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Kidding Yourselves
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Mdog



Joined: 17 Dec 2009
Posts: 23

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:34 am    Post subject: Kidding Yourselves Reply with quote

Anybody trying to go back to North America and find a job as an ESL teacher is kidding themselves. Let me suggest finding another career or just remain in Korea or Saudi forever teaching English as a foreign/second language. One is better off enrolling in some tech school program and getting another career all together or just getting an MA, Med, or MAT.
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It's Scary!



Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 824

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went back to the US in 2010 and hooked up with my current job in ESL within four months! What's the prob, Bob?

Quote:
...is kidding themselves.


Possibly looking into a mirror might solve the mystery?

It's what you make of it...and yourself! (Let me guess, your from near Dallas...aren't you?)
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 840

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's Scary! wrote:
I went back to the US in 2010 and hooked up with my current job in ESL within four months! What's the prob, Bob?



I did a bit of looking for a job when I was in the US last summer, not that I really wanted a job, but just to get an idea of what was out there. I was offered two decent positions. One part time without benefits, but super pay and the other full time, full benefits and OK pay. I think people who can't find jobs over the long haul either don't have the credentials or don't have the experience or both. I have never, in my adult life, gone more than a month or 6 weeks without a job.
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chinagirl



Joined: 27 May 2003
Posts: 235
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 2:31 am    Post subject: full time ESL Reply with quote

I've been working in ESL full time since coming back from my work abroad. I have a great job in a public school. I recently saw a job posted for a tenure track ESOL position at a local community college in my area. There *is* work for credentialed teachers and people with master's degrees.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9484
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I landed two very good jobs in Canada, both within three months of arriving. But I've got the creds (MA). If you're at certification level only, it's obviously much tougher.

I've never been sure why people think that a 30-day entry-level certification course should guarantee solid employment in the long-term, worldwide. It wouldn't in any other field.
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VikingElvis



Joined: 19 Nov 2009
Posts: 31
Location: China

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2012 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I landed a job in the US with a BA, TEFL cert and no experience. While I admit my situation was rare, it's not impossible.

I know that the job situation in North America isn't awesome for TEFLers (or job seekers in general) right now - but I don't see how blind pessimism, or optimism for that matter, helps a job seeker's situation.
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johnslat



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 12679
Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2012 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dear VikingElvis,

How about "open-eyed realism"? Your situation (at least according to my experience) is "rare" indeed.

Was the job you landed well-paid? Were you able to live on your salary alone?

Regards,
John
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BadBeagleBad



Joined: 23 Aug 2010
Posts: 840

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2012 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

spiral78 wrote:

I've never been sure why people think that a 30-day entry-level certification course should guarantee solid employment in the long-term, worldwide. It wouldn't in any other field.


Spiral, you took the words out of my mouth! Not to mention those who moan and complain that they can't get a decent job with NO training at all. Somehow they think the ability to speak English somehow transforms them into English teachers.......
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VikingElvis



Joined: 19 Nov 2009
Posts: 31
Location: China

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 1:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

johnslat wrote:
Dear VikingElvis,

How about "open-eyed realism"? Your situation (at least according to my experience) is "rare" indeed.

Was the job you landed well-paid? Were you able to live on your salary alone?

Regards,
John


As it was part-time, it paid well for the hours I got. I was able to live off of my pay on the budget I had at the time. (Rent a room in a house, pay student loan debt, feed myself, etc.) To be fair, it was not enough to feed a family of four with a mortgage and two cars on.


Last edited by VikingElvis on Fri Feb 17, 2012 7:00 am; edited 1 time in total
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It's Scary!



Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Posts: 824

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 4:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've had a bit more luck. I earn a very good government salary with great government benefits to include wonderful health and retirement. The house is paid for as are the two cars. The son has his college paid for and the wife, who choses not to work...doesn't. My disposible income is about half of what it was overseas as we only pay for those things that you need to live on: taxes, food, gas, entertainment and so on. None of that pesky mortgage or car payments invade my paycheck.

We are very lucky to be in the position that we're in. And here I am, "just" a TESLer.

It's a reward for a life spent overseas having to suffer Turkish food (Yum!)!
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Captain_Fil



Joined: 06 Jan 2011
Posts: 604
Location: California - the land of fruits and nuts

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2012 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Turkish food...

...it's scary!

Shocked
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uh huh



Joined: 14 Oct 2011
Posts: 92
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2012 11:01 am    Post subject: Kidding themselves Reply with quote

At the risk of being considered a loser with a master's in TESOL and nine years experience and at the risk of being taken to task because I too would say (oh horror!) "...is kidding themselves," I agree that there are far fewer opportunities in the US, as evidenced by the number of postings on sites such as TESOL, Higher Ed Jobs, and Chronicle of Higher Education.

Last year, out of curiosity and mild interest, I asked my old boss about getting my part time NC community college job back. She said there were no openings because everyone was hanging on to their (!) classes.

There are several recent threads on this topic.

There's also a recent thread started by Johnslat about how language changes and evolves. Good read...
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chinagirl



Joined: 27 May 2003
Posts: 235
Location: United States

PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2012 7:08 pm    Post subject: don't forget public schools` Reply with quote

Understandably people looking for jobs in higher ed are having difficulties finding work, but there is a shortage of certified ESOL teachers in K-12 education. I would seriously advise people coming back from working overseas to look at teaching at the high school level or below. The work is steady, good benefits, and the immigrant and refugee population continues to grow nationwide.
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spiral78



Joined: 05 Apr 2004
Posts: 9484
Location: On a Short Leash

PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's also regional. I had no trouble at all finding a good job in Calgary, but Toronto is an entirely different kettle of fish, I understand.

I think overall it's obvious that there is more demand for EFL teachers in non-Anglophone countries, but of course there is work to be found in them as well; just probably in most cases higher quals are needed, and the market is obviously more competitive.
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timothypfox



Joined: 20 Feb 2008
Posts: 371

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alright let's get one thing straight. I assume by coming back to the states or Canada or wherever from overseas you mean get a job that will provide you an income with about the SAME standard of life if not BETTER?

Probably you are thinking that you are now EXPERIENCED and your experience overseas will make you more marketable in Canada and US. NOT NECESSARILY.

Having been through this process several years back in Montreal with a BA and a ESL Certificate, I can tell you the road is rocky. If you are content being a TEFLer reduced to being a part-time worker, you can get work in about 3-4 months at a converstion school. You can scramble up some coffee shop lessons probably too.

BUT, I found that in Montreal this did not get me near the standard of living I had in Japan.

I then pressed PLAY and REPEAT, and did this all again in New York City. I could find work in about a few weeks (because it is New York after all), but found it EXTREMELY hard to afford rent etc.

I then got an MA and public school teaching cert. and suddenly I could make a decent living with more and better paid jobs available. But, I ended up working in public schools which you may or may not want to do.

Using your MA to teach at colleges is usually sessional work and may or may not lead to rehiring the next semester.

Something about the educational climate in the US and Canada that is worth considering is that it is in a continual dialogue towards progress and self-revision. Sounds great on paper right? The reality is that particularly in public schools - teachers and their work are continually analyzed and you may be instructed to change your methodology entirely from one year to the next. It is also extremely political. Just read the papers and you will know what I mean...

Expect to be observed frequently in the US and Canada, and possibly even (in the worst case) having classrooms with glass windows so visitors and MANAGEMENT can see you teaching at ALL TIMES.

Needless to say, I am back overseas at a high school in Japan after suffering 4 tumultous years at a high school in New York City.

If you are coming back to the states or Canada, I suggest either having strong connections or getting an MA or ... as the poster suggests changing careers altogether...
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