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Teacher demoted for failing students

 
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artemisia



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 867
Location: the world

PostPosted: Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:19 pm    Post subject: Teacher demoted for failing students Reply with quote

In recent times a number of schools have come under investigation as scams that merely allow students the necessary visas to gain residency and then citizenship. A couple of places have already been closed down. Once 'students' are in NZ long enough they qualify for a passport which they then use to transfer to Oz.

People want to live abroad for all sorts of reasons but fake students can certainly have a real impact on teachers.
Here's the latest headline: Teacher demoted for failing students

http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/8400926/teacher-who-failed-poor-students-wins-compensation/

Teacher who failed poor students wins compensation
An Auckland teacher has won $7499 compensation after she was demoted for failing foreign accounting students she said didn't learn anything.

Of the 24 Chinese students in her class at the New Zealand Institute of Commerce in 2004, South African-born Judy Kraidy failed 20, the Weekend Herald reported today.
Another teacher was put in charge of the class and the replacement exam made easier, Mrs Kraidy said.

She took her claim to the Disputes Tribunal, which awarded her $7499 and said the school had made a commercial decision to retain the students.
Mrs Kraidy said the school had promised the students a good qualification if they paid their fees of about $15,000 to $20,000.
She said some students treated the "guaranteed-pass" course as a shortcut to permanent residency, though a few students did genuinely want to learn.

Former school director Nina Hsu said Mrs Kraidy did not have "a loving heart for the students".
The school closed the following year following a slower market and an illness to Ms Hsu's partner.
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artemisia



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 867
Location: the world

PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An update on the same teacher who lost her job actually - not demoted.

Teacher who wouldn't play the game
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10690308

Another school has been told by NZ Qualifications Authority to address its English language testing assessment and moderation systems or face a shut down.
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taylor.1988



Joined: 05 Jul 2011
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 3:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So many crappy language schools around here, especially if you see names such as Victoria Institute or something equally faux-british, probably good to avoid. NO standards. Money raping schemes usually ran by (usually Chinese, no offense) owners who couldnt give a rats ass about student wellbeing. These schools advertise for 'teachers' under 'private advertiser' on jobsites because their rep is so bad.

Basically if it is not in obviously accessible areas of the city, I advise against applying for it. I unwittingly went to an interview for one of those places, and the dude said they are the leading language school in NZ. I was wondering why a reputable ESOL school would be tucked away 3 storeys up above a clothing factory (with no lift), with paint peeling off the grey brick walls + visibly dented and rusted white boards... lol... some nerves on that guy. Its a student trap and poor students get ripped off.
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artemisia



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 867
Location: the world

PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 4:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I was wondering why a reputable ESOL school would be tucked away 3 storeys up above a clothing factory (with no lift), with paint peeling off the grey brick walls + visibly dented and rusted white boards...

You've obviously failed to realise that that IS status in NZ! A three storey building (with or without a lift) is practically a skyscraper in NZ terms. Or so a German once told me, anyway.

Crappy language schools exist the world over - they're all the same.
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taylor.1988



Joined: 05 Jul 2011
Posts: 15

PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lol that is accurate id say, civilisation will come here soon... maybe Shocked
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9649
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, all - just dropping in to throw my twopence worth: crappy schools also thrive in posh surroundings - maybe not in NZ, but don't be fooled by fancy offices. The real stuff is in classrooms, teacher's rooms, and resource rooms: that's what you want to ask to see Very Happy
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artemisia



Joined: 04 Nov 2008
Posts: 867
Location: the world

PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite right, Spiral, but traipsing up 3 flights of stairs daily could be enough to put you off, no matter how good the resource room is!

Re: "civilisation" finally arriving in NZ. Apparently this is going to take place in the form of the Rugby World Cup in Sept/ October. I'm sure all those rugby crowds / beer drinkers will add a lot of rich 'culture' to the place. Cool
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dmocha



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 2011 1:12 pm    Post subject: Students are commodities: income units Reply with quote

Foreign students in the bottom quintile will certainly pass in Canada. They pay big bucks and legitimate universities and colleges are not going to kill the golden goose. But it’s the same for native Canadian students too. I once spoke with civil engineering professor (roads, bridges, dams) who said they could not fail anyone because once the student is not longer on the books the department loses the provincial grant that comes with registration. So in point of fact, a grade of D is really F. Given Canada’s crumbing infrastructure, roads, bridges, dams, this seems to have been going on for some time. Ultimately cash is king and students are ‘basic income units’ or ‘foreign income units’.
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cassava



Joined: 24 Feb 2007
Posts: 164

PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2011 9:57 pm    Post subject: Re: Students are commodities: income units Reply with quote

Quote:
Foreign students in the bottom quintile will certainly pass in Canada. They pay big bucks and legitimate universities and colleges are not going to kill the golden goose.


This is an example of a wild exaggeration and is patent nonsense. Anyone who believes that such is the practice in the Canadian university system in its entirety is obviously delusional. At the university where I work, foreign students fail all the time. Once students, foreign or local, do not meet the required passing grades, they are dismissed. The failure rate in engineering courses, for example, is very high. Does the writer really believe that top notch universities like McGill or Waterloo would have the great reputation that they do if they retained dimwits and ignoramuses in their programs?

Quote:
But it’s the same for native Canadian students too. I once spoke with civil engineering professor (roads, bridges, dams) who said they could not fail anyone because once the student is not longer on the books the department loses the provincial grant that comes with registration.


Native students are found in every province in Canada. To which province is the writer referring? I don't believe a single word of the cited statement. Native students who make it to university usually do so after overcoming tremendous socio-economic problems. They are usually very hard workers. In places like Alberta, Manitoba and Ontario, there are successful lawyers, engineers and physicians who are of native background. Dmocha's statement reflects the kind of racist, stereotypical view that so many Canadians have of the First Nation people, the original inhabitants of Canada.



Quote:
So in point of fact, a grade of D is really F. Given Canada’s crumbing infrastructure, roads, bridges, dams, this seems to have been going on for some time. Ultimately cash is king and students are ‘basic income units’ or ‘foreign income units’.



I am not even going to bother dissecting this sort of ideological claptrap. This kind of obscene generalization does not deserve to be taken seriously.
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dmocha



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2011 10:27 pm    Post subject: Paradise Reply with quote

Calm down cassava, we don't all work in paradise like you do!

I said "native Canadian students" not Canadian ‘native’ as in indigenous students. In no way was I referring to Canada’s indigenous peoples.

Perhaps you could amend/withdraw your final paragraphs as you mistook the meaning of 'native'.
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cassava



Joined: 24 Feb 2007
Posts: 164

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 7:13 pm    Post subject: Re: Paradise Reply with quote

Quote:
I said "native Canadian students" not Canadian ‘native’ as in indigenous students. In no way was I referring to Canada’s indigenous peoples.


Dmocha:

Nice try! However, I am not going to accept your obvious attempt at a semantic hootchy-kootchy. In most classes in a Canadian university, there are students who were born in Canada, immigrant students who were born in foreign countries, visiting students from foreign universities, Commonwealth students who have obtained scholarships awarded by Canadian universities, students who have been given or who are seeking refugee status, etc, etc.

In the multicultural mix that we have in the typical Canadian university, it is impossible to tell who is who by examining "race" or colour. Indeed, those two variables should be of no importance whatsover. Therefore your notion that you were referring only to students born in Canada is little more than a fantasy, a kind of morosophic hallucination.

Even if you were a faculty member, privacy regulations forbid professors from prying into the personal affairs of students. Unless you were gathering data for a study and had obtained permission from the University Senate to investigate the status of students, you would be on ethically shaky grounds in trying to ferret out information about the ethnicity or socio-economic position of students. Professors who indulge in that kind of action run the risk of being fired. To put it bluntly, Dmocha, your argument is a sieve; it doesn't hold any water.

Of greater importance, however, is the fact that you appear to have an axe to grind with the result that your cynical post gives a totally distorted view of tertiary-level education in Canada, and does a disservice to the many successful, hard-working students who have passed through the system.
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dmocha



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 11:55 pm    Post subject: Money does not talk, not even whisper, in Canada. Reply with quote

Ok, Canada is a wonderful paradise where all the students are justly rewarded for their honest efforts. It's only in the US or NZ that instructors have these problems. Money does not talk, not even whisper, in Canada.
Since it never happend to you, it could not have happened to me. Or anyone else. Silly me.

The Chronicle Review
The Shadow Scholar
The man who writes your students' papers tells his story

http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/
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johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12904
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear dmocha,

At last, a way I can supplement my income - by doing the write thing Very Happy.

Regards,
John
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