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Teach Mauritania
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water rat



Joined: 30 Aug 2014
Posts: 1083
Location: Ningbo

PostPosted: Sun Sep 14, 2014 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Capt Lugwash wrote:
Young Guns II


Well done, Cap'n El. Looked up the exact quote on IMDB.com
Quote:
[Upon discovering a new boom town is mining guano]

Arkansas Dave Rudabaugh: I've been to gold towns, silver towns, I've even been to turquoise towns. But I have never been to a bat shit town. Can't wait to see the women!


It's been almost 25 years, so forgive me if I didn't get it quite right.
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lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2014 6:40 am    Post subject: Right... Reply with quote

Eagle Eyes wrote:
There are some French run international schools that hire ESL teachers in Mauritania..the pay is around $2,000/Month plus some benefits. Good luck in your search! Smile


In Ecuador I taught at elite private school and got 450/month plus my visa paid for..with no airfare or housing assistance. Ecuador is actually not in a recession, so the country is not really that poor right now. Although I admit in many of the poorest countries 1-5% of the population is wealthy and well educated, any job in a country this poor offering 2000 US dollars a month plus other benefits is 100% certain to be a scam!
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EFL Educator



Joined: 17 Jul 2013
Posts: 935
Location: Cape Town

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2014 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree it most likely would be a scam...for Latin America (not Africa) that is as they pay the lowest EFL teaching wages in the world! Shocked Shocked Shocked
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lagringalindissima



Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Posts: 105
Location: Tucson, Arizona

PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2014 7:14 am    Post subject: I have no experience in Africa, but.. Reply with quote

2,000 a month or 24,000 a year to teach in one of the poorest countries on earth still sounds like to high a salary to me. Maybe I am wrong, but I'd be wary of a job offering that much... but maybe they have to pay that much to get anyone to come?
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EFL Educator



Joined: 17 Jul 2013
Posts: 935
Location: Cape Town

PostPosted: Thu Oct 23, 2014 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes .Mauritania is a hardship posting...that is why they offer a good TEFL salary to attract candidates. The Sahara Desert with its endless sand dunes covers most of the north and east of the country and roads are extremely difficult to drive in...especially during sandstorms. If you llke sand this is a great place to live in...sand everywhere...and more sand! Mauritania is not Morocco!!!! Shocked Shocked
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nomad soul



Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 10950
Location: The real world

PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 4:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's certainly a hardship...

In Mauritania, a Black Market in Books Plagues Education
By Rajel Oumar Hell Beilil, Al Fanar Media | 17 February 2015
Source: http://www.al-fanarmedia.org/2015/02/mauritania-black-market-books-plagues-education/

NOUAKCHOTT, MAURITANIA—At a book market in Mauritania’s capital recently, a prominent author, Al-Mubarak Weld Al-Khal was looking for some of the more than 20 textbooks he has written. It might have seemed like a simple task. But in a nation where textbooks are increasingly hard to find, it was tedious and difficult.

Since last year, books in Mauritania have, for reasons that are not always clear, been steered from legal distributors into the black market, and they have become difficult to find and overpriced. “The prices of school books are unbelievable, and so is the fluctuation of prices in the black market these days,” said Al-Khal, who is also a former director of the Primary Education Department in Mauritania’s Ministry of Education. He attended the book market recently to buy books for his grandson.

Scarcity of primary, middle and secondary reading-level books are a hot topic in Mauritania, where many parents—and even grandparents—are struggling to find the educational materials their children need. Among them is Maryam Ment Ahmeida, whose children have difficulty studying due to lack of book availability. She can’t even find an Arabic language textbook, which a teacher had recommended she buy, on the black market.

When books are available, they are often expensive. The price of a single book can be as much as around 3,000 Mauritanian Ouguiya, the local currency, or $10.32—much more than previous rates that typically would not exceed 100 Ouguiya ($.34) at small kiosks where books used to be sold. This kiosks closed 15 years ago based on recommendations by the World Bank that aimed to reform education and prevent fake books from hitting the market.

Aldada Weld El-Salem, who is in his thirties, said he was lucky to find six schoolbooks for his daughter for a total of 20,000 Ouguiya ($68.81) on the black market. “I did not want to risk the future of my daughter so I recently gave in to the prices of the dealers and I paid whatever they asked for,” he said. “I did not want my daughter to be a victim of the indifference of the official authorities toward a current crisis afflicting all of Mauritania’s schools.”

While the reasons for the problem were unclear, Al-Khal said book shortages and black market prices—combined with rife book theft and smuggling—are symptoms of broader corruption in Mauritania’s education system. Al-Khal is specifically concerned about what the high cost of books means for the nation’s poor. Other parents have complained to Ministry of Education officials about the challenges the crisis creates for their children’s futures.

But shortages and costs don’t effect children alone: Arabic teacher Ahmed Salem said he has been unable to find a copy of a teacher’s guide—helping him understand why children come to school without books. One student, Azza Ment Abah, who attends a school in Nouakchott, said some of her classmates were expelled from the school because they could not buy books. A parent, Al-Salek Weld Moatalan, said he was annoyed when another teacher in the city sent his children home because they lacked the learning materials they needed.

Officials vow they are working to combat the problem. Sidi Mohammad Weld Kaber, the director of the National Educational Institute, a public organization in charge of the printing and nationwide distribution of school books, acknowledged difficulty people face finding books. He also said a law should be passed criminalizing the theft of schoolbooks and black market sales, and that he needed time to investigate the problem. Providing children with the books that they need as soon as possible is on top of his team’s agenda, Weld said. He is also considering of re-opening schoolbook kiosks.

Additionally, the National Educational Institute recently started investigations into the textbook shortage and the illegal sale of books. Earlier this year, security officials announced that attempts were made to arrest a network of textbook smugglers following the theft of 3,000 books from a secondary school in Mauritania’s capital. A similar robbery had also occurred in a primary school in the same area. To get around the problem, one primary school student, Ahmed Walad Mohammad said he photocopies pages of books he needs. “Since we go to a private school, we are allowed to photocopy our lessons,” Mohammad.

(End of article)
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fat_chris



Joined: 10 Sep 2003
Posts: 3198
Location: Beijing

PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 5:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Qaaolchoura wrote:
I'm planning on attempting to make the transition (soon as my Turkish is good enough to get the language bonus) and know other Americans who are thinking the same. I expect EFL time in foreign countries, particularly in "hardship postings" (which includes places like Turkey, Greece, and Mexico) is a plus in the experience column.


Qaaolchoura,

Did you end up applying for a Department of State position?

Warm regards,
fat_chris
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bulgogiboy



Joined: 23 Feb 2005
Posts: 796

PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2017 7:01 pm    Post subject: Re: Teach Mauritania Reply with quote

Susie wrote:
I hear that the country is a great place in which to work, that the cost of living is low, that the salaries are high for qualified and experienced western teachers, that the food is nurishing, the people friendly and the weather great.

I just can't find any jobs offered there on this forum. Does anyone have a lead?


I worked there and found it to be pretty much the opposite of everything you've just said, with the exception of friendly people. It's a horrible place to work, cost of living is surprisingly high, salaries are 'high' but not nearly high enough for the hardship suffered, the food is disgusting and hygiene standards are very poor, the weather is stiflingly hot and dusty (Its the Sahara, after all).
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