Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Hummus and Veganism in Turkey

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Turkey
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Janiny



Joined: 31 May 2008
Posts: 142

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 5:36 am    Post subject: Hummus and Veganism in Turkey Reply with quote

I would appreciate any information or advice on this topic: How is Turkish hummus? And how easy or difficult is it to be vegan in Turkey?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9016
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Know nothing about hummus, but I'll take a stab at answering at answering your other question. Quite hard/next to impossible - even in bigger cities. At least that is what my vegetarian and vegan colleagues said ten odd years ago. I could be wrong, but as Turkish cuisine was never much for this, so I'd be surprised if anything has changed in the interim. Posters who are on the ground now will have more solid info though...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ossie39



Joined: 18 Jan 2009
Posts: 99

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:03 am    Post subject: vegetarianism Reply with quote

I am not an expert on this but I think it is hard to be a vegetarian let alone a vegan. What do I like? I love lentil soup (mercamek) and I love tulum (a tasty cheese), asure (a cold pudding with beans and just about any fruit). You may not know that a pide is a Turkish pizza and it is boat shape and not round, I like it with egg and tomatoes, yamutlar. Mezes are small portions on small plates and could include humus, goat cheese, pickled beetroot, sun dried tomatoes, ezme (this is spicey tomatoes and chopped onions) that you put on bread. You choose what you want. Mushroom or tomato soup is likely to around. Butterbeans and rice is very nice. There is patlican - that is aubergine, I know it can be served as a kebab but I don't know what else you can do with it. Turks also make dishes with pumpkins. I think it is hard but I think I have shown it is not impossible.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ossie39



Joined: 18 Jan 2009
Posts: 99

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:05 am    Post subject: vegetarianism Reply with quote

I am not an expert on this but I think it is hard to be a vegetarian let alone a vegan. What do I like? I love lentil soup (mercamek) and I love tulum (a tasty cheese), asure (a cold pudding with beans and just about any fruit). You may not know that a pide is a Turkish pizza and it is boat shape and not round, I like it with egg and tomatoes, yamutlar. Mezes are small portions on small plates and could include humus, goat cheese, pickled beetroot, sun dried tomatoes, ezme (this is spicey tomatoes and chopped onions) that you put on bread. You choose what you want. Mushroom or tomato soup is likely to around. Butterbeans and rice is very nice. There is patlican - that is aubergine, I know it can be served as a kebab but I don't know what else you can do with it. Turks also make dishes with pumpkins. I think it is hard but I think I have shown it is not impossible.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gursky



Joined: 01 Nov 2011
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a close friend who is a vegan and he thinks Turkey is a great place for it as long as you're ready to cook for yourself. People eat meat and dairy products a lot in Turkey but there is also a huge variety of “Zeytinyaglilar”. These are dishes made from vegetables and only with olive oil.
Saying that, in Turkey people don't know much about veganism so don't risk it. Even if you get told that the product doesn't have milk etc. in it, don't believe it, things like ice-cream, cakes etc. always have milk/milk powder in them.
I would say it's doable but won't be the easiest thing!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BrotherJimma



Joined: 31 May 2012
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with the other posters here that a vegetarian lifestyle is very challenging, and veganism would be impractical. I met only one foreigner who was vegetarian during my five years in Istanbul, and Turks met this information with great surprise and something akin to pity. He said he was often treated like someone with a medical condition or a mental illness. Vegetarianism is just not a concept that Turks can wrap their heads around. However, if you are invited to eat in the homes of locals, you will find that the food is far less meat-based than what is available in the restaurants. You should also look for gozleme, a delicious pancake filled with cheese, potato, or spinach. Good luck!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Eagle Eyes



Joined: 26 Apr 2012
Posts: 121
Location: Istanbul

PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Being a Vegan in Turkey isn't a problem if you can cook your own food at home. The problem is most Turkish restaurants are meat based in their food and cuisine so one has to tread carefuly here if you wish to remain a vegan. Enjoy Turkish food! Smile !
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gorkomi



Joined: 24 Aug 2009
Posts: 133

PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you found a vegan restaurant?

Make stuff at home using vegetables and grains.

You can make a nice BLT sandwish on sourdough bread. To make the "bacon" use raw coconut chips, coated in organic maple syrup and a dash of cayenne pepper, bake lightly. Add slices of tomato, romaine, and avocado. It's really nice for a light lunch.

Serve with sunflower sprouts in a bit of vinegriette (or however you spell it.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tarte tatin



Joined: 02 Mar 2007
Posts: 247
Location: Istanbul

PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have known several foreigners who are vegetarian, but none who are vegan. I also know a couple of Turks who are vegetarian.

Eating out as a vegan is doable if you only stick to the vegetable mezes but it will be very repetitive.

Catering for yourself should be easy however, fresh produce is good and cheap, plenty of grains too.

I am surprised most Turks can affort to buy meat, red meat is very expensive here at the butchers.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Turkey All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC