Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Noterized Degree Certificate
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Japan
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
72308



Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 31
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:13 pm    Post subject: Noterized Degree Certificate Reply with quote

Random question, does anyone know why ECC require a noterized copy of my degree certicate (which costs somewhere between 80 - 150 to have done) and AEON just take a quick glance at it in the interview and then never ask to see it again? I'm assuming they go though the same process to get the CofE, so any guesses? I'm not about to argue with ECC about their application process, I'm just interested to know if anyone knows why?

Thanks in advance.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
G Cthulhu



Joined: 07 Feb 2003
Posts: 1348
Location: Way, way off course.

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:00 am    Post subject: Re: Noterized Degree Certificate Reply with quote

UK? Any solicitor can notarize it. If it's the family solicitor they should do it for free. Most others will charge a minimal fee IME.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 1046
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can think of a few reasons why they might want a notarized copy after they've offered you the job, but not at the interview! I wonder whether there's somebody in AEON's offices instructing people to bring notarized copies without actually understanding what it means? You should mention it to them at some point.

By the way, did you check the cost of getting a duplicate degree certificate from your university? It might have been cheaper than notarization!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
G Cthulhu



Joined: 07 Feb 2003
Posts: 1348
Location: Way, way off course.

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pitarou wrote:
I wonder whether there's somebody in AEON's offices instructing people to bring notarized copies without actually understanding what it means?


Odds on favourite it's an American somewhere in the HR lineup making that call. The Japanese don't tend to know about notarization in the same sense, and Americans don't tend to realize how much trouble/expense can be involved in what is a quite different legal process outside the US.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Abdullah the Enforcer



Joined: 26 Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Location: In a hole

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

G Cthulhu wrote:
Pitarou wrote:
I wonder whether there's somebody in AEON's offices instructing people to bring notarized copies without actually understanding what it means?


Odds on favourite it's an American somewhere in the HR lineup making that call. The Japanese don't tend to know about notarization in the same sense, and Americans don't tend to realize how much trouble/expense can be involved in what is a quite different legal process outside the US.


Abdullah sees that poster is way, way off course!


Last edited by Abdullah the Enforcer on Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:54 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
HLJHLJ



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 918

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:52 am    Post subject: Re: Noterized Degree Certificate Reply with quote

G Cthulhu wrote:
UK? Any solicitor can notarize it. If it's the family solicitor they should do it for free. Most others will charge a minimal fee IME.



Any solicitor in the UK can certify a copy, but the vast majority cannot notarise anything, only a notary can. Some notaries are solicitors, many aren't. Any solicitor can arrange for documents to be notarised, but they will have to take them to a notary on your behalf. That usually just means you end up paying the solicitor's fee and the notary's fee.

If you have a good relationship with a solicitor you may be able to get a certified copy done cheaply, but it would be extremely unusual to get a document notarised free of charge.


Last edited by HLJHLJ on Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:16 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ZennoSaji



Joined: 02 Feb 2010
Posts: 87
Location: Mito, Ibaraki

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

G Cthulhu wrote:
Pitarou wrote:
I wonder whether there's somebody in AEON's offices instructing people to bring notarized copies without actually understanding what it means?


Odds on favourite it's an American somewhere in the HR lineup making that call. The Japanese don't tend to know about notarization in the same sense, and Americans don't tend to realize how much trouble/expense can be involved in what is a quite different legal process outside the US.

I'd second that theory. Notaries are $10 a signature here. Naturally, my jaw hit the floor when I saw the OP's quotes.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
72308



Joined: 01 Sep 2010
Posts: 31
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks guys, that's kinda what I thought - the American guy doing the interview couldn't believe that I'd never heard of a Notary and seemed to be under the impression that it was an easy thing to get done. I quickly realised when I looked up Notaries in the UK that I picked the wrong career - for complex cases they charge 200+ PER HOUR. I've opted to get a 'certified copy' done via the Post Office (which cost 7.50) and I'm hoping the impressive-looking Post Office stamp will suffice. If not, they can have my original and I'll just pay my Uni 20 for a new one Razz
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
stumptowny



Joined: 29 May 2011
Posts: 245

PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 5:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

72308 wrote:
Thanks guys, that's kinda what I thought - the American guy doing the interview couldn't believe that I'd never heard of a Notary and seemed to be under the impression that it was an easy thing to get done. I quickly realised when I looked up Notaries in the UK that I picked the wrong career - for complex cases they charge 200+ PER HOUR. I've opted to get a 'certified copy' done via the Post Office (which cost 7.50) and I'm hoping the impressive-looking Post Office stamp will suffice. If not, they can have my original and I'll just pay my Uni 20 for a new one Razz


I'd be gone by now. when I read your topic, i thought you mis-posted in the wrong country. i have never heard of anyone asking for notarized docs in japan. it's a korea thing.. but AEON is crap for vacation. little vacation. I would get with shane. they offer the most vacation for eikaiwa's.. maybe you are entering at a higher level, hence they are requesting this?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Inflames



Joined: 02 Apr 2006
Posts: 418

PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 12:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IIRC most of the ECC eikaiwa recruiters are Canadians, although they have very little control over the details of the process - Japanese staff pretty much set the requirements. This is actually pretty obvious as, in many places in the US, a notary can't certify copies of documents. The only time I (or anyone else I know) has used a notary is to verify the person signing a document.

ECC really wants a certified copy or the original of your degree.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
G Cthulhu



Joined: 07 Feb 2003
Posts: 1348
Location: Way, way off course.

PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe the American doing the interview simply didn't understand the difference between a notarized document and a certified document and just used the word they were used to?

Either way, the end result is to give them a certified copy and let them have at it. The embassy won't care and the employer shouldn't be relying on notarized documents for anything.

I've actually had the opposite extreme here in the US where someone showed up with documents with an Apostille attached and a clerk rejecting them, stating that "they had to be notarized." They had no clue whatsoever what an Apostille was. Retard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 1046
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

G Cthulhu wrote:
I've actually had the opposite extreme here in the US where someone showed up with documents with an Apostille attached and a clerk rejecting them, stating that "they had to be notarized." They had no clue whatsoever what an Apostille was. Retard.

Hey! I'd never heard of an apostille until I read this just now. Don't call me a retard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
G Cthulhu



Joined: 07 Feb 2003
Posts: 1348
Location: Way, way off course.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 1:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pitarou wrote:
Hey! I'd never heard of an apostille until I read this just now. Don't call me a retard.


I wouldn't. And remember, unless it's your job to handle documents and process them according to law, there's no particular reason you would need to know about apostille attestation. Cool
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Inflames



Joined: 02 Apr 2006
Posts: 418

PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 6:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the US a document with an apostille must have first been notarized (or stamped and signed by the government agency).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
G Cthulhu



Joined: 07 Feb 2003
Posts: 1348
Location: Way, way off course.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2012 3:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Inflames wrote:
In the US a document with an apostille must have first been notarized (or stamped and signed by the government agency).


How utterly, utterly pointless. Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Japan All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC