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Cost of living in Bratislava
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drandreasbrown



Joined: 06 Nov 2008
Posts: 34

PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 10:29 pm    Post subject: Cost of living in Bratislava Reply with quote

I'm considering Bratislava but noticed that, after tax, the monthly salary for a teacher of my experience, living in school accommodation would be just under 500 Euro. From what I have seen this is about half the median income for the city, and even less when one takes into account transport costs. Has anyone lived there and how did you find the cost of living? I'm not expecting to save any money, but I'm not expecting to have to scrimp either.
Thanks in advance.
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Kofola



Joined: 20 Feb 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Slovakia

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say that 500 is average after accommodation costs and taxes are taken off. The 1000 E mean is gross.

Transport is cheap - currently 60 euros for an all zone pass for 3 months. Your employer might pay for it if you're going to be travelling on the job. If you're working full-time you'll be entitled to luncheon vouchers. They should be around 3 euros per working day - but depends on how generous your employer is. You pay 60% of the cost I think. You can use them on food items in shops.

It is expensive generally. Having a coffee or beer out is still cheaper. I usually pay around 1.75 for a coffee. But you can pay a lot more. You can have a beer in the suburbs for 1euro, 1.60 is average for the centre. Clothing, leisure activities very expensive.
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jonniboy



Joined: 18 Jun 2006
Posts: 684
Location: Riga, Latvia

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2010 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crikey, how things change. When I was in Bratislava in Summer 2002 it was 70 cents for a beer in the trendy bars in the centre, 45 in the less trendy bars and 30 cents (!) if you walked a bit outside the centre. I can remember going out with 5 euros equivalent and coming back well oiled with lots of loose change.

How much is it to eat out in a no frills cafe now? How about accommodation?
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Kofola



Joined: 20 Feb 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Slovakia

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Prices were much cheaper then, but wages were much lower too. I think on average it's still just as expensive as it always was. The average Slovak wage in 2002 was around 450 EUR compared with 780 today (gross).

A one-room flat in Bratislava will set you back 300-400 a month on average.

The standard worker's lunch menu is around 3 euros for two courses and a drink (more in the Old Town).

Going out for a pizza and a beer in the evening - prob around 6 Euros.
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BootOfTheBeast



Joined: 13 May 2009
Posts: 45
Location: SE Asia

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 10:16 am    Post subject: Bump Reply with quote

A quick bump, one year on, any great changes?

Cheers,

Boot
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Kofola



Joined: 20 Feb 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Slovakia

PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2012 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

No great changes:

average Slovak salary is 781 euros
average Bratislava salary is 997 euros

flats are still 300-400
cigarettes are 3 euros

the highest luncheon voucher is 3.80 a day if you work more than four hours, think 3.20 is the minimum

teaching jobs are still to be had

inflation was running at about 4% last year, so any increases have been swallowed up

plus they introduced higher taxes on alcohol

Generally speaking, the govt is trying to reduce the budget deficit so local councils are cutting back on spending. Other than that, early elections are due in March and the country is mired in a political scandal 'Gorila' that transcends all parties and goes right to the heart of the political system. Interesting times!
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BootOfTheBeast



Joined: 13 May 2009
Posts: 45
Location: SE Asia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2012 6:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Na zdravie Kofolo.

Good to have up-to-date info from those on the ground.

Boot
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Binary_Star



Joined: 13 Jun 2011
Posts: 22

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2012 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, there's defnitely work to be had in Bratislava? What's the pay like? How many hours does one need to do to live? Is there a lot of demand for native speakers? Any help would be much appreciated.
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Kofola



Joined: 20 Feb 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Slovakia

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Binary Star,

Sorry for the late reply - only just noticed your post.

I'm not looking for work myself but nonetheless a couple of part time jobs popped up in my inbox last week. And I see IH are looking for at least one teacher.

If you're looking, try the usual worldwide suspects, plus in Slovakia, places like these:

Akademia vzdelavania http://www.aveducation.sk/
International House http://ihbratislava.sk/sk/uvod
PLUS Academia http://www.plusacademia.sk/pracovne-prilezitosti

There are many more if you do a search, and depending where you want to go.

a general Slovak recruitment site is http://www.profesia.sk/

Pay varies greatly. In Bratislava I would expect 900 gross if you have experience. I think it's closer to 700 without. Less in the regions.

I would say you need a minimum of 25 teaching hours ie 45mins, but most do 30. And less than this and financially life will be tighter. Although if you do it privately, you could make more. Some things are very expensive here. Petrol has just gone up to 1.50 (same as the UK, but the minimum wages are 1000 GBP (UK) and 350 EUR (SR)). Although how anyone can live off 350 is a bit of a mystery to me - my rent is 250.

There is definitely demand - I'm forever turning work down. I would expect more things to crop up though now that we're out of the post-Christmas blip.

Hope it helps!
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sharter



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 878
Location: All over the place

PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:06 am    Post subject: Teaching in the EU Reply with quote

I haven't been to Bratislava for a while but was in Poznan, Poland last week and Berlin. I have a 13-year-old son in Central Europe, so have seen the general changes, many of which are applicable generally. I found going out cheaper in Berlin than Poznan. Property prices in Berlin are lower than Poznan. How anyone can live in the EU on less than 1,500 Euros beats me. I think you'll scrape by on 1,000 and barely live. I'm in the Middle East thank God.

When I first went to Brat in 1995, a beer was about 10p and 3 of us stayed at the YMCA for a fiver. I remember watching two cops stealing cakes at the coffee shop in the station. I also had a steak which had a sparkler (lit) in it.
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Larryj917



Joined: 25 Nov 2011
Posts: 21

PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 7:41 am    Post subject: Re: Teaching in the EU Reply with quote

sharter wrote:
I haven't been to Bratislava for a while but was in Poznan, Poland last week and Berlin. I have a 13-year-old son in Central Europe, so have seen the general changes, many of which are applicable generally. I found going out cheaper in Berlin than Poznan. Property prices in Berlin are lower than Poznan. How anyone can live in the EU on less than 1,500 Euros beats me. I think you'll scrape by on 1,000 and barely live. I'm in the Middle East thank God.

When I first went to Brat in 1995, a beer was about 10p and 3 of us stayed at the YMCA for a fiver. I remember watching two cops stealing cakes at the coffee shop in the station. I also had a steak which had a sparkler (lit) in it.


The sparkler was probably to draw your attention from the beef. Smile
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sharter



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 878
Location: All over the place

PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 8:13 am    Post subject: lmfao Reply with quote

The beef was ok-it was just the combination of gherkins, mandarins, pineapple and cheese on top of it that kind of ruined it. The sparkler was a nice touch and completely fooled me at first, so it did its job.

I have to say that Czech and Slovak cuisine is appalling. Dumplings and stew, fried cheese, dodgy sausages and hlebicek open sandwiches ad nauseam.

The beer ,however, is in a league of its own. Radegast and Gambrinus were my personal faves.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I have to say that Czech and Slovak cuisine is appalling. Dumplings and stew, fried cheese, dodgy sausages and hlebicek open sandwiches ad nauseam.


Quote:
The beer ,however, is in a league of its own.


Sounds like you limited yourself to pub grub. Waddaya expect? If you come around again, I'll give you a gastronomical tour. There's vastly better food available (and not for tourist prices, either).
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Kofola



Joined: 20 Feb 2009
Posts: 146
Location: Slovakia

PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
There's vastly better food available (and not for tourist prices, either).


I wholeheartedly agree. There is some really nice food to be had in Bratislava, if you know where to go. Admittedly, they're also pretty good at cashing in on the tourists.

@Sharter. Don't forget that if you were eating out here in 1995 then that was still in the years when the service industry was basically still communist. Restaurants were purely functional and Slovaks pretty much never ate out. Why bother when you could eat better at home?

I would say it has taken a good ten, fifteen years for that to really change. The last meal I had out to celebrate a special occasion was excellent. High quality and impeccable service. Very good value.
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sharter



Joined: 25 Jun 2008
Posts: 878
Location: All over the place

PostPosted: Thu Mar 29, 2012 5:50 am    Post subject: ok Reply with quote

Hey guys, it was a long time ago. And yes, I did limit myself to pub food Wink....it was the beer......top notch. When I pass through again I'll pm you and maybe we could hook up for a few 'sherberts' and some of this good food. I worked for Language Link in the Czech Republic back in those days...first ever teaching job and last ever experience with Language Link Smile

There's something about Central Europe that gets its hook in you. However, the wages/cost of living ratio is vastly inferior in 2012. As a dad it's just not an option.
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