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Opportunities outside Mexico City? (Guadalajara? Mazatlan?)

 
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drewteacher



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 4:23 am    Post subject: Opportunities outside Mexico City? (Guadalajara? Mazatlan?) Reply with quote

From what I've read here, there are lots of opportunities for a new arrival to find teaching work in Mexico City, but I'm wondering about other areas, such as Guadalajara, or Mazatlan. Are the prospects good for a teacher with a Bachelor's degree, CELTA certificate and years of experience to just show up and start looking for work? Thanks!
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Samantha



Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 2032
Location: Mexican Riviera

PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guadalajara is the second largest city in Mexico, so plenty of opportunities there. Mazatlan is a small ciity on the beach, so has very few opportunities, by comparison. You will find that in most beach resorts, worthwhile jobs are snapped up by those permanently established there. In Mazatlan, the trend is to hire Mexican teachers for English classes. Most foreign teachers can't tolerate the hot, humid climate for 6 or 7 months of the year and they vanish with no notice. Also, in a resort area, the tendency for newcomers is to live like a tourist, which is way out of a teacher's salary range. It doesn't take long to wipe out a healthy savings account.

I recommend working inland where the pay is better, the jobs are more plentiful, and travelling to the beach on the many holidays that happen in Mexico. Buses are nice, service is good, and it's a great way to get around the country fairly inexpensively. If you like Mazatlan, the pay is good in Culiacan, the State capital, and it's just 2 1/2 hours to the north. (Culichis love Mazatlan. They come for conventions, meetings or to stay in their ocean front time shares!)

I'm not sure when you are coming, but keep your eye on the new Immigration laws as they unfold in the next month or so. Forewarned is forearmed. Smile
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drewteacher



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info, and yes, I'll keep an eye out here for the new immigration rules. Any clues about what may be changing?
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notamiss



Joined: 20 Jun 2007
Posts: 866
Location: El 5o pino del DF

PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, just have a look at this thread http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=98491 in this same forum.
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drewteacher



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. Yes, I saw that thread. Unfortunately, the documents they link to are in Spanish.
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Samantha



Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 2032
Location: Mexican Riviera

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe this will help a little. He also provides a couple of other links in English.

http://www.sanfelipelife.com/post/Mexico-s-New-Migration-Law
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drewteacher



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very helpful. Thanks. From this, sounds like not a lot of change as far as coming from the U.S., landing a job, then getting a work permit.
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Tretyakovskii



Joined: 14 Aug 2009
Posts: 439
Location: Cancun, Mexico

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 2:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
From this, sounds like not a lot of change as far as coming from the U.S., landing a job, then getting a work permit.

I didn't actually see, anywhere in this article, comments on the restrictions placed on status change within the country (chiefly, Art 53 of the new law, as elaborated in Art 141 of the regulations). The question arises if you enter the country without a visa.

The author may not have recognized the issue raised by these two provisions, and their possible impact on the situation you described.

Google Translate might allow you to read those two Articles from the law and regulations.

The apparent limitations placed on status change did not appear in the old law, and status change was more or less freely permitted.
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Samantha



Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 2032
Location: Mexican Riviera

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

T wrote:
Quote:
The apparent limitations placed on status change did not appear in the old law, and status change was more or less freely permitted.


I don't know where (or even if) it appeared, but there were restrictions placed on status changes for some visa categories. As in, they couldn't be changed.

drewteacher: where in Mexico are you planning to land, and when?
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MotherF



Joined: 07 Jun 2010
Posts: 1143
Location: 17°48'N 97°46'W

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Samantha wrote:
T wrote:
Quote:
The apparent limitations placed on status change did not appear in the old law, and status change was more or less freely permitted.

I don't know where (or even if) it appeared, but there were restrictions placed on status changes for some visa categories. As in, they couldn't be changed.


There were also restrictions on what nationalities could change status. Russians, for example, could not arrive as tourists and change their status. And people from Turkey had to have a visa issued in their home countries even to be tourists--the could not be in the US and then decide to visit Mexico.

I'm sure there were others but those were two I had first hand experience with.
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drewteacher



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Samantha, I had originally planned on arriving in Mexico City from the U.S. after the first of the year, but I am open to other cities in Mexico that may be less crowded and polluted, yet still offer plentiful work opportunities for someone like me with a CELTA Certificate, Bachelors degree, and years of teaching experience. That was the reason for this post originally. I'd welcome suggestions if you have any. Thanks.
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Tretyakovskii



Joined: 14 Aug 2009
Posts: 439
Location: Cancun, Mexico

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MotherF, did you find my comments about your issue, that of the indefinite duration contract?

Quote:
I'm sure there were others but those were two I had first hand experience with.

And, Art 53 of the new law, and 141 of the new regulations, appear to further restrict the situations in which you can ask for a change of status, in country.

My comment, about change of status under the existing law was not intended to be as broad as it came out: I had in mind a more limited range, one that came closer to being of concern to those coming to Mexico to teach English- that of those who could enter, as tourists, visa free, and then change status once they had a job offer- which is common place under the present law.

In four to six weeks all will be clear on this point; but, for now, my opinion, based on my reading of this law, is that one will be able to apply for a residence visa, giving permission to work as an English teacher, after entering the country visa free, provided they declare that intent at the border, and it is so noted on the FMM. My understanding is based on this section of the new regulations:
Quote:
La autoridad migratoria, en el filtro de revisión migratoria, expedirá un documento migratorio alas personas extranjeras que cumplan con los requisitos de internación, de acuerdo con el tipo de visa que seles haya autorizado o que corresponda en casos de supresión de visa.

Until we see what they will do, and some have tested this interpretation, we won't know how INM is planning to handle this issue, beyond what the law I've quoted above has to say about it.

Those who read the section I've quoted can reach their own conclusions about its significance.


Last edited by Tretyakovskii on Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:19 am; edited 3 times in total
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drewteacher



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 62

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
one that came closer to being of concern to those coming to Mexico to teach English


So now I'm confused. Does the new law make it more difficult to come to Mexico as a tourist, with no visa, get a job teaching English, and then get a work visa while in the country?
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Tretyakovskii



Joined: 14 Aug 2009
Posts: 439
Location: Cancun, Mexico

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

(In reading the following comments, please keep in mind it is nothing more than an opinion, informed by a careful reading of the new law and regulations, nothing more.)

I think what we can say about it is that there is reasonable uncertainty about how this will be handled for those who enter after 9 November. What you are reading is my understanding of what this law says.

Under the current law, it wasn't necessary to declare your intent. Under the new law it appears to me that, if you don't, you will be classified "Visitante," in one of the several categories, and unable to apply for a change of status, afterwards.

On the FMM there are little boxes for the INM official to indicate whether you're entering with a visa for an FM2 or FM3, among other things. The new law speaks of the agent noting, in the case of visa free entry, the intent of the person entering the country.

If it were me who was entering with the plan to teach English, I'd be carrying all my documentation establishing my credentials, and declare it was my intent to seek a teaching position in the D.F., for example, and once I had an offer, to apply, in country, for an FM3 (everyone is still using this terminology, in practice).

Here's the important point, it seems to me: once the official ticks the box for an FM3, you will have just 30 days in which to find a job and get an application for FM3 submitted, or leave the country. Enter as a Visitante, and be given 180 days, you cannot then change status, as the new law reads.
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