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Tuition free study in higher education in Scandinavia?
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saren



Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 60

PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 7:41 pm    Post subject: Tuition free study in higher education in Scandinavia? Reply with quote

Tuition free study in higher education in Scandinavia?

I am an English teacher, and have decided to go back to school, but a little short on cash. I need to do some research regarding Scandinavian educational offers to foreigners, and any way I can come to live there, and study there (for a 4 year degree) tuition-free, meaning I become a resident of that country, and enroll in the cost-free, or lower-cost education services they offer to all residents. I need to know which country, and which universities offer the best offer (and I mean offer by the lowest cost to me) to come and study foreign languages there.

Most people in most countries pay thousands to study at a university. But in the Nordic countries, I've heard higher education is free. I want to apply to become a resident and then enroll in a languages program in one of these institutions.

My preferred countries are: Sweden, Norway, Iceland, and Estonia.

If you are a foreigner and you did this, or are a Scandinavian with first hand knowledge of this issue, please reply. Thank you.
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sparks



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 509

PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Higher education is free in many other countries in Europe. In Poland you can even get a stipend to live. All that you must do is pass the entrance exams.

Have you really looked into this? I would guess that you would have be a citizen of the country to qualify for this--this is a substantial hurdle as it would most likely require years of residency. If your not you would have to pay like all other foreign students.
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Dedicated



Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 748
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sat Apr 10, 2010 10:00 pm    Post subject: Re :Norway Reply with quote

Saren,

I can only speak about Norway from personal experience. To qualify for free university tuition, you must be a Norwegian citizen.

To become a Norwegian citizen, you have to be a resident in Norway for 7 years, and complete 300 hours of Norwegian language training, as undergraduate degrees are virtually all taught in Norwegian. Postgraduate degrees are often in English.

When you apply, you have to renounce your own citizenship, as Norway generally does not accept dual citizenship (unless one parent is Norwegian). For males, there is mandatory military service of 19 months for all between 18.5 and 44 (55 in case of war).

Norway is the most expensive European country, and to get a visa you have to provide documentation of subsistence (ie. funds in the bank) which currently are NOK 83,000 (about £11.000 a year) just to live.
Accommodation and transport are very expensive.
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saren



Joined: 19 Nov 2007
Posts: 60

PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, so which country offers tuition free education for non-eu citizens?
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Dedicated



Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 748
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 6:07 am    Post subject: Re :Sweden Reply with quote

In Sweden, from 1st January 2010, non-EU/EES students will have to pay fees, which on average are between 80,000 - 100,000 SEK a year(approx 8,500 Euros upwards).

Then of course, you have the very expensive living costs....

Check out this website < www.studyinsweden.se>

I fear the days of free education in Scandinavia are now over, as they were becoming swamped with international students, expecting a free ride.

I would imagine Iceland, which is bankrupt, would scarcely be handing out free education any more.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9486
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, so which country offers tuition free education for non-eu citizens?


Sorry, but I don't see the logic here.
Why should a country educate a non-citizen for free?

What would their own citizens think?
Citizens of the countries you name pay outstandingly high taxes to provide (among other things) free education for their children.

Lots of EU countries provide free higher education for their own citizens. I know of none that will do this for foreigners.

Again, why should they?
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GF



Joined: 08 Jun 2003
Posts: 191
Location: Tallinn

PostPosted: Sun Apr 11, 2010 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oops. Looks like no free lunch here.
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ghostrider



Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 147

PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 6:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, I had the same idea as the OP. If I had applied a year or two ago I would have gotten in before the reforms, but it's too late now. That said, I have other reasons for wanting to live in northern Europe, particularly Sweden, so I may just go for it even at the extra cost. Trouble now is funding. They won't let you in if you've barely got any money in the bank.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8996
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Thu Jun 03, 2010 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I konw of a guy who got into Sweden in 2005, studied there, met a girl, then was offered a job after one year of language classes, because of the job, he stayed.

Then because he lived with a Swedish woman, after three years he qualified for citizenship. Cohibation, (heterosexual or homosexual) lowers the five years to three. He just got citizenship a bit ago.

I don't think that this is common, but it's possible.
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misteradventure



Joined: 18 Aug 2003
Posts: 243

PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm most familiar with Sweden. All of the students I met graduated with student loans approaching those of US graduates.

Keeping in mind that these loans were EXCLUSIVELY for living expenses, as tuition was 'free', I failed to see the rationale for enduring yet another frigid winter where the booze was expensive and the days far too short.
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jonniboy



Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 693
Location: Riga, Latvia

PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 10:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Tuition free study in higher education in Scandinavia? Reply with quote

saren wrote:
Most people in most countries pay thousands to study at a university. But in the Nordic countries, I've heard higher education is free. I want to apply to become a resident and then enroll in a languages program in one of these institutions.

My preferred countries are: Sweden, Norway, Iceland, and Estonia.


Estonia is doing better than a lot of East European countries sure, but it is still a long long way away from having the same economy as Norway or Sweden. Highly unlikely they'll give free tuition to foreigners. That said cost of living and tuition fees there are way below what you'd pay in Oslo or Stockholm so it's a more realistic choice if finance is an issue. However very few courses there will be taught in English so your choice would be very limited.
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ancient_dweller



Joined: 12 Aug 2010
Posts: 415
Location: Woodland Bench

PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

still free in Finland though. That's nordic right?

plus Finns have extra kudos because the Russians invaded in the 1940's and lost. 500,000 soviet soldiers perished trying to take the Finns. it wasn't lucky enough to have been graced with being part of the USSR.
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Basilm87



Joined: 23 Nov 2008
Posts: 21
Location: Midg�rd/London/Beijing

PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ancient_dweller wrote:
still free in Finland though. That's nordic right?

plus Finns have extra kudos because the Russians invaded in the 1940's and lost. 500,000 soviet soldiers perished trying to take the Finns. it wasn't lucky enough to have been graced with being part of the USSR.


May I ask, as I'm not Finnish (I'm Swedish) what, if any universities in Finland are free to undertake study at, as a non-citizen? As the larger and more prestigious ones seem all to have certain fees, even though fairly low compared to the US/UK.

About the kudos; Finland sure indeed held off the Russians good at the end of 1939 onwards, even though you are forgetting the roughly 10,000 Swedes with a few dozen million rounds of ammunition, twelve airplanes for bombing purposes, roughly a hundred artilliery pieces, roughly a hundred anti-air machineguns; a few hundred thousand grenades, a dozen doctors, tents and so on....
Finland also received help from Norway and most likely UK, even though that was a big hush-hush.

The Russian casualties amounted up to somewhere around 200,000 according to Finnish, Swedish and German governments (120k said the Russians). So I believe the figure 500,000 is fairly off.

What made Finland (and allies) come out the victor was most likely: superior equipment, konskenkorva and Simo Häyhä.
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GF



Joined: 08 Jun 2003
Posts: 191
Location: Tallinn

PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to A Frozen Hell by William R. Trotter, Molotov claimed the Soviets lost 48,745 dead and another 159,000 wounded, while the author states the actual toll was 230,000-270,000 dead and another 200,000 to 300,000 wounded.

The website http://www.winterwar.com/War'sEnd/casualti.htm#soviet states the total Soviet casualty figure to be 391,783 (not including cases of sickness), based on the research of G.F.Krivosheev.

I believe the full truth will never be known.
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Mrguay84



Joined: 03 Dec 2009
Posts: 125

PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I can get a "Swedish partner", then what are the chances of a free Postgraduate degree?

That would be WIN! WIN!
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