career in English teaching.

Best of luck to you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11524
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the university where I work, about half of the English department staff are non-native speakers. This work requires post-grad degrees in the field, so I'm not encouraging you to apply to unis yet Surprised , but to illustrate the fact that non-natives are considered valuable additions to a good teaching team.

You may run up against some issues getting a work visa as an English teacher in some countries on account of your nationality

Not in the Euro zone, I don't think. Some Asian countries, perhaps.

Sasha's right - you should be able to get something reasonable at the newbie level. If you don't want to teach in the CR (I'm aware of the rates paid by state schools there Shocked ) I think you could choose a city anywhere in the Euro zone and send CVs. I expect you can find someone who will value your skills both as a teacher and as someone who's successfully learned the language and understands the processes from a first-hand perspective.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiral78 wrote:
You may run up against some issues getting a work visa as an English teacher in some countries on account of your nationality

Not in the Euro zone, I don't think. Some Asian countries, perhaps.
Here in Japan you'll find it hard. Immigration regulations require that non-natives have 12 years of their education all in English.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ronett



Joined: 18 Jul 2010
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi again all,

Many thanks for your most valuable responses!

Quote:
Here in Japan you'll find it hard. Immigration regulations require that non-natives have 12 years of their education all in English.


I have heard there are quite severe reatrictions in some Asian countries, so I am glad to know wanting to teach in Japan would be like chasing a ghost at this stage. Would anyone know if similar limitations apply in S/N Korea, China, Vietnam?

Quote:
If you don't want to teach in the CR (I'm aware of the rates paid by state schools there.


Good point re teaching in the CR and can see where you are coming from on this one.
The truth is, I am trying to avoid teaching in the CR as much as possible. I know any teaching experience is of value at this stage, however returning to work in my homeland would literally feel like walking backwards on all those stepping stones I have been trying to reach here in the UK (not necessarily from the financial point view). However, this does not mean I view the CR as a place with no opportunities... not at all, just not for me.

As for countries within the Eurozone, I am aware the doors are more open to those who hold an EU passport. I am just slightly worried that someone with passion, determination and a strong self-drive (like me) would always be moved on a side track by the disadvantage of being non-native. This, however, will not discourage me from trying.

Best

V.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11524
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am just slightly worried that someone with passion, determination and a strong self-drive (like me) would always be moved on a side track by the disadvantage of being non-native. This, however, will not discourage me from trying.

No - I do not think you will be 'side-tracked.' Being a non-native is often considered an advantage! Keep in mind that the process you've gone through to develop your skills in English gives you an insight into the language that a native speaker cannot have by definition. You can present yourself both as a teacher and as a successful learner yourself.

Again, I can emphasize that good schools in the Euro region DO value non-native teachers in many, many cases.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 11061
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Come to Russia!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DoubleDutch



Joined: 01 Apr 2009
Posts: 51
Location: China

PostPosted: Tue Jul 20, 2010 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ronett wrote:
Quote:
Here in Japan you'll find it hard. Immigration regulations require that non-natives have 12 years of their education all in English.


I have heard there are quite severe reatrictions in some Asian countries, so I am glad to know wanting to teach in Japan would be like chasing a ghost at this stage. Would anyone know if similar limitations apply in S/N Korea, China, Vietnam?

South Korea requires that you have a passport from a native English speaking country. China and Vietnam have no such restrictions. There seem to be a lot of non-native TEFL teachers here in China.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ronett



Joined: 18 Jul 2010
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Thu Jul 22, 2010 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent! Many thanks all.

Once I am 'on the road' I will provide some updates. Perhaps there are more of us 'ambitious non-natives' out there. Very Happy

Best

Veronika
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1838

PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2010 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Consider teaching ESOL in UK further education colleges. It's well paid, although you would need Proficiency level English with CELTA (DELTA too?) on top.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
loveeatsleep



Joined: 28 Jul 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Manila

PostPosted: Thu Jul 29, 2010 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Everyone!

I actually have a similar question but on my part, i'm from South East Asia and planning to obtain a teaching post in EU or Russia but so far most job ads require you to either be their so called "native English" speakers or be an EU Passport holders etc. Yes this fact really makes me sad.

I'm also planning to take the CELTA soon but these things are important to consider because i will be shifting careers (i'm currently an advertising junkie slash social media slave) and it will be a leap of fate. I really want to know the chances and yes even if it hurts.

Thank you all and have a good day!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 11061
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The CELTA course offered at BKC-IH has previously accepted applicants from South East Asia. Not sure how many of them went on to get a job in Russia, but it is not impossible. Most regulations are just on paper here, so you could probably disregard most requirements on Russian adverts.

Not so Euroland. I would not rate your chances at all there, nor for any other non-Euro citizens. Sorry.

In any case, best of luck with your change in career.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 11524
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sasha's right - non EU member citizens have near-nil chances of getting legal work permits for most of the 'old' EU member countries, particularly at the newbie level.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AGoodStory



Joined: 26 Feb 2010
Posts: 738

PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:

Not so Euroland. I would not rate your chances at all there, nor for any other non-Euro citizens. Sorry.


Isn't she an EU citizen? I think she's from the CZ.


Last edited by AGoodStory on Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AGoodStory



Joined: 26 Feb 2010
Posts: 738

PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is from a China thread on the same topic:

Quote:
The problem with this "non native" issue is not so much the universities not wanting to employ you as trying to satisfy the ever more stringent immigration policies.

Any employer, whether within the realms of Arts & Education or not, has to satisfy certain requirements when employing an overseas national. In other words, they have to supply an irrefutable reason that there is a need to bring in a person that is not a Chinese national. The immigration laws state that, if the job can be done by a local Chinese citizen, then a foreigner will not be given a work permit.

With ESL teaching, the trick is to stipulate that the applicant must be a native speaker. By definition, that means from a country where English is L1. As much as they may try, local Chinese cannot ever qualify as a native speaker so the WP requirement is satisfied.

Regardless of how high the English language ability of a non native speaker is, they cannot ever satisfy the WP requirements as there are Chinese nationals that are also bilingual that could be employed. It does not matter if the ability of a non native far exceeds that of any native speakers, they cannot satisfy that legislative requirement.

Of course, this being China, some employers will find ways and means or the guanxi necessary to overcome this requirement. But year on year, the likelihood of non native speakers getting WP's is becoming less and less.


For more: http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=82950
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Newbie Forum All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2018 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Teaching Jobs in China
Teaching Jobs in China