Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Students and Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Is Japan changing and becoming open to more foreigners?
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Japan
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
matador



Joined: 07 Mar 2003
Posts: 262

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:56 am    Post subject: Is Japan changing and becoming open to more foreigners? Reply with quote

Q. Are there many non-Japanese (such as Chinese) working in convenience stores like 7/11 in Tokyo? Is it very rare or normal? Thanks.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pitarou



Joined: 16 Nov 2009
Posts: 1027
Location: Narita, Japan

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:35 am    Post subject: Re: Is Japan changing and becoming open to more foreigners? Reply with quote

matador wrote:
Q. Are there many non-Japanese (such as Chinese) working in convenience stores like 7/11 in Tokyo? Is it very rare or normal? Thanks.
What the hell has Chinese workers on the graveyard shift got to do with Japan changing and opening up to foreigners?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hagiwaramai



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 119
Location: Marines Stadium

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apparently there's a guy called Lawson working at one Tokyo Lawsons. Big news!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
matador



Joined: 07 Mar 2003
Posts: 262

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just pondering whether anyone had noticed a trend over the past 3 or so years of more non-Japanese in the workforce particularly in the retail sector.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Apsara



Joined: 20 Sep 2005
Posts: 2142
Location: Tokyo, Japan

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see non-Japanese (Koreans, Chinese, Indians mostly) working at convenience stores, chain coffee shops like Doutor and fast food places (McDonald's in particular) a lot these days in Tokyo. I've seen Americans working at Starbucks too.

Yes, I'd say it's a trend of the last 4-5 years or so. Whether it means Japan is opening up a lot to foreigners I'm not sure!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jmatt



Joined: 29 Apr 2012
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apsara wrote:
I see non-Japanese (Koreans, Chinese, Indians mostly) working at convenience stores, chain coffee shops like Doutor and fast food places (McDonald's in particular) a lot these days in Tokyo. I've seen Americans working at Starbucks too.

Yes, I'd say it's a trend of the last 4-5 years or so. Whether it means Japan is opening up a lot to foreigners I'm not sure!


Considering that most convenience store transactions only involve a limited number of set phrases (not to say that non-Japanese workers can't speak the language) and very little, if any, chit-chat with customers (at least in Tokyo), makes sense that foreign workers would be in those jobs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Glenski



Joined: 15 Jan 2003
Posts: 12844
Location: Hokkaido, JAPAN

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.

Re: Chinese
Be aware that many might not be immigrants. They might have been born here like the zainichi Koreans.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jmatt



Joined: 29 Apr 2012
Posts: 112

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.

Re: Chinese
Be aware that many might not be immigrants. They might have been born here like the zainichi Koreans.


You're right, and that's what I was getting at----though, would the average foreigner be able to tell if the clerk wasn't native born Japanese, but Chinese or Korean raised in Japan?

Along those lines, just sort of compared it to the convenience stores near my house here---lots of social back and forth I'd never experienced in stores in Japan, where things were more formalized.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
GambateBingBangBOOM



Joined: 04 Nov 2003
Posts: 1897
Location: Japan

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jmatt wrote:
Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.

Re: Chinese
Be aware that many might not be immigrants. They might have been born here like the zainichi Koreans.


You're right, and that's what I was getting at----though, would the average foreigner be able to tell if the clerk wasn't native born Japanese, but Chinese or Korean raised in Japan?

Along those lines, just sort of compared it to the convenience stores near my house here---lots of social back and forth I'd never experienced in stores in Japan, where things were more formalized.


If someone were raised in Japan, how would a Japanese-born Japanese person know they were Chinese or Korean, but raised in Japan either? That would be like walking into a store in Canada and being able to tell that the caucasian guy behind the counter was born in Poland or wherever but had grown up in Canada (and therefore had a Canadian accent when he was speaking etc). Or even that the guy's parents had immigrated, but he, himself, had been born and raised in Canada and may or may not even speak Polish, and yet someone would just somehow know.

(and I'm not sure it would be easy to get a visa to work at 7/11. It's not like they need to import people to do that job. That means that the number of people who actually immigrated to Japan [as opposed to they, themselves being born here], who are working at a retail job is likely very low- probably mostly people on spousal visas or permanent residents).
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cool Teacher



Joined: 18 May 2009
Posts: 891
Location: Here, There and Everywhere! :D

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jmatt wrote:
Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.

Re: Chinese
Be aware that many might not be immigrants. They might have been born here like the zainichi Koreans.


You're right, and that's what I was getting at----though, would the average foreigner be able to tell if the clerk wasn't native born Japanese, but Chinese or Korean raised in Japan?
Along those lines, just sort of compared it to the convenience stores near my house here---lots of social back and forth I'd never experienced in stores in Japan, where things were more formalized.


I'M an average foreigner and I know when a Chinese person hasn't been born in Japan by the accent. Cool Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hagiwaramai



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 119
Location: Marines Stadium

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.


Ha. Potentially true but they would only have to react like the average Japanese clerk to a question ("doing something different, asking a question??!! Huh?? I'll get the supervisor") and they'd be fine.

I have noticed more foreigners in convenience stores recently though, mainly Chinese and South American Japanese, compared to 10/15 years ago.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Cool Teacher



Joined: 18 May 2009
Posts: 891
Location: Here, There and Everywhere! :D

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hagiwaramai wrote:
Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.


Ha. Potentially true but they would only have to react like the average Japanese clerk to a question ("doing something different, asking a question??!! Huh?? I'll get the supervisor") and they'd be fine.

I have noticed more foreigners in convenience stores recently though, mainly Chinese and South American Japanese, compared to 10/15 years ago.


It's good for diversity. But will it trouble the wa? Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hagiwaramai



Joined: 24 May 2010
Posts: 119
Location: Marines Stadium

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cool Teacher wrote:
hagiwaramai wrote:
Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.


Ha. Potentially true but they would only have to react like the average Japanese clerk to a question ("doing something different, asking a question??!! Huh?? I'll get the supervisor") and they'd be fine.

I have noticed more foreigners in convenience stores recently though, mainly Chinese and South American Japanese, compared to 10/15 years ago.


It's good for diversity. But will it trouble the wa? Shocked

Oh, undoubtedly. Which should be a good thing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
steki47



Joined: 20 Apr 2008
Posts: 680
Location: BFE Inaka

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hagiwaramai wrote:
I have noticed more foreigners in convenience stores recently though, mainly Chinese and South American Japanese, compared to 10/15 years ago.


Wow! Moving around the world to work at 7-11. That sounds really depressing. Is it better than the factory work they usually get?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
OneJoelFifty



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 463

PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GambateBingBangBOOM wrote:
jmatt wrote:
Glenski wrote:
jmatt,
I'd have to disagree. There are plenty of things that could be confusing for a clerk to learn. It's not just, "Here's your change. Thank you".

They deal with vendors and questions about paying bills through the mail. They would have to READ a lot, too, especially those forms for paying bills.

Re: Chinese
Be aware that many might not be immigrants. They might have been born here like the zainichi Koreans.


You're right, and that's what I was getting at----though, would the average foreigner be able to tell if the clerk wasn't native born Japanese, but Chinese or Korean raised in Japan?

Along those lines, just sort of compared it to the convenience stores near my house here---lots of social back and forth I'd never experienced in stores in Japan, where things were more formalized.


If someone were raised in Japan, how would a Japanese-born Japanese person know they were Chinese or Korean, but raised in Japan either?


My girlfriend mentioned the other day that she could tell the people working at a restaurant were Chinese...from the way they handed the menus to us with one hand. Perhaps they were just less well-trained Japanese, but there are things that distinguish one group from another.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Japan All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2011 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

Road2Spain - TEFL and Spanish with one year student visa
EBC