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scottie1113



Joined: 25 Oct 2004
Posts: 353
Location: Gdansk

PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 3:14 pm    Post subject: Re: 1 final thing Reply with quote

[quote="sharter"]

'Goracy Kubeks'

What does this mean? I don't mean the literal translation, but what is it?
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sharter



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 878
Location: All over the place

PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 3:37 pm    Post subject: ha ha Reply with quote

It's a kind of Pot Noodle......or Cuppa Soup; the inference being that they're so skint they're living on them.

Try one next time you're in Jabka...they're ok.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 555

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 10:40 am    Post subject: Re: 1 final thing Reply with quote

sharter wrote:
And 1 final thing: How many women TEFL teachers do you know who've been there as long as the lads? Any?


How many women stick it out in TEFL full stop in a foreign country? I have a friend who's here for the 3rd year in a row, but they really aren't common anywhere.

Quote:
! or 2 of them have discovered a liking for 'Goracy Kubeks'.....that's how tough it can be out there.


That's exactly what I like about Poland - if you can cook, you can access a huge amount of cheap seasonal ingredients, far more than in most countries. In fact, they're so cheap compared to wages that there's no reason not to learn, and in Poznan in particular - you've got lots of marketplaces to buy them.

No need to go near a Goracy Kubek. No need at all.

Quote:
The OP is about wages.........they've barely risen in more than a decade. I was making 6K in 97 working 25 hours a week with a free room at the akademik. Would I prefer to live in Poznan? Hell yeah. However, I wouldn't want to do it as a teacher. Value for money? Well, I think the chap looking at places in Florida answered that question. I would hazard a guess and say that you and I are used to very different standards of living. I don't much like the Middle East but it'll pay for me to have a long-term future in Poznan. No pain, no gain.


So really, it all boils down to this : you can stay in Poland and have a great time, you won't be wealthy, but you'll have a hell of a lot of fun and make some very good friends for life.

But just like in every country, a long term future means finding a partner that also works and you can't be afraid of hard work.

Quote:
You're welcome to your opinion but you don't have the contacts I have made over the past 16 years in Poz....so don't get head of yourself. You're trying to sell oil to an Arab.


Honestly, I can't imagine these contacts are up to much if they're booking you 550zl rooms at the Polonez instead of finding you something decent at a much better price.
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gwiazda



Joined: 07 May 2010
Posts: 13
Location: Poland

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 11:39 am    Post subject: Re: 1 final thing Reply with quote

sharter wrote:
And 1 final thing: How many women TEFL teachers do you know who've been there as long as the lads? Any?

The lads, myself included, are/were there precisely because of the beer and whisky and beautiful girls;


Oh honestly gentlemen. There are plenty of female Tefl teachers who've been here for ages. As you're well aware there is so much more to Poland than beer and beautiful girls. I've personally been here ages - I won't say how long exactly as it might give away my age - which would be a most unladylike thing to do Smile and for me Tefl in Poland is a long term choice.

The financial aspect of living in Poland is actually a plus for me...the opportunity to buy property without taking out a huge mortgage is something I couldn't resist. But a few things I would say about how to make Tefl in Poland financially viable long term...

1) As delphine said - learn Polish. You'll need to be able to communicate effectively in order to negociate with businesses.
2) Don't work just for a language school. Teach in-company classes directly for businesses.
3) Consider location carefully. All this talk of prices in Poznan is so far off the cost of living in my part of Polska that its almost like you're talking about another planet. Also in an area with fewer Native Speakers you can charge a premium for your classes.
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maniak



Joined: 06 Feb 2008
Posts: 194

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 2:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

Insurance is ridiculously cheap in Poland by European standards, petrol isn't much if you buy a car with a decent engine, repairs can be insanely cheap if it's purely labour, there aren't much tolls, paid parking isn't very expensive (you can get a space in the very centre of Poznan for 400zl a month in a guarded car park) and as for mechanic - knowing a thing or two about cars tends to avoid this happening.


Jesus f'ing christ... I guess this post kind of sums up you don't own a car or really have any idea what you're talking about. Btw, nice drawback on living in Sweden, running out of vodka on Saturday and having to wait till Monday. Guess that seals the deal for you.

Point by point Delph: Insurance is not cheap if you include like any normal person would comprehensive coverage (I pay 1600zl a year for a 12 year old diesel VW golf, a friend pays 2200zl for a 6 year old Nissan, etc etc I can go on for hours, these are for normal people who own their own cars and dont have a parent co-owner who gets discounts), and I dont know why you are comparing it you "European standards"... did you forget you live in Poland and earn polish zlotys? Again, petrol and diesel: incredibly expensive, I think its cheaper in Spain now, it costs me 300zl per tank now with diesel at 5.6zl/L, and even getting 7-8L/100km makes weekend trips to the mountains painful, I guess its my fault I cant afford a "decent engine", whatever that means. What's next, hahaha insanely cheap repairs, so you really dont know what you're talking about. Go find out how much a basic oil/filter change costs with decent oil. Or enjoy some major suspension work every 2 years or so due to *beep* roads. Labor is very expensive in the major cities, most ASO's charge around 80-100zl an hour. I know one guy got charged 20zl to have a lightbulb changed!!

Tolls, yea there aren't that many tolls but when they're are you pay through the nose, it costs me 30zl to get from Wroclaw-Krakow, almost 130zl to the seaside. Some of the most expensive highways in Europe, in Austria you pay 12eur and you can drive on everything for a week. Oh yea, paid parking, 400zl a month is almost 5000zl. You got 5000zl lying around just for... parking? I dont, I bike.

And the last quote is a gem. "Knowing a thing or two about cars"... So what two things do you need to know? An engine needs fuel, air and spark? You need 4 wheels? What you need is either an honest mechanic which are very difficult to find because the second they see youre a foreigner you are toast, or indepth mechanical knowledge which uhhh would qualify you to fix your own damn car (it took me 3 years to find mine, but he's in far out of town so it involves some major logistical problems when I leave the car for a day or two). And btw, how can you check the guy used the parts you bought and not some used crap? How can you confirm that the oil was changed with the oil you bought? Maybe now you'll suggest people just fix their own cars or something... yea, just invest a few thousands of zl in tools. Oh yea, build your own garage too.

Quote:

My hobby is travelling, and I don't find it expensive. Skiing? Aren't there resorts in Poland/Czech Republic where a lift pass is about 100zl for a day at the most?


100zl a day is cheap for you? Here's a newflash, Austrian and Italian ski resorts are cheaper, oh yea lets not forget you can ski for free early/late season. I guess its my own damned fault how expensive equipment is in Poland. I broke my last pair of goggles, new on allegro... 500zl. I just bought them on ebay in the US for $60 new.

Quote:

At that price, you must have really skipped out on the insulation/etc.


What a clever retort, yea I sure did, 15cm. Look, you dont really know what you talking about, thats how much it costs to heat an average 180m2 house. Thats how much everyone pays. Thats how much life costs in Poland. Im just shaking my head right now, you really do live in some bubble. I dont mean any ill will, but just wait until you fall sick, I mean something involving a few days in a hospital, maybe that'll open your eyes.
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dynow



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1038

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

delphian-domine wrote:

Quote:
As for living here in the long run - who knows? I mean, every country has its drawbacks - you could move to a very happy country like Sweden, yet when you run out of vodka on a Saturday night party, you're stuffed until Monday morning. Here, you just pop to the local shop.


I gotta say, I was hoping for an answer with a little more substance than mentioning how booze is always readily available in Poland. Hardly a reason to stay but hey.....I remember my 20's as well.

gwiazda wrote:

Quote:
in my part of Polska


sorry man, but I for one don't want to live in Dumpsville Zdroj to find cheap real estate in Poland of all places. if I'm gonna live in a country like Poland, I want to feel like I'm living in the 21st century. living "na wsi" loses its novelty real quick.

maniak wrote:
Quote:

I broke my last pair of goggles, new on allegro... 500zl. I just bought them on ebay in the US for $60 new.


I flew home once a year not only to see my family but to do literally ALL my shopping for the year. shoes, sweaters, winter coat, absolutely anything i needed I would save up all year and buy when i got to the USA.

Poland's a ripoff for basically everything.
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sharter



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 878
Location: All over the place

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 6:59 pm    Post subject: erm Reply with quote

I think the consensus is that Poland's expensive.

And Gwiazda....I know just about all of the long-term teachers in Poznan and not 1, I repeat NOT ONE is female. However, out here in the Gulf there are tonnes of long-term lady TEFL residents. Why? The Middle East is to women what Eastern Europe is to men Smile


Love Poland-can't afford to live there right now. It's definitely a place where you're just about ok till something goes wrong. The tyre, the filling, the time off work, the cancellation, your kid's sick, someone nicks something, someone doesn't pay you, a pipe bursts....that kinda thing. It's a frugal struggle. Then again, it's all relative. We've got folks in Kuwait who think it's cheap largely because they skip meals, never go out, haggle over 50 cents with taxi drivers and rip off Asian comfort ladies. Nice. And let's not forget how people don't smile much in Eastern Europe......probably cos they're skint or up to their eyeballs in IKEA store card debt.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 555

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

maniak wrote:
Jesus f'ing christ... I guess this post kind of sums up you don't own a car or really have any idea what you're talking about. Btw, nice drawback on living in Sweden, running out of vodka on Saturday and having to wait till Monday. Guess that seals the deal for you.


It's a great way to illustrate how utterly difficult life can be in Sweden on a practical level. I could go on if you want, such as how social insurance contributions are absolutely crippling for small businesses there. If you think the 20% in Poland for employers is high - 33% in Sweden is positively eyewatering. Then - corporation tax there is much higher than in Poland, too.

That's before we start talking about

Quote:
Point by point Delph: Insurance is not cheap if you include like any normal person would comprehensive coverage (I pay 1600zl a year for a 12 year old diesel VW golf, a friend pays 2200zl for a 6 year old Nissan, etc etc I can go on for hours, these are for normal people who own their own cars and dont have a parent co-owner who gets discounts), and I dont know why you are comparing it you "European standards"... did you forget you live in Poland and earn polish zlotys?


1600zl for a 12 year old golf? Are you not being absolutely robbed there, unless you've got a dodgy driving history? Mine is roughly the same for a not-old Astra, fully comprehensive - including the lovely green card for every single country that's part of the scheme, unlike most Western insurers who either won't include them or will demand a lot more money. Try getting a green card for UA from a British insurer!

(mine isn't co-owned either, I've just got a decent amount of no-claims years and shop around every year for the cheapest insurance, like anyone sensible would do given the ease of doing so)

Quote:
Again, petrol and diesel: incredibly expensive, I think its cheaper in Spain now, it costs me 300zl per tank now with diesel at 5.6zl/L, and even getting 7-8L/100km makes weekend trips to the mountains painful, I guess its my fault I cant afford a "decent engine", whatever that means.


Pretty much - mine uses around 5L-100km at the most on long drives. Old engines are incredibly inefficient. Of course, the roads here don't help fuel economy, which is why it's wise to take trips to places where you spend most of your time driving and not slowing down every two minutes for crap villages. It's the reason why I don't go to the seaside in Poland - I don't want to waste my time with 5 hours of endless tedious villages.

Quote:
What's next, hahaha insanely cheap repairs, so you really dont know what you're talking about. Go find out how much a basic oil/filter change costs with decent oil. Or enjoy some major suspension work every 2 years or so due to *beep* roads. Labor is very expensive in the major cities, most ASO's charge around 80-100zl an hour. I know one guy got charged 20zl to have a lightbulb changed!!


Learn to speak Polish, and you won't pay such prices. Case in point : I just had some repairs done that took about 2 hours to fix - cost me 80zl in labour costs, and the job is well done. But then - I knew exactly what was wrong, how to fix it and had no interest in paying through the nose for it.

As for an oil/filter change - can't you do it yourself? I do - it's a simple job.

And as for major suspension work - maybe try avoiding the holes more?

Quote:
Tolls, yea there aren't that many tolls but when they're are you pay through the nose, it costs me 30zl to get from Wroclaw-Krakow, almost 130zl to the seaside. Some of the most expensive highways in Europe, in Austria you pay 12eur and you can drive on everything for a week. Oh yea, paid parking, 400zl a month is almost 5000zl. You got 5000zl lying around just for... parking? I dont, I bike.


And you think that they would bother to enforce the law on vignettes here if one existed? They can't even be bothered to enforce the existing law, let alone protect GDDKiA revenue.

As for paid parking - that's in the very centre of the city. My own paid-parking is 115zl a month, hardly "expensive".

Quote:
And the last quote is a gem. "Knowing a thing or two about cars"... So what two things do you need to know? An engine needs fuel, air and spark? You need 4 wheels? What you need is either an honest mechanic which are very difficult to find because the second they see youre a foreigner you are toast, or indepth mechanical knowledge which uhhh would qualify you to fix your own damn car (it took me 3 years to find mine, but he's in far out of town so it involves some major logistical problems when I leave the car for a day or two).


I find in Poland, knowing what you want fixed and knowing the price of such repairs tends to be a good way to avoid any trouble. They want to jack up the price because it's a foreigner? Walk away. Agree everything in advance, and refuse to take any nonsense. Not difficult. Crying about "oh, it's a different country and it's how it's done here" is just ridiculous - anyone that takes that kind of crap deserves to get ripped off.

As for needing in-depth mechanical knowledge - not really, cars aren't complicated things. The worst thing to happen is the electronics going, but mechanical things? Most stuff can be diagnosed pretty easily, especially as modern cars have the ability to output diagnostic codes which tell you what the fault is anyway.

Quote:
And btw, how can you check the guy used the parts you bought and not some used crap? How can you confirm that the oil was changed with the oil you bought? Maybe now you'll suggest people just fix their own cars or something... yea, just invest a few thousands of zl in tools. Oh yea, build your own garage too.


Oil - I do my own, it's easy. The parts? Use a reputable garage with a good reputation and - just like in other countries - they won't mess you around with such crap.

Quote:
My hobby is travelling, and I don't find it expensive. Skiing? Aren't there resorts in Poland/Czech Republic where a lift pass is about 100zl for a day at the most?


Quote:
100zl a day is cheap for you? Here's a newflash, Austrian and Italian ski resorts are cheaper, oh yea lets not forget you can ski for free early/late season. I guess its my own damned fault how expensive equipment is in Poland. I broke my last pair of goggles, new on allegro... 500zl. I just bought them on ebay in the US for $60 new.


You can't compare US and Europe prices, because they aren't comparable. Those $60 goggles are from someone who isn't paying payroll social taxes, who isn't paying sales tax, all the things that the allegro seller probably is.

What's with people trying to compare Europe and the US on here? Doing a more realistic comparison would be with Slovakia/Lithuania or maybe Germany.

Anyway, 100zl a day is cheap for me, sure. Again - two people working.

Quote:
What a clever retort, yea I sure did, 15cm. Look, you dont really know what you talking about, thats how much it costs to heat an average 180m2 house. Thats how much everyone pays. Thats how much life costs in Poland. Im just shaking my head right now, you really do live in some bubble. I dont mean any ill will, but just wait until you fall sick, I mean something involving a few days in a hospital, maybe that'll open your eyes.


Most people living in 180m2 houses really aren't going to be too bothered by 1000zl a month in heating costs. Why would they, when they probably have a huge joint salary by Polish standards?

ESL teachers on the other hand might find it difficult, but that's because it's not exactly corporate vice-director level. I doubt you'll find many teachers in the UK living in huge houses too.

As for hospitals - I've seen enough people lying in corridors in British hospitals.

[quote=sharter]And Gwiazda....I know just about all of the long-term teachers in Poznan and not 1, I repeat NOT ONE is female.[/quote]

That's because they don't sit in the pub, not because they don't exist. I know some, and most of them have families.

Quote:
Love Poland-can't afford to live there right now. It's definitely a place where you're just about ok till something goes wrong. The tyre, the filling, the time off work, the cancellation, your kid's sick, someone nicks something, someone doesn't pay you, a pipe bursts....that kinda thing.


Funny that you mention not being paid. Why haven't you slagged off this very true aspect of doing business here? If you said that "Poland is fine, but people will do absolutely everything in their power to avoid paying you" - I'd agree with you 100%.

(on a serious note, why the hell isn't there a blacklist of schools on here?)
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dynow



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1038

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's always entertaining Delph to see you battling it out with people and watch you continue to paint such a rosy picture of poland.....

Delphian-domine wrote:

Quote:
Oil - I do my own, it's easy.


OK....so I'm a TEFL'er, living in an apartment on the 5th floor, my car is parked outside on the street, it's November, December, January, February, March.....shite weather so to speak.....and I'd like to change my oil by myself. Walk me through how that happens.

Delphian-domine wrote:

Quote:
It's the reason why I don't go to the seaside in Poland - I don't want to waste my time with 5 hours of endless tedious villages.


endless tedious villages? you've just described the entire country.

delphian-domine wrote:

Quote:
The worst thing to happen is the electronics going,


if you think an electrical problem is the worst thing that can happen to a car.....well.....I'd suggest walking over to your mechanic, using your polish skills you speak of and asking him how much a blown transmission would run you, a new clutch or maybe a cracked engine block.

delphian-domine wrote:

Quote:
especially as modern cars have the ability to output diagnostic codes which tell you what the fault is anyway.


who's got a "modern car" in Poland? most poles are still driving old beaters and i can assure you the avg. TEFL'er isn't driving anything better, if they're driving anything at all.

I don't know how you do it Delph but if it keeps you sane out there, keep telling yourself these things. All the power to you but when I read this stuff, I just see pure nonsense.
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 555

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 11:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
OK....so I'm a TEFL'er, living in an apartment on the 5th floor, my car is parked outside on the street, it's November, December, January, February, March.....shite weather so to speak.....and I'd like to change my oil by myself. Walk me through how that happens.


Uh, it's December and it's 8-9c outside. Given that I'm from a country where 20c is "hot", it's really not much of a stretch to do an oil change in this weather. It's not cold at all - and anyway, most of the time taken is waiting for the oil to totally drain.

Anyway, since when do all TEFL'ers live in 5th floor apartments?

Quote:
if you think an electrical problem is the worst thing that can happen to a car.....well.....I'd suggest walking over to your mechanic, using your polish skills you speak of and asking him how much a blown transmission would run you, a new clutch or maybe a cracked engine block.


These don't tend to go on newish cars.

Quote:
who's got a "modern car" in Poland? most poles are still driving old beaters and i can assure you the avg. TEFL'er isn't driving anything better, if they're driving anything at all.


I think you're mistaking Poland for another country, perhaps Ukraine. I mean, I walk past decent modern cars in my guarded parking every day - not much "old beaters" there. The guy in the parking space next to me just got rid of his last car and bought a brand new Audi, and I don't live in an especially rich area. Quite a few other new cars lying there too.

Quote:
I don't know how you do it Delph but if it keeps you sane out there, keep telling yourself these things. All the power to you but when I read this stuff, I just see pure nonsense.


You only see nonsense because you didn't earn enough in Poland to see how the "other" side lives. I suspect that you also only wanted to see the bad things towards the end.

As for how I do it - simple. I work normally (11 months a year), I work a normal workload, I have a job with managerial responsibility (not just a plain old "turn up, teach some crap from a book, leave" job, and I'm paid accordingly) and my wife has her own business that does very well.

Oh, and I know how to fix things instead of needing my hand held for every little job. And if I can't do it myself, I know what it costs to provide the service and won't be taken for a ride.

Mind you, the average TEFL'er probably doesn't want to be stuck in an office half of the day, dealing with paperwork and suchlike. The hours of the job are, after all, a huge attraction.
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dynow



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1038

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Delphian-domine wrote:

Quote:

Uh, it's December and it's 8-9c outside. Given that I'm from a country where 20c is "hot", it's really not much of a stretch to do an oil change in this weather. It's not cold at all - and anyway, most of the time taken is waiting for the oil to totally drain.

Anyway, since when do all TEFL'ers live in 5th floor apartments?


hahaha, first and foremost, that's totally your style. mentioning it's 8-9C outside as if it's the norm for a Polish winter. but with temperature aside, again, walk me through it. how do i change the oil in my car, parked on the street, in any month of the year. walk me through it, and stop dodging.

Delph wrote:

Quote:
You only see nonsense because you didn't earn enough in Poland to see how the "other" side lives.


Now you're telling me that I lived in a different Poland because I didn't make as much money as you currently do? You can't be serious with that crap. Although, you not paying rent for your first 2+ years in Poland certainly puts you at a different level.

Grasping for straws man.

I find it hard to believe you can type all this with a straight face.
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Jack Walker



Joined: 23 Oct 2008
Posts: 412

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 2:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Running a car is ridiculously expensive in Poland. More expensive than anywhere else I've been.

When I first arrived there in 2003, I bought a 1990 Renault clunker for 4,000zl and sold it when I left in 2010 for 700zl

Luckily, I had a mechanic father-in-law during my tenure there and all the work was done gratis and let me tell you,there was lots of work to be done over the years and that saved me tons of cash.

I couldn't afford anything better and keeping that car on the road and somewhat roadworthy, took a big chunk of my income. The fuel prices alone were astronomical and I'm sure they are even worse now.
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sharter



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 878
Location: All over the place

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 4:32 am    Post subject: ha ha Reply with quote

'My wife has her own business, which is doing very well'.

So that's your secret.

Seriously tho'-There was a thread a long while back about duffer schools and businesses that have short arms and long pockets.

Low paying schools like IH, Bell, and JDJ (Shady J) featured prominently. Now you've got loads of these ALM type schools...Berlitz, Callanspeed, Avalon and so on. Linguarama did really well in Poznan; they cleaned up in the business English sector. I never understood why the school closed. PN and JD started off there....must've been 99. I'd already been in Poland 3 years by then. Still-what do I know?

What/Who do you manage Delph? Give it a free plug.....
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simon_porter00



Joined: 09 Nov 2005
Posts: 464
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dynow,
Are you a politician? The reason I ask is that you seem to have an amazing ability to read a post and yet somehow completely misconstrue what the poster is writing e.g.:

Quote:
mentioning it's 8-9C outside as if it's the norm for a Polish winter


DD didn't say that at all.

Quote:
endless tedious villages? you've just described the entire country.

which ironically was written after
Quote:
I gotta say, I was hoping for an answer with a little more substance


Anyhow, no doubt you'll accuse me of being a politician too and misinterpreting you etc so I'll stop. These just made laugh out loud.

I've no time to enter into these arguments as I wish I had, however in general I do find myself agreeing with DD a lot and sharter has some interesting points to make.

In short I always believed that in a city a teacher (after a year or two under their belt) should be making much more than 4k a month. Much more. Even if you're by yourself, that easily covers rent/room, food, travelling (some trips a month), mobile phone, beer money etc.
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Richfilth



Joined: 24 Sep 2007
Posts: 225
Location: Warszawa

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm almost banging my head against the table in frustration at the scoffing arrogance displayed here, especially by Dynow.

You ran off from Poland with your bride in tow and your tail between your legs, and yet you still come on here to "give advice"? It's painful to look at.

Arguing about how to do an oil change in mid-winter? Really? Either you're deliberately trolling the forum, or you've got so angry about your time spent in Poland that you're no longer able to discuss a topic coherently.

If you want to discuss cars, I'm more than game. My car is the oldest, rustiest *beep* in the whole district, seeing as I am but a humble TEFLer. But although my neighbours own new Audis and Toyotas, my *beep* resides in a fully tooled-up garage, all bought and paid for with the money I made in Poland. And that's not money I married into, donated by generous in-laws; it's cash made through the not-particularly-hard graft of giving proper language lessons. Do your job properly, and you'll make the same sort of money. Whinge, moan, gripe and grumble, and your students will walk away and leave you to your impoverished sulk.

But this thread was supposed to be about International House, and yet again the usual suspects have dragged it down into a besmirching of Poland in general.
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