Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Best TEFL Certification Course for working in Rome?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Italy
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
LizaC



Joined: 16 Dec 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:12 pm    Post subject: Best TEFL Certification Course for working in Rome? Reply with quote

Hello,

I am 22 years old, and am a Native-English Speaking American, currently living in the United States. I am at the beginning of my journey to become TEFL certified and move to Rome to teach English.

There are an incredible amount of courses available to take to get certified, and I am very confused in which one to choose. I am hoping that someone can please let me know of some available, and legitimate, courses I can take online to become TEFL certified.

Also, do you think it is necessary to choose a course which offers job assistance, for an additional fee?

Do you know of any good advisors which can provide me with some concrete answers pertaining to Americans wanting to teach and move to Italy?

Thank you so much!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liza, it would be very useful for you to read earlier posts here regarding legal working permits for Americans in Italy.

It's nearly impossible for newbie level American teachers to work legally in most of Western Europe, Italy and Spain included. This is true regardless of the kind of certification you get.

I will go through and bump up some relevant posts for you.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LizaC



Joined: 16 Dec 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your quick response. I greatly appreciate your help.

From the TEFL course "advisors" that I have spoken to already, they have given me the impression that I would be able to go over there under a "tourist visa" and work as a teacher. Is that not correct?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are limited to 90 days in the country on a tourist visa. As of Jan 01, 2009, after 90 days, you have to LEAVE THE ENTIRE SCHENGEN ZONE FOR 90 DAYS.
This means you can only be here for three months out of six months in any given period. No, it doesn't work for teaching, unfortunately.

You could google Schengen zone for a list of countries.

In the past, it was possible to just cross a border every 90 days, get a new stamp, and remain technically legal. This loophole has been closed since Jan 2009.

Your advisors are out of date, I'm afraid.

Penalties for overstaying include deportation and up to a 10 year ban from entering the zone. I don't know anyone who's gotten a 10 year ban, but I do know of several people who have been deported and banned for up to 2 years.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LizaC



Joined: 16 Dec 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow. Ok....

Do you have any advice in how to obtain a work visa? Would it be easier to obtain one when you are already in the country, with a tourist visa?

I have friends that are in France currently, and are teacher assistants. Their job is helping them with obtaining a work visa ...

Basically, I am just looking for a way to make my dream possible. I will do whatever I can in order to be able to have the opportunity to move back overseas. I lived in Barcelona for 4 months when I was in college with a student visa, and fell in love wtih Europe.

If you can just provide me with a little guidance in how to even "attempt" to make this possible, I would appreciate it.

Thank you!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On a more positive note, I'll try to quickly put you in the picture for Europe for Americans in general.

There are some countries where US citizens can still get work permits. These are generally the 'new' EU member countries, such as the Czech Rep, Slovakia, Poland, etc.
The market is normally pretty saturated with teachers here. Jobs are not normally found from abroad, and newbie teachers can expect to incur start up costs in terms of flying to a country and supporting themselves for a couple of months prior to a paycheck.

Regarding certification, online certs will put any newbie at a disadvantage in the entire region. The standard here is CELTA or equivalent - this being a 100+ hour on-site course, including teaching practice with actual students (not peer trainees). There are many such courses offered in the region - Prague in particular is a training centre mecca and many hundreds of newbie teachers start out there in training.

There are some very good reasons to train in-country. Course providers generally handle logistics like airport pickup, accomodation during the course, and local orientation. Your fellow trainees can form your first social contacts, and practice teaching students will really represent those you'll be working with when you start. Training centres can also give you invaluable info regarding reputable local employers.

Schools in Europe generally don't hire from abroad, because there are many teachers here on the ground. Why take a chance on someone sight-unseen, when you have live candidates in your office, ready to teach a demo lesson?

I think if you really want Europe, you'll first need to pinpoint a country or two where you can probably get a legal work permit. Consider a proper training course in country, and time your arrival so that you'll be on the job market when contracts start (usually Sept - June here). You'll need enough financial cushion to get yourself here and through a few months before paychecks begin.

If all this sounds impossible in your situaiton, you may want to consider Asia, where the demand for teachers is so much greater, leading to much stronger perks. Latin America is also an option for legal work.

Good luck!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For Spain, Italy, France, etc. your only real option is a study programme (and it has to be a real one through a local university). Alternatively, find a local to marry very swiftly!

There really are VERY few legal options for this region.

For a school to get you a work permit, they have to argue that you offer something no EU member citizen can offer. I used to work in the Netherlands on such an exceptional visa - but I've actually got specialist qualifications AND I had local contacts there who knew my work.

As a newbie, it's simply very near impossible to find an employer to jump through the considerable and expensive legal hoops. Keep in mind that there are lots of teachers on the market here with good quals and UK passports - no hassle to hire at all!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
LizaC



Joined: 16 Dec 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very Happy I first just want to thank you so much for all your advice. You have no idea how helpful it is to finally get some concrete answers!

I am definitely able to financially afford the option of taking a teaching class in Italy and living without a paycheck for a few months.... I have prepared myself that I would have to pay for my flight, living expenses, etc. Obviously, I would only be taking this option if I was under the impression that after the course, I would be able to find a job.

Also, I think you make a great point. It would be extremely beneficial to use the time in the course for local orientation, and possibly have the option of lodging paid for.

Do you happen to know of any in-country courses (for Rome) that you could recommend?

May I also ask you how you know so much information on this topic? It has been very hard to find ANYONE that can give me some real answers!

Thank you!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cks



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 144

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liza, there are many of us non EU citizens who have been living in Central and Eastern Europe for years hoping that the laws will change and we can someday work legally in Spain, France, or Italy. If it was possible, we would be there already.

As this forum endlessly states, it is not possible for non EU citizens to legally work in the Schengen Zone unless it is one of the countries that entered the EU after 2007 and the jobs are getting pretty limited in our neck of the woods as well. It sounds like the TEFL schools you have been dealing with are taking you for a ride.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Dec 17, 2010 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The chances of your getting legal work in Rome are really basically nil, sadly. Taking a course in the city won't help, for Italy. Really, consider other locations if at all possible!

My story (short version). US citizen, moved to Czech Rep 1998 with BEd, gained CELTA equivalent, worked two years as a teacher and teacher trainer, moved with spouse to Luxembourgh and the Netherlands on spousal visa (spouse works for major international company that arranges work permits for non-EU spouses of its employees). Earned MA TESL/TEFL, worked international projects for Canadian university, worked 5 years on an exceptional visa at a Dutch uni. Just left, and have just arrived in Toronto for holidays.

My contacts throughout Europe are through training centres, universities, and private language schools. Because I've been acting as a consultant for newbie teachers for some time, I have a general (not in detail country specific) working knowledge of the legalities involved.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cks



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 144

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2010 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Chances are possible if she can obtain an Italian husband within her 90 days.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2010 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I noted in an earlier post the option of swift marraige to a local Very Happy . It worked for a friend of a friend of mine Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Italy All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC