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Caribbean girl in Turkey
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 6:06 pm    Post subject: Caribbean girl in Turkey Reply with quote

Hi

I've been in Turkey since February, so far so good ... I just landed an ESL job here & it will start in September. I'll be based in Hatay, not the most fun place but it's ok for me Smile

nice to meet you all Cool
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Qaaolchoura



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 539
Location: 21 miles from the Syrian border

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you say "Hatay" do you mean Antioch, Iskenderun, or one of the boonie towns? Have you been there?

Antioch is actually a rather charming little town in the center, though the fringes are kind of dirty, it gets hot in the summer and there's no dolmuses (meaning you have to take a cab from the bus station). It was one of the most important cities on earth and it's got a lot of history, even if it doesn't really look it now.

Iskenderun is where Steven Spielberg, in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade pretended is the actual location of Petra. It's nowhere near that remarkable. It's like a smaller version of Mersin (but like Antioch it's hot and has no dolmuses), but it's got water which a lot of people like. Personally I'd work in Antioch if I had a decent job offer, but I wouldn't work in Iskenderun or the rest of Hatay unless it was a great offer. (I'm not a beach person, and if you are you may love the sun and sand of Iskenderun.)

Any rate, memnun oldum and good luck.

Regards,
~Q
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2012 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

not sure if it's the same city or not but where I'll be is Hatay, Antakya
I visited for 2 days just to see the school & meet with the administration. So I didn't get to see much. I noticed it's multi cultural lots of arabs, turks, jews, syrians, iranians around & there were alot of archaic victorian architecture around where I stayed. Quiet place.
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Qaaolchoura



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 539
Location: 21 miles from the Syrian border

PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, Antakya = Antioch.

By and large I use the Turkish names for places, but I call Antakya Antioch (and so does Google. If you search for weather in Turkish downs you'll notice it's the only one they use the English name for), since Antioch was once more important than Jerusalem and Baghdad, while Antakya is an insignificant Turkish provincial capital.

~Q
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Eagle Eyes



Joined: 26 Apr 2012
Posts: 121
Location: Istanbul

PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hatay is a great place to work in Turkey and you can definitely save money gthere. One think to note is that it is a very conservative and "arab" looking place. The beaches are nice and the food is great...especially the kebab! Good luck in Hatay! Smile
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Qaaolchoura for that Smile

I'm looking forward to it Eagle Eyes. Although when I was there for my 2 day visit, a few of the teachers I met were in mini skits & I saw lots in people in shorts & sleeveless tops, etc on the streets. Maybe it was due to the 38 degree temperature. I think they aren't too conservative with the dressing maybe it's the mindset. I'll keep you posted on my adventures Cool
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billy orr



Joined: 15 Jul 2009
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say hatay is cosmopolitan and progressive, not conservative. Not as progressive as the areas on the Aegean coats like Muğla or İzmir, but nowehere not at all conservative in the way Hatay's near neighbours like Adana or Osmaniye or Kahramanmaraş or Urfa.
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Qaaolchoura



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 539
Location: 21 miles from the Syrian border

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

billy orr wrote:
I would say hatay is cosmopolitan and progressive, not conservative. Not as progressive as the areas on the Aegean coats like Muğla or İzmir, but nowehere not at all conservative in the way Hatay's near neighbours like Adana or Osmaniye or Kahramanmaraş or Urfa.

Adana? Conservative? Surely you jest!?
Apart from Izmir it's the most Westernized place I've seen in Turkey. And it's the only place I've been here where the mosques aren't disruptive. Can't even say that about Izmir.

~Q
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guys I think only the villages are conservative. But no one bothers you if you're not. I know girls that cover from head to toe but wear swimsuits to the beach here. It's an interesting balance.

How's your teaching experience overall thus far?? ... in terms of ethics, the kids, the turkish staff, salary, etc etc

This is my first classroom job here in turkey Mr. Green Anything I should know about turkish kids? or are they much the same internationally?
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9786
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yoghurt comes from the Turkish word to thicken, yoğmak I believe.

Samuel Beckett's quote springs to mind about the cream of his university: rich and thick.

Many teachers I know in Turkey have uttered this phrase after teaching the kiddies. Perhaps uncharitably...
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh my lol

teaching kids always tends to be a challenge as you get all different personalities & assorted gremlins Mr. Green but I seem to do quite well with them for some reason.

Thanks for your input Sashadroogie & nice to meet you Cool
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9786
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to meet you too, Yogita. Hope everything goes well for you. If you can do well with the kiddies in Turkey, then nothing will stand in your way to ... world domination!!!

Seriously, all the best to you.
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

^ oh my, what does that mean?? I guess I'll know in time lol

I've taught a few kids one-to-one and the most difficult situation was the smelly little boys .... I would play esl games with them & give rewards at the end sometimes. I would give them deodorant & tell them the girls would like it too. It worked, no more smelly little boys lol
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9786
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kids one-to-one? Is that all? Sorry. I don't mean to scare you, but if you have never had a class/group of kiddies, then be aware that they are different beasts in numbers. Especially the Turkish variety.

All kiddies are smelly. That will be the least of it.

However, I am genuine in my admiration of those who can handle the little blighters. I salute you, and wish you the very best. I sincerely hope you'll be posting back here about how wonderful the teaching experience has been.

Hic!
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Yogita



Joined: 17 Jun 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks you Sashadroogie I'll keep you posted Smile
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