Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

McSchools: Applying-Job offer-Start: How long?
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Russia & C.I.S.
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
shinny



Joined: 07 Jun 2012
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2012 4:03 pm    Post subject: McSchools: Applying-Job offer-Start: How long? Reply with quote

Hey all! Sorry for choppy title but hope it's specific enough. I did a search on the boards but couldn't find the info I wanted.

Just how long on average should it take to get sorted with a job in one of the McSchools in Russia? From the initial applications to getting an offer and then gap of time between the offer and start date? Is it doable within 4 weeks?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jazziz23



Joined: 08 Apr 2011
Posts: 61

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2012 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would give yourself 3 months at least. Don't forget after the offer you will need to get a Letter of invitation. The school needs to apply to the government then send it to you. Then you need to apply for the work visa.

No way 4 weeks is enough. You will need an HIV test and if your passport isn't up to date to get that as well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
macan



Joined: 19 Aug 2012
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am currently in the middle of this process, I applied at the end of July. After completeing pre-interview tasks, doing the interview, reading contracts, emailling with recruiters about contract questions and clarification, considering other offers, accepting a job, waiting for the invitation, and getting everything prepared for the visa and for moving to another country (certified copies of diplomas, passport, just in case I need them...criminal record check, AIDS test...shopping for warm boots and jacket) I am currently sitting at 4 weeks and expect to wait at very least 3-4 more depending on processing times at the consulate here in Canada.

If you know for sure what school you want to work for, and they hire you, and you like their terms, then the first half of the process might be faster for you...I spent a lot of time checking and double checking legality, salary, benefits, visas etc. but as a result I am confident with the decision I made. there are a lot of sketchy organizations out there, make sure to reseach them before you apply.

I would say allow at least 3 months (there is a rush option on the visa if you want to pay for it...but it's doubtful that you'll be reimbursed for that by your employer)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And sometimes their administration is inefficient. If you don't hear from them for a while, you should remind them of your existence.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shinny



Joined: 07 Jun 2012
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 11:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay, well that has put paid to Russia. 3 months is too long for me right now. Cole, you mentioned Kiev in my other thread as possibly being faster to get set up in. What about South Korea, or other locations which accept a BA in English and a native speaker (with some teaching experience teaching music privately)?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I try to keep to what I know and my knowledge is in eastern Europe and England. So, sorry, I don't know which other countries have a high demand for new native speakers. By reputation, I would say Korea is probably right, but do check with those who really do know.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shinny



Joined: 07 Jun 2012
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will do, for sure. I looked into Kiev just there and it seems there can be a lot of hassle getting the work permit once your 3 month visa expires.
Korean job offers seem to come thicker and faster and so I've decided on it.. may the force be with me!


Last edited by shinny on Sat Sep 29, 2012 12:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good luck.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shinny



Joined: 07 Jun 2012
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 12:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just registered for Korean forum Coledavis.
I'm back again to Kiev though as not having to get a visa would save me time and money.

Have you any general advice off the top of your head in relation to teaching there, from what you might have heard from other teachers there, say? If not, no probs.

I'm going to start reading up on teaching English as a foreign language. I have one advantage as regards the teaching itself in that I am more or less self taught in the Irish language and achieved my fluency through learning the rules and the grammar.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9589
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My expertise is primarily in Central and Western Europe, but I have worked extensively with Easterners over the years. I'm a bit sceptical about your chances of getting an offer from any reputable school without any formal teacher training in the field. These students are extremely demanding in many cases, and having taught music and learned a foreign language yourself will help, but not substitute for at least an entry-level training course.

Reading up isn't really sufficient as there is no supervised teaching component; this is usually considered key be reputable employers.

I would guess Korea is still your best bet; they don't demand field-specific training there (yet).


Last edited by spiral78 on Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:12 pm; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9697
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yip, have to agree with Spiral there. Some formal teacher-training is a big plus, especially for Eastern Europe. Plenty of people get away with winging it, though, but only short-term. Which may suit your own plans. A teach-yourself-Irish book is not enough preparation though...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Spiral and Sasha have that right. I hadn't realised you were thinking about starting quickly and without a qualification. For Kiev to work quickly for you, you will need a qualification (CELTA/Trinity). While Kiev is good in that you can drift in and make appointments to see employers, do note that the employers are not silly. They will want to know what you know and what skills you have.

Re courses: On a good course, you get to teach groups of people and receive feedback from experienced teachers. Also, you observe experienced teachers. This means learning techniques, including effective board work and the application of grammar to practical conversation. What works for you on a DIY Irish course is not necessarily what will suit other people. (Before you ask 'which course?' please check threads on this subject on the newbie board.)

Also, do note that it is one thing getting a job, another thing holding it down. You may struggle if you don't really know what you are doing. Also, maybe you can get a job in Korea or somewhere without knowing much about language teaching, but that job is almost certainly going to be a bottom of the pile job. Aren't the better employers going to hold out for the better employees? I know I would.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
shinny



Joined: 07 Jun 2012
Posts: 16

PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sashadroogie wrote:
Yip, have to agree with Spiral there. Some formal teacher-training is a big plus, especially for Eastern Europe. Plenty of people get away with winging it, though, but only short-term. Which may suit your own plans. A teach-yourself-Irish book is not enough preparation though...


I went far beyond a teach-yourself-Irish book Sasha. I learned all grammatical terms and went as far as to compile my own in-depth grammar book for reference. I own and dissected almost every grammar book in the language, and read and listened to the language extensively and found novel ways to get fluent in the language. I have lots of tricks and methods.

Understand that I'm an all or nothing kind of girl and I don't go through life on a wing and a prayer.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
coledavis



Joined: 21 Jun 2003
Posts: 1837

PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pleased to hear it. However, you will need to know how to explain the grammar (concepts like present perfect) to others, to organise activities that lead to students' verbalising their knowledge and a fair number of other things too (boardwork, vocabulary acquisition methods, adapting to different levels of linguistic ability, etc). I'm not saying this to be difficult, and neither are my colleagues. I personally have seen people who have done their homework, maybe also attending weekend courses or correspondence courses, then having a miserable time because they found they weren't really prepared. You do not know what you do not know!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sashadroogie



Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 9697
Location: Moskva, The Workers' Paradise

PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All the best to you, Shinny. I hope it works out for you. But like Cole, I've seen more than a couple of new teachers have difficulties - even after a training course. Having taught yourself a language is a great start to helping you see where the learners are coming from. But therein lies the rub. As the truism has it, teaching is not the same as learning.

Anyway, all the best to you in your endevours. Please check back in with us for that vodka. It'll have to a cyber-vodka though, seeing as the Motherland couldn't call you over Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Russia & C.I.S. All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC