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Teacher accreditation for Russia
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EmperorSweatyback



Joined: 09 Sep 2012
Posts: 3
Location: Missouri, USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:16 pm    Post subject: Teacher accreditation for Russia Reply with quote

In the forums I have seen a lot about CELTA accreditation for teaching in Russia. My question is whether the CELTA is the best option for teaching in Russia or if something like a 150 hour TESOL online course through Global English would be acceptable as well. Is it important that I specifically have a CELTA or will some other accreditation (like through Global English) be weighed equally by employers?
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coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1828

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best options are the CELTA or the Trinity. The point is that while some employers will accept other TEFL qualifications, others specifically ask only for CELTA/Trinity. So you rule yourself out of some jobs immediately and may also be at a disadvantage when in competition with teachers with these recognised qualfications.

As for online courses, no, forget these. They are completely disregarded by any serious employer. You must have experience of observing real classes taught by experienced teachers and you must have experience of teaching and being observed. The point about CELTA and Trinity in particular is that they are standardised courses, so the employer knows that you have had this experience.
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as I know, in terms of visa applications, it usually doesn't matter. But in terms of getting and being able to hold down a job, then ditto what Cole said. Go for a Celta or Trinity.
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EmperorSweatyback



Joined: 09 Sep 2012
Posts: 3
Location: Missouri, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I appreciate the responses! Thank you! My university here in the US offers a TESOL minor program which I had been considering as well, however, it sounds like even that is not nearly as useful as a CELTA.
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coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1828

PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But if this course gives you the necessary amount of teaching practice and observations of experienced ESOL/EFL teachers, then it's ok. If you can't reasonably get to or afford CELTA/Trinity, it may be a reasonable option. Do your research; see if they offer the same sort of experience as on CELTA/Trinity. (But do forget the online stuff; a waste of money.)
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ComradeBL



Joined: 28 Aug 2010
Posts: 70
Location: 'stan!

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:00 pm    Post subject: Depends where is home Reply with quote

There really isn't much difference between a CELTA or TESOL, except for one is issued out of the UK and the other out of the USA.

In PRC they like North American English better and Russia tends to be more biased towards British English. Having a CELTA for Russia probably will look better than a TESOL. However, once you open your mouth, they will know you're not British (from your post it sounded as if you're from North America; my apologies if not) and it really won't matter...

Quals help, but genetics & the proper passport will get you SO much further in this business. Is it fair? Nope, but whoever said life was fair...
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
There really isn't much difference between a CELTA or TESOL, except for one is issued out of the UK and the other out of the USA.


This is inaccurate. TESOL is only an acronym meaning Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, and it's used by a whole range of certification course providers from all over the world. Some are credible and some not.

Google it: https://www.google.ca/search?source=ig&rlz=&q=tesol&oq=tesol&gs_l=igoogle.3..0l9j0i10.208.1553.0.2116.5.5.0.0.0.0.199.948.0j5.5.0...0.0...1ac.1.VXFf9qh4fn0

The courses listed range from weekends to 40 hours to pure online to actual credible courses.

What the key really is: 120 hours minimum, and including actual supervised teaching practice with real students.

CELTA is the recognized name brand pretty much everywhere (including North America) but a generic that meets the above standard should usually be accepted by reputable employers.

The only real difficutly with a generic (assuming it meets the above key standards) is that employers may not immediately recognize it as sufficient, whereas with a CELTA, there is no question.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Quals help, but genetics & the proper passport will get you SO much further in this business.


By the way, I'm utterly mystified about this statement...particularly the 'genetics' bit... Shocked
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Russia is open to both British and American speakers of English. Though individual schools may have their own bias and preferences, both for and against either of these nationalities and Englishes, I wouldn't say that 'Russia tends to be more biased towards British English'. But you are right that it really won't matter either way.

As for passports and genetics, whatever the situation may be elsewhere, in a Russian classroom teaching ability is what counts. Much more than being a Briton or North American. And this is so despite some fairly overt racist tendencies in Russian society. (Which even manifests itself against Russian teachers who teach English...)
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coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1828

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some can be absolutely rabid. One of my students has been going on major rants about black people, people who come from villages and women. Most of these, he's never met or hasn't recognised it when he has. Women have different brains and therefore could never teach him satisfactorily. I won't even try to discuss the rest of his repertoir.
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Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 8928
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We've all met/encountered such types, and Russia does seem to have a higher proportion of 'em. But would you say that they are a representation of the vast majority of learners here? Or people here generally? I wouldn't.

Nor would I say that there is a strong bias against American teachers or American English. Yes, you'll hear rot like British English is 'Classical English', with a 'clean accent', but most serious learners disdain from making such pronouncements.
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coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1828

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:
We've all met/encountered such types, and Russia does seem to have a higher proportion of 'em. But would you say that they are a representation of the vast majority of learners here? Or people here generally? I wouldn't.

Nor would I say that there is a strong bias against American teachers or American English. Yes, you'll hear rot like British English is 'Classical English', with a 'clean accent', but most serious learners disdain from making such pronouncements.


I agree with you: they are not in the majority amongst learners here. Sometimes, I have my doubts about the population as a whole. Liberal views, or enlightenment values if you like, seem to be held by a minority, certainly if you ask people about their electoral behaviour.

British English is usually preferred, but yes, most learners know that American English will serve them perfectly well.
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ComradeBL



Joined: 28 Aug 2010
Posts: 70
Location: 'stan!

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Speaking from my time spent in East Asia, there is a definite reason why pictures are an essential requirement for an application package...As I heard numerous times, "If they are black, they may be from Africa and not a native speaker (vs. being Caucasian from Denmark and also NOT a native speaker)...Eh, go figure...

Yes, you're correct that the acronym TESOL/TEFL/TESL/etc/etc/etc has been adopted by fly by night operations, but the accepted programs (SIT, etc) are every bit as reputable as a CELTA.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9310
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

East Asia is not representative of the entire world.
'Genetics' play a far lesser role in other parts of the world in EFL/ESL alike.


SIT and Trinity are both considered the 'other' name brand TEFL certs.
Generics that meet the standard in terms of on-site hours and supervised teaching practice are accepted, so long as the prospective employer understands that they meet the standards.
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coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1828

PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2012 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't agree with the two contributions referring to the SIT. Most advertisements that I have seen, when they cite qualifications, refer to the CELTA and the Trinity but do not mention the SIT. This is not to say that the SIT is unworthy of comparison - I wouldn't know, to be honest - but it does mean that it suffers in terms of employer recognition, which might in some countries have a slightly detrimental effect upon a teacher's prospects. (International House in Moscow is an example. CELTA: yes. Trinity: yes. SIT: no mention. 'Equivalent qualifications': no mention.)
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