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working in Italy for non-EU citizens

 
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Anna Mila



Joined: 07 Dec 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:55 pm    Post subject: working in Italy for non-EU citizens Reply with quote

I was told that some bigger ESL schools in Rome (e.g. Wall Street Institute etc?) are willing to help the non-EU citizens obtain the work permit. However, most of the job ads that I have seen explicitely state that the work permit or EU citizenship is required. This is very frustrating. Can anyone provide me with some information and insight. I am very well qualified (have a PHD and a lot of eperience in ESL teaching). I am a Canadian citizen.
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Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1216

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2010 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Anna

There's a wealth of info on this forum regarding non-EU work opportunities (you'll have to go back and search through some of the posts).

It is very hard to obtain a work visa - not just for you, but also for the institution that will have to promise you a full-time contract. Most institutions don't want to do this, and can take their pick from the huge number of EU citizens (Brits and Irish) already here, and available for immediate work.

With a PhD, you might have more luck working for one of the universities. Alternatively, sign up at one of these on their foreign language programs (learning Italian) and you can teach for up to 20 hours a week.
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PC Parrot



Joined: 11 Dec 2009
Posts: 394
Location: Moral Police Station

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 3:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is the PhD related to TEFL?
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Anna Mila



Joined: 07 Dec 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 1:46 pm    Post subject: Teaching English in Rome for non EU citizens Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply (Teacher in Rome). I would very much appreciate if you could provide me with more detailed information regarding your suggestion. I supose you meant courses in Italian at the university (Sapienza or any other in Rome?). Does teaching 20 hours a week refer to the university ESL courses, or could I posibly teach at some of the ESL institutes? Is there a time limit to taking Italian courses?

Also, if some schools do indeed help with work permits, I would like to know which ones?

Could you send me a private email?

Thanks,

Anna
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Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1216

PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not all universities have a foreign section - i.e. a section dedicated to running Italian courses for foreigners. There's the University (degli Stranieri) in Perugia, and I think also John Cabot American University in Rome which would fall into this category. As far as I know, not Sapienza or the other Rome universities.

You're not limited to teaching in the university. As long as you have this student visa with part-time work permitted (sorry, don't know the name of this visa) you can work at any institution willing to take you on.

Sorry I don't have the nitty-gritty details, but I'm sure this question has come up before on this forum - maybe have a search through for all the details, then contact the participating universities directly for info on visas.

I thought the student visa was valid for 12 months, but might be wrong on this.
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Anna Mila



Joined: 07 Dec 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 9:48 pm    Post subject: Teaching English in Rome for non EU citizens Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply. I assume that one can also take Italian courses at the language institutes in Rome, or even CELTA or other TEFL training courses offered by the English Language Institutes?

Anna
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9484
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Thu Dec 16, 2010 11:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CELTA and similar courses only last about a month - so this will NOT help you to get a visa. You need a proper university course for at least two semesters of study to qualify for visa assistance.
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Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1216

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you come over on a student visa arranged by one of these universities (allowing you to work part-time) then you can't pick and choose where you study - you have to study at that university. If you're just coming over to learn Italian, then you don't have the right to work, but of course you can study wherever you like.

In answer to your previous question about institutions helping out with work permits.

In my experience, they don't.

It's time-consuming, expensive and risky, when they can take their pick of qualified, experienced native speaking English teachers already on the ground and able to work. Most schools / institutions operate on a needs-must basis: they're very unlikely to hire ahead of time (and it can take a long time to get paperwork through) on the off-chance that they're going to have work for you months down the line. Italy is very last-minute like that.

You might stand more of a chance if you went somewhere lacking in teachers (say small school in a small town) and got on so well with the language school director that they would help you with the visa to not lose you. But even then, it's not that likely.

If you've got really fantastic, sought-after but rare skills, you'll stand a greater chance. For example, if you're a whizz with technology and can put together an elearning course for a company wanting to get started in this area, that might be an interesting angle, and one that made commercial sense to a school.

With a PhD, you might be better off looking for uni type work, but with recent education cuts, you'll also need some good contacts to get you an in.
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Anna Mila



Joined: 07 Dec 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Jan 21, 2011 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The post of December 16 states that I could work par-time, if I took Italian courses (as opposed to the one of December 17). I just wanted to double-check. Thanks.
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Teacher in Rome



Joined: 09 Jul 2003
Posts: 1216

PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anna, this is my understanding of the law:

To get a student visa

You sign up for an accredited Italian course at a university such as the one in Perugia. You pay the uni fees, and attend lessons, etc. (Spiral78 says you need to do this for at least two semesters.)

You are allowed to work part-time (up to 20 hours a week) to help support yourself. You can teach where you like. I once hired an American teacher who was studying at a university in Rome, for example. I'd have given her more hours, but she could only work 20.

To get a work visa

You'll need to persuade an Italian company to take you on - full-time and permanent. (In itself, very very unlikely - most teaching institutions only offer progetto contracts, as they're closed for the summer months and don't want to pay salaries to staff who aren't working.)

Then you go back to Canada, and apply to the italian consulate there for a work visa, providing all the supporting documentation from the Italian employer.

This takes time, money, and commitment to following through with the paperwork. Frankly, something that an Italian language school is highly unlikely to want to do, given the glut of already available, already over here teachers, ready to start tomorrow.
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Anna Mila



Joined: 07 Dec 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for the thorough explanation. it seems that obtaining a student visa is the only realistic option. I just wanted to ask if there are any institutions in Rome that offer acceptable Italian courses (John Cabot American University has a department for Italian Studies?), or any other? I would like to study Italian at the University and hopefully teach part-time at one of the institutes. Thanks in advance.
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