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Best options: kids or adults in Warsaw or regions
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dirramu



Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:37 am    Post subject: Best options: kids or adults in Warsaw or regions Reply with quote

I thought I read a post about people discussing teaching kids versus adults but can't seem to find it.

I am in Germany at the moment but would like to move to Poland in the coming months. I have about 10 years ESL experience teaching kids and an MA (App Ling).

I would prefer to move to Warsaw or one of the larger cities and would also like to branch out into adult teaching. What are the options for teaching kids versus adults? What pays the best? I'm also a qualified school teacher, would I be able to work in Polish state schools? Are they as reluctant to recognise foreign trained teachers as the Germans?

What would be my best options?

Also, can anyone recommend regional centres with fewer native speakers?

I've read a couple of the threads on setting up your own business and it seems attractive to me but I think it would be hard after just arriving with no Polish. Perhaps better to just work in a school for the first year and learn a bit of Polish then maybe try to set up my own business?
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ecocks



Joined: 06 Nov 2007
Posts: 890
Location: Gdansk, Poland

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You should really look into a position with an International school. That's where the money and benefits are at. You can always ease into teaching adults in your spare time to see how it works out for you.

Just my opinion.
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 978
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:32 pm    Post subject: International Schools Reply with quote

Yes, look for a job at an international school, like the British School. You'll make loads more money with much better benefits and vacation time as well.

Forget about Polish state schools. They pay peanuts and don't usually hire native speakers.

Even working for a language school, teachers who can teach kids and teens are in much higher demand now.
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dirramu



Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MS,

Where would you say people who teach kids are in demand? In Warsaw or in regional areas?

I have sent my CV off to about 10 international schools but there is a fair chance I won't get a job. All my experience is teaching EAL in Australia and most of the international schools teach IB, or British or American curriculums. Even with my experience it can be hard to break in without experience in any of those curriculum areas.

If I just arrived in Warsaw would I have a fair chance of finding work from September on?
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 978
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dirramu wrote:
MS,

Where would you say people who teach kids are in demand? In Warsaw or in regional areas?

I have sent my CV off to about 10 international schools but there is a fair chance I won't get a job. All my experience is teaching EAL in Australia and most of the international schools teach IB, or British or American curriculums. Even with my experience it can be hard to break in without experience in any of those curriculum areas.

If I just arrived in Warsaw would I have a fair chance of finding work from September on?


Have no fear, you'll easily find work with your quals and exp.

Teachers of children are in high demand in most Polish cities, but particularly so in Warsaw. In Warsaw, higher incomes and parents who are obsessed with giving their children every advantage mean plenty of well-paid work teaching kids.

dirramu, seeing as how you've already applied to many international schools, I'd say coming to Warsaw in June, or even September, would make more sense.

No one hires this early for Sept., with the possible exception of international schools. But you've already got that base covered.
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dirramu



Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks MS.

I'll just have to play things by ear. If I manage to get a job with an int school great - if not maybe I'll take a holiday in August and as you suggest come in September.

cheers
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delphian-domine



Joined: 11 Mar 2011
Posts: 557

PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2013 10:41 pm    Post subject: Re: Best options: kids or adults in Warsaw or regions Reply with quote

dirramu wrote:
I'm also a qualified school teacher, would I be able to work in Polish state schools? Are they as reluctant to recognise foreign trained teachers as the Germans?


They're actually not so bad for this - they tend to demand silly bits of paperwork, but they don't actually have any issues with recognising qualifications obtained abroad. Certainly - they are far less protectionist than the Germans or French!

But the salaries in State schools are very poor for those just starting - but another option to investigate would be working for a "Szkola Niepubliczna". These are publicly funded but private - and they will have the freedom to offer you what they can. Some of them are quite wealthy, too.

Also don't discount private schools in general. International schools are the richest, but there are certainly some Polish-only schools that have a decent amount of cash to spend!
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dirramu



Joined: 28 Oct 2008
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. It's another avenue I can look up.

The protectionism in Germany is particularly galling. The Germans just feel they have the highest possible standards and that nobody could possibly meet theirs. They have only reluctantly made some concessions to other EU states because of EU rules. It doesn't help me much though. I've made a point of mentioning that the TES regularly lists my uni in Australia as in the top 100 in the world. I always feel like asking how many Germany unis are regarded in the top 100 (i.e. none) but.....
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 978
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Feb 08, 2013 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dirramu wrote:
Thanks. It's another avenue I can look up.

The protectionism in Germany is particularly galling. The Germans just feel they have the highest possible standards and that nobody could possibly meet theirs. They have only reluctantly made some concessions to other EU states because of EU rules. It doesn't help me much though. I've made a point of mentioning that the TES regularly lists my uni in Australia as in the top 100 in the world. I always feel like asking how many Germany unis are regarded in the top 100 (i.e. none) but.....
The TES itself probably isn't rigorous enough to meet German standards. Wink
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Infinite



Joined: 05 Jan 2013
Posts: 162

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As soon as you leave Warsaw, or any metro area, you'll find yourself in huge demand. It's simply not true that there's more money and opportunities in big cities.

The benefits of small towns and villages -
a. As a native you can still charge and make as much as you would in metro areas while having lower costs of living, better food and much nicer classroom atmosphere.

b. Small town schools offer blocks unlike cities where you have to commute all day from school to school or company to company.

c. Young adults in small communities are eager to learn, because they all want to study in big cities. Plus matura and extended matura exams in English are the thing to do now, so teens are where the money's coming from most of the time.

d. Young adults in small towns are not as exposed to English as their counterparts in big cities and don't have as many opportunities to experience first hand English speakers, so given the opportunity, they will jump on it.

e. If you're a good teacher, and I can't stress the word TEACHER enough, you'll quickly find yourself with more hours than you can handle.

f. Unfortunately, there's a stigma that follows natives due to the backpackers and the mess they usually leave behind. If you can break through the initial distrust of school owners and prove yourself to be a good sport, you'll quickly gain new students. The word in small towns travels fast, very fast actually.

g. In small towns word travels fast, but so does gossip... if you mess up in your private or professional life, it will haunt you. If you're a good TEACHER, you have nothing to worry about Wink

h. Summer time, schools are closed, so you might want to be thrifty with your money, which is not that difficult when you're outside of city limits.

i. Another, REALLY positive thing about living in small communities - just pick what you like - mountains, lakes, country side or small towns... wherever it might be, you'll be able to afford a nice size pad at a fraction of the city cost.

j. Is it all milk and gravy? Of course not, you have to be realistic and understand that living in the rural areas is not for everyone. It's good to have a city close by if you're looking for some weekend fun.
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Infinite



Joined: 05 Jan 2013
Posts: 162

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:13 am    Post subject: Re: Best options: kids or adults in Warsaw or regions Reply with quote

delphian-domine wrote:
dirramu wrote:
I'm also a qualified school teacher, would I be able to work in Polish state schools? Are they as reluctant to recognise foreign trained teachers as the Germans?


They're actually not so bad for this - they tend to demand silly bits of paperwork, but they don't actually have any issues with recognising qualifications obtained abroad. Certainly - they are far less protectionist than the Germans or French!

But the salaries in State schools are very poor for those just starting - but another option to investigate would be working for a "Szkola Niepubliczna". These are publicly funded but private - and they will have the freedom to offer you what they can. Some of them are quite wealthy, too.

Also don't discount private schools in general. International schools are the richest, but there are certainly some Polish-only schools that have a decent amount of cash to spend!


Very sound advice here.
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ecocks



Joined: 06 Nov 2007
Posts: 890
Location: Gdansk, Poland

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Infinite wrote:
As soon as you leave Warsaw, or any metro area, you'll find yourself in huge demand. It's simply not true that there's more money and opportunities in big cities.

The benefits of small towns and villages -
a. As a native you can still charge and make as much as you would in metro areas while having lower costs of living, better food and much nicer classroom atmosphere.

b. Small town schools offer blocks unlike cities where you have to commute all day from school to school or company to company.

c. Young adults in small communities are eager to learn, because they all want to study in big cities. Plus matura and extended matura exams in English are the thing to do now, so teens are where the money's coming from most of the time.

d. Young adults in small towns are not as exposed to English as their counterparts in big cities and don't have as many opportunities to experience first hand English speakers, so given the opportunity, they will jump on it.

e. If you're a good teacher, and I can't stress the word TEACHER enough, you'll quickly find yourself with more hours than you can handle.

f. Unfortunately, there's a stigma that follows natives due to the backpackers and the mess they usually leave behind. If you can break through the initial distrust of school owners and prove yourself to be a good sport, you'll quickly gain new students. The word in small towns travels fast, very fast actually.

g. In small towns word travels fast, but so does gossip... if you mess up in your private or professional life, it will haunt you. If you're a good TEACHER, you have nothing to worry about Wink

h. Summer time, schools are closed, so you might want to be thrifty with your money, which is not that difficult when you're outside of city limits.

i. Another, REALLY positive thing about living in small communities - just pick what you like - mountains, lakes, country side or small towns... wherever it might be, you'll be able to afford a nice size pad at a fraction of the city cost.

j. Is it all milk and gravy? Of course not, you have to be realistic and understand that living in the rural areas is not for everyone. It's good to have a city close by if you're looking for some weekend fun.


Good points.

The overall thing though is to be yourself. If you cannot live outside a city then for God's sake stay in one of them. Just quit yer bichin' about costs, distant people, pollution and the hustle and bustle. If you like the countryside then don't complain about no clubs, hop on a bus and head into the nearest town for the weekends. Poland has plenty of variety and there seems to be something for almost everyone.

Places are what you make of them. As the above outlines, I wanted the sea, middle-sized city, history everywhere, some university students mixed with some business types along with decent transport and shopping opportunities. You can find what you want if you'll just be honest about your needs, wants and abilities.
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Master Shake



Joined: 03 Nov 2006
Posts: 978
Location: Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Infinite wrote:
The benefits of small towns and villages -
a. As a native you can still charge and make as much as you would in metro areas while having lower costs of living, better food and much nicer classroom atmosphere.
Do you have some specific examples to back this up? I don't buy it.

Warsaw is more expensive than other Polish towns, but the amount you can make here more than makes up for the cost of living.

Show me some figures, Infinite. Can you name a school outside Warsaw that pays over 100zl/hour net or gross? I can name a few here in the Big Potato.

Infinite wrote:
b. Small town schools offer blocks unlike cities where you have to commute all day from school to school or company to company.
Now where did you get this idea? I only teach blocks and when I get and offer to take on a 1 hour class in BFE the answer is invariably 'no, thanks'.

Most of the rest of your points can be true, sometimes. There are benefits to living in a smaller town. But I had to read these first two points twice because this is simply not what I've seen in PL at all, and I've been here a while.
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sparks



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 522

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Can you name a school outside Warsaw that pays over 100zl/hour net or gross? I can name a few here in the Big Potato.


Do it. Besides the BC I don't know of any and I've been here a good long while. Privates, sure, but a regular old language school? Even Archibald. Maybe I'm just a poor negotiator.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9652
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The protectionism in Germany is particularly galling. The Germans just feel they have the highest possible standards and that nobody could possibly meet theirs. They have only reluctantly made some concessions to other EU states because of EU rules. It doesn't help me much though. I've made a point of mentioning that the TES regularly lists my uni in Australia as in the top 100 in the world. I always feel like asking how many Germany unis are regarded in the top 100 (i.e. none) but.....

By the way (this isn't particularly useful, I mean) I recall the year (about five years back) that the stats demonstrated that the Czech Rep officially ranked higher than German educationally. Our German friends were not happy to be behind the 'easterners'!
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