Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Changes since 5 years ago.
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Japan
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Alex_Ander



Joined: 13 Sep 2012
Posts: 57
Location: The fourth dimension.

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:23 pm    Post subject: Changes since 5 years ago. Reply with quote

Hi guys,

I used to live in Japan five years ago and I am returning now. I am wondering how life in Japan is different now from then (aside from the yen).

Thanks!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
timothypfox



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 372

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, not much at all really.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2012 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What exactly do you want to know? "Life" covers such a wide ground.

Visa matters have changed.
Salaries for teachers have generally done down.
Dispatch companies have grown.
JET has shrunk.
Schools and universities have shut down or merged.
The market is far tighter in practically all sectors.

There will soon be a rise in sales tax.
Gas prices have gone up.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alex_Ander



Joined: 13 Sep 2012
Posts: 57
Location: The fourth dimension.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
What exactly do you want to know? "Life" covers such a wide ground.

Visa matters have changed.
Salaries for teachers have generally done down.
Dispatch companies have grown.
JET has shrunk.
Schools and universities have shut down or merged.
The market is far tighter in practically all sectors.

There will soon be a rise in sales tax.
Gas prices have gone up.


So basically Japan has been going down hill? Anything on the bright side?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
timothypfox



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 372

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you have enough work, the standard of living is about the same.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 630
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The strength of the yen is positive if you want to exchange money in Japan.

Other things aren't good. The earthquake last year. People are still living in temporary housing.

Relations with China, Korea, and Taiwan aren't good.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 1043
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While Glenski's gloomy summary is not inaccurate, the overall standard of living is still pretty much the same. I don't encounter teachers saying, "Boy, I wish I'd left Japan five years ago when life was still good."

I suspect that Japan has become a poorer deal relative to other countries, but that is more a matter of other countries' improvement rather than Japan's decline. For instance, I was recently talking to a teacher who got a job offer from China. He tells me that, while the salary is significantly lower than he's getting now in Japan, when he factors in the lower living costs, free accommodation, plane ticket and so on, China looks like a better deal.

If you're thinking about the long-term, the trend is one of gentle decline. There is also a significant chance that the yen will be devalued sharply in years to come, unless the government can free itself from political paralysis and get to grip with the budget deficit. But if you're thinking about the long-term, Japan has never been a great prospect for English teachers: the career structure is pretty flat. My understanding is that a highly experienced, highly qualified teacher earns a surprisingly small premium over a young backpacker doing his first eikaiwa gig.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pitarou wrote:
While Glenski's gloomy summary is not inaccurate, the overall standard of living is still pretty much the same.
Higher sales tax, higher gasoline prices, lower salaries for the next 2 years in universities (to compensate for the Tohoku disaster), worries (founded or unfounded) about contaminated foods and soil... I'd call that a lower standard of living.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 1043
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 4:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
Pitarou wrote:
While Glenski's gloomy summary is not inaccurate, the overall standard of living is still pretty much the same.
Higher sales tax, higher gasoline prices, lower salaries for the next 2 years in universities (to compensate for the Tohoku disaster), worries (founded or unfounded) about contaminated foods and soil... I'd call that a lower standard of living.


I take your point. Your situation is rather different to mine.

As for me: I don't work in a university, spend very little on gas, and the sales taxes haven't bitten yet.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jmatt



Joined: 29 Apr 2012
Posts: 121

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While the info was gleaned mainly from job posts on this site, as well as the TESOL.org website, and mostly concerned with eikaiwa style jobs, I was a little surprised that salaries have gone down, if anything, in the last five to ten years. I'd have thought that with the implosion of NOVA and exodus of the "just doing it for the CV/quick money" set, as well as the earthquake/nuclear situation, demand would outstrip supply. Guess not.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
mitsui



Joined: 10 Jun 2007
Posts: 630
Location: Kawasaki

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Demand has gone down. People are spending less.
This really started around 2008, and is called the Lehman Shock in Japanese.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2012 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jmatt wrote:
While the info was gleaned mainly from job posts on this site, as well as the TESOL.org website, and mostly concerned with eikaiwa style jobs, I was a little surprised that salaries have gone down, if anything, in the last five to ten years.
Companies want to save money, too, and they know that there is still a plethora of newbies who are willing to take the small salaries. Some just want to be here, and others may come from countries where such low salaries are still high enough for them to live very cheaply and send the rest home to poor families.

Quote:
I'd have thought that with the implosion of NOVA and exodus of the "just doing it for the CV/quick money" set,
Who? Plenty of people still come for short stints. I think they always will. I don't know what exodus you meant. Most NOVA (and GEOS) employees stayed when g.com took over.

Quote:
as well as the earthquake/nuclear situation, demand would outstrip supply. Guess not.
Didn't you read the news? Most stayed or returned soon after escaping.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alex_Ander



Joined: 13 Sep 2012
Posts: 57
Location: The fourth dimension.

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2012 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, when I came 5 years ago, I had the whole "japanophile syndrome". Now that I am older and wiser, I am coming fpr the strength oh the yen.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Inflames



Joined: 02 Apr 2006
Posts: 416

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 3:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pitarou wrote:
For instance, I was recently talking to a teacher who got a job offer from China. He tells me that, while the salary is significantly lower than he's getting now in Japan, when he factors in the lower living costs, free accommodation, plane ticket and so on, China looks like a better deal.

In terms of things such as living costs, China looks better. However, if you consider the total quality of life, Japan is much, much better. There's no terrible pollution nor are there the disabled beggars. Everyone in Japan understands 標準語 (standard Japanese) but, outside of huge cities (especially Beijig), most people don't understand Mandarin and instead speak their local dialect. Japan is far safer than China as well (not just crime but accidents and food, for example).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 1043
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Inflames wrote:
Pitarou wrote:
For instance, I was recently talking to a teacher who got a job offer from China. He tells me that, while the salary is significantly lower than he's getting now in Japan, when he factors in the lower living costs, free accommodation, plane ticket and so on, China looks like a better deal.

In terms of things such as living costs, China looks better. However, if you consider the total quality of life, Japan is much, much better. There's no terrible pollution nor are there the disabled beggars. Everyone in Japan understands 標準語 (standard Japanese) but, outside of huge cities (especially Beijig), most people don't understand Mandarin and instead speak their local dialect. Japan is far safer than China as well (not just crime but accidents and food, for example).

Very important points.

What about Korea? I read that, when cost of living is taken into account, the Koreans are now richer than the Japanese.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Japan All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC