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Countries that offer the highest salaries - top 3?
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mcloo7



Joined: 18 Aug 2009
Posts: 410
Location: Hangzhou

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tttompatz wrote:
It is a BIG thing to factor in....

I earn $40k per year in Thailand on a single salary and it certainly allows a very comfortable lifestyle (3 bedroom/2 bath house all the mod cons, all the necessary creature comforts, long vacations (200 instructional days per year), domestic and international travel AND still allows for savings in excess of US$20k per year.

You won't find many teachers in the States who can say the same.

As to buying property... we own a house on Vancouver Island in Canada and 5 hectares of land with a 4 bedroom house (custom built) in the Philippines.

I also have a pension that I will qualify for in my later years.

Teaching may not be the most lucrative profession but it does allow a decent standard of living, the possibility to own property and provide for your future. It is firmly planted in what was once called the "middle class".

.


If you don't mind me asking, what type of ESLing job do you have? And, what quals did that require?
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 2:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mcloo7 wrote:
If you don't mind me asking, what type of ESLing job do you have? And, what quals did that require?


VP of a bilingual school (directly responsible for the bilingual program) with about 2000 students this academic year.

I hold 2 masters, 3 undergrad degrees and an ABD (unrelated).
I have 16 years of practical experience, I am published, often present at regional (international) workshops and conferences and I am a contributing author to a couple of TESOL journals and have a non-related column in the KOTESOL journal in Korea.

When I applied as a teacher at my school I only required an undergrad, experience and a good interview. Promotion to my current position was based on (on-the-job) merit, performance and results.

There are better paying jobs out there (I turn down several offers each year) but I'm not all that interested in the noise and pollution of a mega-city so I took the lower salary and better surroundings about 2 hours away from the bright lights.

.
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rayman



Joined: 24 May 2003
Posts: 423

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
rayman wrote:
With a PGCE, there's about 100 countries where you can earn a salary package of US$70 000+ per year. It's more about the school you choose, rather than the country itself. There's currently a blog discussion here on this topic:

http://internationalschoolsreviewdiscuss.wordpress.com/2012/08/02/schools-w-high-savings-potential/



Quote:
International school teaching can be very highly paid, but there are definitely not 100 countries where you can earn 70k+ per year.



Browsing the Search Associates database, so far I've found 66 countries with schools offering a $70 000 package or better. Admittedly, it's not over 100, but keeping in mind a package includes housing, flights, retirement, medical, schooling for dependents etc. which in many schools can total over $50 000 on their own. Then there's salary on top of that.

The list of countries is as follows. If you'd like to know which schools are best to go for in that country, I can try to help. Personally, I find China a good balance between earning decent coin and experiencing a low cost of living. I work with teachers who have climbed the salary scale purely through longevity and saving around $50 000/year. When you get schools that throw in transport (taxi) allowances and pay for utilities on top of everything else, there's really only food and luxury goods to pay for with your remaining money. Base yourself in a relatively uninteresting city and it's almost impossible not to save good money.


Angola
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Azerbaijan
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Belgium
Brazil
Brunei
Cambodia
Canada
China
Christmas Island
Denmark
Egypt
Fiji
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Greenland
Hong Kong
Hungary
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Iraq
Ireland
Japan
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Kuwait
Laos
Lebanon
Macau
Malawi
Malaysia
Monaco
Mongolia
Myanmar51
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nigeria
Norfolk Island
Norway
Oman
Pakistan
Philippines
Poland
Qatar
Russia
Saudi Arabia
Singapore
South Korea
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Switzerland
Taiwan
Thailand
Turkey
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom
United States
Venezuela
Vietnam
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8929
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard really, really good things about Switzerland via a link you posted to ISR. Have you heard of ISCR? Seems like they have a list of itnernational schools around the globe. For a fee of course.
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rayman



Joined: 24 May 2003
Posts: 423

PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Naturegirl, I haven't previously heard of ISCR and a quick google search could only get me to the Indian Society for Clinical Research. My personal experience is with Search Associates who have a large database of international schools which includes all salary/package and hiring information. It's not so easy to sign up with them though as the application process is quite involved and also requires a $225 fee. Other similar, yet smaller agencies include ISS and TRI.
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mcloo7



Joined: 18 Aug 2009
Posts: 410
Location: Hangzhou

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tttompatz wrote:

VP of a bilingual school (directly responsible for the bilingual program) with about 2000 students this academic year.

I hold 2 masters, 3 undergrad degrees and an ABD (unrelated).
I have 16 years of practical experience, I am published, often present at regional (international) workshops and conferences and I am a contributing author to a couple of TESOL journals and have a non-related column in the KOTESOL journal in Korea.

When I applied as a teacher at my school I only required an undergrad, experience and a good interview. Promotion to my current position was based on (on-the-job) merit, performance and results.

There are better paying jobs out there (I turn down several offers each year) but I'm not all that interested in the noise and pollution of a mega-city so I took the lower salary and better surroundings about 2 hours away from the bright lights.

.


Oh, impressive.
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8929
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Thu Aug 30, 2012 1:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, it's ISC Research
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Perilla



Joined: 09 Jul 2010
Posts: 783
Location: Hong Kong

PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tttompatz wrote:
I hold 2 masters, 3 undergrad degrees and an ABD (unrelated).


Holding multiple masters is common enough, but you're the first person I've heard of having 3 undergrad degrees. I wonder how that came about? And how long did it take? (Not 12 years I'm sure!) Just curious ...
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perilla wrote:
tttompatz wrote:
I hold 2 masters, 3 undergrad degrees and an ABD (unrelated).


Holding multiple masters is common enough, but you're the first person I've heard of having 3 undergrad degrees. I wonder how that came about? And how long did it take? (Not 12 years I'm sure!) Just curious ...


They are all unrelated (B.Sc. computer science, BA economics and B.Com business management). 4 years for the 1st, 2 years each for the other 2. The MBA took 2 years (3 semesters + internship) to complete.

They were all done on-campus (distance/internet learning wasn't an option back then). The MA in ELT/TESOL was a blended program and required me to do a lot of pre-reqs that I didn't have because I didn't have a B.Ed/PGCE.

Each one was done at a time when it seemed advantageous to me at the time and in the direction my career was going (or changing as the case may have been).

.
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Solar Strength



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 560
Location: Bangkok, Thailand

PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2012 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Japan.

The foreign TEFL'ers who are lucky and qualified enough to have tenured university positions in Japan earn much more than any other TEFL teach in the UAE or Korea. Salaries also include 5 months summer and winter bonuses and generous annual research allowances. Salaries in the range of US $110, 000 ~ $150, 000 are the norm. I personally know such people who are "stuck" in Japan because they can't justify returning to the U.S. and taking a huge hit in salary.

Korea.

A great place for unqualified and inexperienced TEFL'ers to go and earn a decent salary with university conditions. I don't know of any other TEFL destination where so many under-educated and unqualified EFL teachers from Canada and the U.S., etc., can find university work conditions.

Unqualified and inexperienced - head off to Korea. Have experience and higher degrees with some publications and Japanese language proficiency - throw the dice and try and land yourself one of the coveted permanent Japanese university positions.

The Middle East positions fall somewhere in the middle between the top university jobs in Japan and Korea.


Last edited by Solar Strength on Sat Sep 01, 2012 11:25 am; edited 1 time in total
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naturegirl321



Joined: 04 May 2003
Posts: 8929
Location: home sweet home

PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are two other peopel I know of with 3 BAs, all unrelated. No idea why they did that. The first person said it took her 7 years. Stuff transferred, like gen ed credit.
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Hadit



Joined: 17 Sep 2009
Posts: 109

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2012 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Matt_22 wrote:
The biggest drawback by far is lack of access to tax-advantaged retirement accounts, teacher pensions, social security, and medicare.


What you should do is start a LLC partnership with a family member, say investing in the market, although you'd have to get into some Forex robots because to make it legitly trader status, you may have to prove you've been trading each day. You would pay social security and medicare on this earned income, and you can open up a solo 401k with it as well. This would work with any income generating business you can think of. It should even work with private teaching, rather like a consultant, and you could form a single LLC doing this. Forming it in Wyoming is probably the best.

http://www.irafinancialgroup.com/wp/how-much-can-i-put-away-for-my-retirement-with-a-solo-401k/
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7969



Joined: 26 Mar 2003
Posts: 5682
Location: South China, by the sea.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2012 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

naturegirl321 wrote:
There are two other peopel I know of with 3 BAs, all unrelated. No idea why they did that. The first person said it took her 7 years. Stuff transferred, like gen ed credit.

I think some people (not pointing the finger at anyone here) just like being in school and loathe the thought of entering the real world. One of my neighbours back home had a brother who was working on his PhD in Economics (no idea how many degrees he has). The guy was 39 and had never worked a day (outside of school) in his entire life . . . his wife supported him for 15 years while he spent his adult years in classrooms and doing research.
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And some people manage to get 30 years in the workforce and still accumulate "wallpaper" while doing it.

Work and continued education / professional development are not mutually exclusive and a large number of working professionals that I have met over the years have accumulated multiple degrees without being "professional students" although there have been a few of those too.

.
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7969



Joined: 26 Mar 2003
Posts: 5682
Location: South China, by the sea.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tttompatz wrote:
And some people manage to get 30 years in the workforce and still accumulate "wallpaper" while doing it.

That's true. I have two BAs myself, and both are unrelated but I transferred some credit from the first to help get the second. I needed the second one in order to qualify for a job I was applying for, but once the dept. downsized the job disappeared. I finished the degree anyway, and did that one while working full time I might add (not 30 years worth though), on-campus but working shifts at Defence headquarters in Ottawa. The person I alluded to above was indeed a professional student (that term slipped my mind till you reminded me), something that irked his family to no end.
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