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European Classrooms vs. Asian Classrooms
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ach. As I noted before, one of the best teachers I know worked in Korea for a couple of years.

However, over a decade of teaching in Europe, plus her MA and DELTA are the qualities that make her one of the best teachers I've ever worked with. Not the two years in Korea at the start of her career; if that were all she'd had when she applied here, no one would have taken her seriously. (BTW, she knows and agrees with this).
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DosEquisX



Joined: 09 Dec 2010
Posts: 341

PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To me, it appears that the less experience you have teaching in Asia the easier the transition will be to Europe with regards to classroom environment.

I sense that teachers with teaching experience in just Asia tend to develop teaching habits that probably aren't suitable for teaching in Europe. Like the old saying goes, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks." A middle-aged man with a decade of teaching experience in China would probably have more trouble transitioning than a 20-something with only 1-2 years of teaching in Asia.

Does this make sense to anybody here?
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Posted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:26 am Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To me, it appears that the less experience you have teaching in Asia the easier the transition will be to Europe with regards to classroom environment.

I sense that teachers with teaching experience in just Asia tend to develop teaching habits that probably aren't suitable for teaching in Europe. Like the old saying goes, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks." A middle-aged man with a decade of teaching experience in China would probably have more trouble transitioning than a 20-something with only 1-2 years of teaching in Asia.

Does this make sense to anybody here



Yes, it makes sense to some degree. The only potential flaw in that reasoning here is that the 20-something will need to seek and be able to take on board the training he/she will need to do things differently - and that can be difficult regardless of age and experience, for some people.

I think the key to a successful transition from Asia to Europe is understanding up front that it's a very different type of job from the start and being ready and willing to re-educate onesself. Could happen (or not) at any age, but you are probably correct that the longer one has done what works well in Asia, the harder those practices are to give up.
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kpjf



Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Posts: 145

PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, I guess people think it's easier going from Europe (having European experience) to Asia to teach, rather than from Asia --> Europe?
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not me. I can't play the guitar, sing, or throw beanbags - in fact, I don't even like what many teachers call 'ice breakers' or 'warmups' - basically, I'm the serious type. The only class in my teaching history in which I crashed and burned was one with 80% Asian language tourist students (in Canada). They were bored, and I found them uninspired/ing.

So far as my personal take on it, it's really two very different skill sets. I can claim only one of them. Few teachers I know really have a good grasp on both.
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DosEquisX



Joined: 09 Dec 2010
Posts: 341

PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm quite happy that the whole performance nonsense is taken out of teaching in Europe. I didn't mind it when I first started, but now it's sad and insulting to me.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, if you got into the European kindy scene, there would be an element of entertainment, of course, but this aspect is thankfully avoidable for most of us who don't want to play!
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not really the same thing, Spiral. The kiddies are still learning something through their fun and games. Dancing monkey classes do not seem to involve much, if any, learning at all...
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
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Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, Sash....do you mean they aren't picking up language through osmosis? That simple exposure is insufficient?

Heresy;-)
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scot47



Joined: 10 Jan 2003
Posts: 12098
Location: Ultima Thule

PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The mere presence of a native speaker - preferably blonde and blue-eyed GUARANTEES language acquisition.
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Heretical Ideas in EFL', by Sashadroogie.

An excellent read published in Moscow which provides a robust defence of Celta training, and communicative methodology, and teaching grammar and lexis, as well as learning skills. Debunks trendy myths such as the value of EFL cultural studies and the ability of EFLers who cannot punctuate to teach any foreign language learners critical thinking skills. All underpinned by ideological soundness.

~ Morning Star
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DosEquisX



Joined: 09 Dec 2010
Posts: 341

PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

scot47 wrote:
The mere presence of a native speaker - preferably blonde and blue-eyed GUARANTEES immense profits.


FYP Smile
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But, DosEquis, it doesn't work so often this way in Europe. Where blue-eyed blondes are rampant among the locals Laughing

I wonder why that is??????? Cool
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teacheratlarge



Joined: 17 Nov 2011
Posts: 173
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking back at some comments on this thread, I see one glaring omission early on that didn't seem to be addressed.

Spiral says

It's also often the case that we teach at a relatively higher level across the board. Of course there are many high-level Asian students as well, but the percentage of students at upper-int and advanced levels here is greater.

Wouldn't it depend on the country? Russia rated lower for English proficiency than Japan, so I am not sure how you would find a larger number of higher level speakers there. I think it would really depend on the country. Even in the Czech republic, high level speakers were not exactly jumping out of the woodwork when I visited there a few years back.
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Refresh our memory: from where did these ratings come from again?
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