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Transitioning from EFL teacher to teacher trainer
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
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Location: Terra firma

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 5:46 am    Post subject: Transitioning from EFL teacher to teacher trainer Reply with quote

The question of how to transition from experienced EFL teacher to teacher trainer came up---whether training others in a teaching cert course or as a trainer for in-service teachers. Granted, there are specific courses one could take. However, for qualified, seasoned EFL teachers (i.e., those with a relevant MA, valid TEFL cert, and years of diverse and progressively-responsible teaching experience), I suggest the following:

-- Volunteer to mentor novice teachers.
-- Facilitate new faculty orientation sessions for new teachers.
-- Volunteer to maintain the faculty handbook or parts of it; create a basic handbook, if your workplace doesn't have one.
-- Talk to your higher ups about becoming a lead teacher or coordinator (if you're not already in either role).
-- Assist in reviewing CVs/resumes of potential new teachers; participate in job interviews (or ask to at least sit in on a few).
-- Participate in peer observations and feedback; request others observe your class as well.
-- Request to be mentored by the teacher trainer in your current workplace.
-- Conduct in-house workshops on classroom management, lesson planning, error correction, classroom observations, reflective teaching, etc.
-- Join your local TESOL affiliate and regularly participate in special interest groups (SIGs); attend TESOL events/seminars for your own professional development and networking.
-- Present at TESOL conferences, which, like the previous suggestion, leads to exposure and networking opportunities.
-- Maintain a Linkedin account to stay in touch with teaching colleagues and new connections who might have leads on teacher-training job opportunities.
-- Stay abreast of the latest in technology for teaching/learning and teaching trends and research.
-- Start a TEFL blog; actively post on TEFL discussion sites like the Cafe's job discussion forum and others.
-- Ensure your professional references and recommendation letter writers from your current position mention your mentoring and training.
-- Update your CV/resume to reflect any of the above experience relevant to your present work situation.

Having real hands-on experience and strong qualifications trumps taking a static "how-to" course. Plus, as a teacher trainer, you'll very likely draw and reflect on your own experience as both a teacher and a learner.

In my case, in addition to some of the tips above, I became the go-to person for my colleagues and the pre-service teachers for advice on classroom management issues, student motivation, fun learning activities, ideas for training, etc. I included this info on my CV and subsequently, got a teaching job that entailed major teacher-training responsibilities.

Comments?
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
Posts: 127
Location: peyi kote solèy frèt

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:11 am    Post subject: Re: Transitioning from EFL teacher to teacher trainer Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
Comments?


I'd say that's on target. Over the past three years or so, I've done/started doing about 2/3 of those things. My long-term goal is to semi-retire and become a TEFL certificate trainer.
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PC Parrot



Joined: 11 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The friends of mine that have moved into teacher training have either (1) taken a masters in education to supplement their MA TESOL or (2) taken a doctorate in education.

I would say that their new jobs justify the work they put in.

Those with the EdD entered faculty and almost doubled their TEFL salary. They now earn a cool $11,000 a month - tax free.

If you're going to do it, do it properly!
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nomad soul



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PC Parrot wrote:
Those with the EdD entered faculty and almost doubled their TEFL salary. They now earn a cool $11,000 a month - tax free.

If you're going to do it, do it properly!

That's typical of instructors teaching in a university BA or MA TESOL degree program.
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PC Parrot



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All the more reason to do it properly then.
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PC Parrot wrote:
All the more reason to do it properly then.


And that would be the proper route for those interested in teaching in a university BA or MA TESOL degree program.

There are, however, other teacher training venues where other types of preparation (both formal and informal) would be more appropriate. As I mentioned earlier in this discussion, one of my long term goals is to become a TEFL certificate trainer. In this instance, most providers of such certificates (e.g., CELTA, SIT, etc.) have in house training of trainer programs. I hope to begin working on one such program within the next couple of years.

My current passion, however, is development and delivery of professional development opportunities for faculty colleagues in the U.S.-based community college system where I am currently employed. My development as a faculty trainer in this context has been largely via on-the-job training (or, perhaps, baptism by fire.) Additionally, I've completed a number of generic training of trainer workshops over the past five to six years, mostly rooted in experiential learning theory (e.g., Freire, Vella, et al.) which have helped me hone my skills in this area.
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PC Parrot



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not necessarily.

In my book, doing it properly means receiving training rather than making it up as you go along. You yourself now mention training as one of the steps to teacher training.

I saw no mention of professional training in the the OP's original list. Nor did I see mention of it in your endorsement of the list.
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nomad soul



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For clarification, teaching in a university BA/MA TESOL degree program is generally considered to be teacher education and not teacher training. In other words, the role is as educator, not trainer. Obviously, teaching in the context of an educational program requires a specific set of qualifications, which is why I didn't include it in my post.
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PC Parrot



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Generally considered to be 'teacher education' by whom?

Not by the British Gov't for a start.

http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into-teaching/teacher-training-options/university-based-training

Perhaps it's a US/UK thing.
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esl_prof



Joined: 30 Nov 2013
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
For clarification, teaching in a university BA/MA TESOL degree program is generally considered to be teacher education and not teacher training. In other words, the role is as educator, not trainer. Obviously, teaching in the context of an educational program requires a specific set of qualifications, which is why I didn't include it in my post.


Yes, that's how I understood the initial question.
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esl_prof



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PC Parrot wrote:
Perhaps it's a US/UK thing.


That's certainly possible. Based on our discussion so far, what would you see as some of the key differences?
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PC Parrot



Joined: 11 Dec 2009
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 3:39 am    Post subject: Re: Transitioning from EFL teacher to teacher trainer Reply with quote

nomad soul wrote:
The question of how to transition from experienced EFL teacher to teacher trainer came up---whether training others in a teaching cert course or as a trainer for in-service teachers. Granted, there are specific courses one could take. However, for qualified, seasoned EFL teachers (i.e., those with a relevant MA, valid TEFL cert, and years of diverse and progressively-responsible teaching experience), I suggest the following:


Well perhaps I have misunderstood this.

... But to me the implication is that a seasoned, qualified teacher doesn't need a qualification for teacher training because they know it all already.

They value the qualifications they have but devalue those they don't have.
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rtm



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PC Parrot wrote:
In my book, doing it properly means receiving training rather than making it up as you go along. You yourself now mention training as one of the steps to teacher training.

It's worth noting that most faculty in MA TESOL programs never receive any training on how to teach those courses either. They generally teach them based on their own experiences as ESL teachers, from how they were taught in the teacher education/training classes they took as a student, and from experiences they gain from actually teaching teacher training/education courses.
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GambateBingBangBOOM



Joined: 04 Nov 2003
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

rtm wrote:
PC Parrot wrote:
In my book, doing it properly means receiving training rather than making it up as you go along. You yourself now mention training as one of the steps to teacher training.

It's worth noting that most faculty in MA TESOL programs never receive any training on how to teach those courses either. They generally teach them based on their own experiences as ESL teachers, from how they were taught in the teacher education/training classes they took as a student, and from experiences they gain from actually teaching teacher training/education courses.


Actually, I think they generally have a PhD in the (sub)area (or a very closely related one)- just like any other university professor.
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rtm



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GambateBingBangBOOM wrote:
Actually, I think they generally have a PhD in the (sub)area (or a very closely related one)- just like any other university professor.

Yes, they have content knowledge. PhDs don't generally learn how to do teacher training/education, however. A PhD is a research degree.
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