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Are trains cheap?
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scottie1113



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 340
Location: Gdansk

PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I met a friend who lives in Warsaw on Saturday in Gdansk. Her return ticket to Warsaw only cost her 10 zl. She has made round trips Warsaw-Gdansk for 1 zl each way. The trick is to buy tickets in advance. Even so, it's cheaper, faster, and more comfortable than PKP.

Call bollocks all you want. I saw her ticket.
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simon_porter00



Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 433
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 6:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As usual the nay sayers are out in force.

By the logic suggested so far (by messers Dynow and Walker) we can also assume that because a 1zł/10zł bus fare 'clearly' is impossible (because, hey, that's just my opinion innit) ryanair also 'can't' have air tickets for 1 euro and if they by some miracle chance they do, they'll throw you out mid-air on the German/Polish border.

Some of the arguments on here are ... jeez.
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sparks



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 496

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"that's just my opinion innit) ryanair also 'can't' have air tickets for 1 euro and if they by some miracle chance they do, they'll throw you out mid-air on the German/Polish border."

When I read this I thought of this article from some time ago.

http://wiadomosci.gazeta.pl/Wiadomosci/1,80592,8678825,Bunt_pasazerow_Ryanaira.html

I guess you get what you pay for.
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Jack Walker



Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The fact of the matter is,such a business wouldn't be able to sustain itself if it offered 1zl tickets for example from Warsaw-Gdansk.

If the bus seats 70ish ppl,they wouldn't even cover 1/4 of their fuel expenses.

Not really a good business plan.

There may be a scattered 1zl ticket rolling around but I doubt it is the norm.

You're looking at a 70 or 80 zl bill most of the times on such routes. It still offers an alternative to the PKP and such I guess.

Regards,
Jack
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dynow



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1022

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jackwalker wrote:

Quote:
You're looking at a 70 or 80 zl bill most of the times on such routes.


right. that's my stance as well. maybe the random 1zl or 10zl ticket is available from time to time but no company makes money charging everyone 1zl to travel half way across poland each day.
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Jack Walker



Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dynow wrote:
jackwalker wrote:

Quote:
You're looking at a 70 or 80 zl bill most of the times on such routes.


right. that's my stance as well. maybe the random 1zl or 10zl ticket is available from time to time but no company makes money charging everyone 1zl to travel half way across poland each day.





Exactly Mr Dynow. With the 1zl cross country travel,free country cottage accomodations a la Blasphemer and the previously mentioned 8,000zl per month salaries, the newbs will all be flocking to Poland thinking it's some kind of ESL heaven! Very Happy
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Hod



Joined: 28 Apr 2003
Posts: 915
Location: Home

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 6:39 pm    Post subject: Re: trains Reply with quote

I would like to call bollocks on this. Please?

Hod wrote:
sharter wrote:
You can't buy booze on the trains now.


Even on the Berlin-Warsaw express?
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scottie1113



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 340
Location: Gdansk

PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jack Walker wrote:
The fact of the matter is,such a business wouldn't be able to sustain itself if it offered 1zl tickets for example from Warsaw-Gdansk.

If the bus seats 70ish ppl,they wouldn't even cover 1/4 of their fuel expenses.

Not really a good business plan.

There may be a scattered 1zl ticket rolling around but I doubt it is the norm.

You're looking at a 70 or 80 zl bill most of the times on such routes. It still offers an alternative to the PKP and such I guess.

Regards,
Jack


You're right. As I said, the trick is to book well in advance when they offer promos. The reality is that they do this, but most customers book at the last minute. I don't understand why you guys don't want to believe this. All my Polish friends use polskibus.
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 914
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 5:16 pm    Post subject: Re: trains Reply with quote

Hod wrote:
I would like to call bollocks on this. Please?

Hod wrote:
sharter wrote:
You can't buy booze on the trains now.


Even on the Berlin-Warsaw express?


I've never seen booze for sale on any of the normal trains - Just Lech non-alcoholic which doesn't really count as beer.

You can buy beer from scruffy looking old guys who walk down the corridors grunting 'piwo jasne' (light beer). They're a common sight on Polish trains.

But if you truly must drink on the train, bring it with you. This proud Polish tradition is proven to make those smelly, overcrowded human cattle cars somewhat more bearable.

Over the years I've found it difficult to predict exactly when trains will be overcrowded so I try to bring a few cans of beer, just in case. Wink
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scottie1113



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 340
Location: Gdansk

PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, Shake. Semper Paratus. Good plan.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 500

PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 7:53 am    Post subject: Re: trains Reply with quote

Hod wrote:
I would like to call bollocks on this. Please?

Hod wrote:
sharter wrote:
You can't buy booze on the trains now.


Even on the Berlin-Warsaw express?


International trains aren't included in the ban.

I don't know why they simply don't ban booze on anything but EIC/EC trains - the riff raff likely to cause trouble on trains while drunk are hardly going to shell out for EIC trains!

Also : worth pointing out that trains are often not very overcrowded at all - but if you, for instance, take a train on Friday evening to the seaside, of course it's going to be rammed solid with humanity. That's why they have sleeping cars Wink
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iknowwhatiamtalkingabout



Joined: 02 Sep 2011
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been an occasional reader to this forum for a number of years, and have seen countless threads like this.

People upset at Poland being expensive/wages being low and generally complaining about everything. These people paint a picture that it is impossible to get by on the wages on offer.

It's nonsense. I'm just about to start my fifth year in Poland and I started out on one of these apparently "unacceptable" jobs on 1800 a month. Of course, when you consider that my rent and bills (in a nice flat) were paid, it was well over 1800 a month. Indeed, I stayed for 3 years. I went out for dinner regularly, went out drinking 3 or 4 nights a week, paid extra for internet in my flat, travelled around Poland extensively and just generally had a really good time. I also received really good training at the first school, to the extent that subsequent employers comment that it is obvious that I have been well trained.

My advice to new teachers who are single, have no kids, and no expectations of living like a king, then come to Poland and enjoy yourself. Ignore the scaremongering on this thread. Polish students are great and you can have a good lifestyle in Poland.

If you are older and have very refined tastes, or you have a spouse or children to support, then Poland is simply not for you. Go elsewhere.

For people reading these miserable posts from some people with experiences of Poland, remember that the vast majority of teachers in Poland don't spend their time complaining on a messageboard. They are too busy having fun.
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dynow



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1022

PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iknowwhatimtalkingabout wrote:

Quote:
My advice to new teachers who are single, have no kids, and no expectations of living like a king, then come to Poland and enjoy yourself.


i think this more or less sums it up. if you are married, have kids and don't like to rely on Biedronka for your daily rations....you know, adult life.....go elsewhere. if you're 22 and running free.....sure, you'll have a good time there for a year or two.
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iknowwhatiamtalkingabout



Joined: 02 Sep 2011
Posts: 64

PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never shop in Biedronka. I eat well, I drink well, have a very active social life, even travel around Poland occasionally to watch football or visit friends.

You just have to be sensible. You can't eat at the most expensive restaurant in town, but then I couldn't do that at home.

From reading these threads I think some people just have unrealistic expectations. How can someone reasonably expect to teach English in Poland and maintain an expensive lifestyle? It's pretty tough. But that doesn't mean we are all on the breadline. I'm certainly not, and none of my friends are.

I just wish people would stop the scaremongering on here.

If you have kids, or a wife to support, then you have no business in Poland and I don't know why you would even try it. Go somewhere else, or get into a different job. Just stop complaining, please. Teaching and living in Poland is good. Best move I ever made.
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Jack Walker



Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2011 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Poland always reminds me of the movie "Dazed and Confused".It's a great ride for awhile.Loads of fun.Wine, women and song non-stop.

Alas,the end of summer party at the moon tower arrives.You have your last drink and toke and then most decide to move on and get on with life while a few decide to stick around in the dazed zone and keep on partying and putting off the real world.
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