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Smaller cities?

 
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MOOK



Joined: 21 Nov 2011
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 4:42 pm    Post subject: Smaller cities? Reply with quote

Hey everyone,

I'm planning on moving to South East Asia this Spring but don't think I can handle to traffic and pollution of the Asian mega cities. I've been living in Barcelona and Rome for the past year and would like to find a city of about that size (around 2 million) that still has some decent job opportunities. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:49 pm    Post subject: Re: Smaller cities? Reply with quote

MOOK wrote:
Hey everyone,

I'm planning on moving to South East Asia this Spring but don't think I can handle to traffic and pollution of the Asian mega cities. I've been living in Barcelona and Rome for the past year and would like to find a city of about that size (around 2 million) that still has some decent job opportunities. Does anyone have any suggestions?

Thanks


IF you have a passport from an anglophone country, a legitimate degree and a TEFL cert then the whole region is pretty much open with the exceptions of Indonesia (degree in "English" required) and the Philippines (no demand - they export English teachers to the rest of Asia).

Land, find a place you like and get a job. It's that easy.

China and Korea are the exceptions (jobs are usually found from abroad).

If you don't have a degree and/or do not have a passport from an anglophone country (UK, USA, Canada, Australia, NZ (sometimes Ireland and South Africa) then I wish you good luck. Legal work is largely not going to be available.

.
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Qaaolchoura



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Posts: 539
Location: 21 miles from the Syrian border

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 11:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Smaller cities? Reply with quote

tttompatz wrote:
with the exceptions of Indonesia (degree in "English" required)

My impression was that the diploma has to have the word "English" on it somewhere. My impression is that in theory this was meant to include education and applied linguistics majors (and one or two others), if their focus was on English, but since most colleges don't put more than the broad field on the diploma (mine doesn't even put majors on the diploma), and Indonesian officials, at least in Jakarta (where most of the jobs are) are too lazy or stubborn to look at transcripts, it de facto limits the field to English majors.

tttompatz wrote:

Land, find a place you like and get a job. It's that easy.

Well, I know that for Americans Vietnam is a bit difficult to get into as a tourist (you need a pre-arrival visa for one thing) though I know Australians who've done as you say.

I think Malaysia is a bit more difficult than you make out for much the same reasons ad the Philippines (as is Singapore, though that's a megacity and thus out). Also, I thought there wasn't much demand in Laos, Burma, or East Timor, at least not for paid teachers.

It seems to me like your advice might really only apply to Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam, once you get in. And on the topic of Thailand, I know Chiang Mai is a place many people like. Though I haven't been there myself, I recall you giving advice to another poster on finding jobs there sometime back.

Although if it's really as easy as you imply to get a job in Macau (or Hong Kong, though that's another megacity), I may have to go back there and look around.

tttompatz wrote:
China and Korea are the exceptions (jobs are usually found from abroad).

Are they? First jobs probably, but at least in Korea I was under the impression that people usually switched jobs while in country. Any rate, it's kind of irrelevant since Korea and most of China aren't really Southeast Asia. As tempted as I am to recommend Busan and a suggest a visit to the Korean boards, I suspect that the OP may be one of those people with a pathological hatred of the cold.

Regards,
~Q
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 4:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vietnam visas can be done on-line (for those flying in directly) or at an embassy in another SE Asian country for those who want to explore the various job markets. No big deal; it's not 1976. Diplomatic relations with the US were normalized in '95 and getting a visa is not difficult. There is work to be had and decent salaries for those who are qualified.

Laos is a new market and starting to grow as the country works to get into compliance with ASEAN guidelines.

The same is true of all of the ASEAN block due partly to the option of cross border employment under the ASEAN framework coming into force in Jan of 2015 and the requirement that English skills are required as a visa requirement for cross border employment within the ASEAN block.

EFL is a slow industry in Malaysia as a whole but there are jobs in the larger centers (test prep is experiencing a growth spurt).

Chiang Mai is a great place to take your TEFL course but a bad place to look for work (too many fresh TEFL grads looking for their first job). Move 100km in any direction and there is no shortage of work.

Getting a job in Macau is not easy. There are no jobs in the government / public school sector and only 3 language academies when I was last there.

I can't really speak to HK. I don't have much to do with the city other than as a tourist or in transit to elsewhere.

In Korea, even those who are changing jobs usually work through a recruiter and the process is not significantly different than the job search from abroad. The paperwork for a visa transfer at the end of a contract is a bit easier than a new visa but that is about it. Changing jobs mid contract is often nothing short of a nightmare.

.
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sigmoid



Joined: 21 Jan 2003
Posts: 994

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The same is true of all of the ASEAN block due partly to the option of cross border employment under the ASEAN framework coming into force in Jan of 2015...


"21 November 2012: ASEAN leaders have decided to delay the launch of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) for 12 months until 31 December 2015 to give more time to prepare regulations."

http://www.ttrweekly.com/site/2012/11/aec-launch-delayed-a-year/

In other words, don't hold your breath on this one. Most likely, the idea will eventually be scrapped.
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fred23



Joined: 23 Nov 2010
Posts: 10
Location: IRL

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 12:31 am    Post subject: Re: Smaller cities? Reply with quote

[quote="tttompatz"]
MOOK wrote:
Hey everyone,

\


If you don't have a degree and/or do not have a passport from an anglophone country (UK, USA, Canada, Australia, NZ (sometimes Ireland and South Africa) then I wish you good luck. Legal work is largely not going to be available.

.


Sometimes I don't get the fact that Ireland isn't included. Is it just because they think we are part of the UK? I can understand why SA is often excluded because the majority speak Afrikans daily but English is the primary language in Irealnd (except for a tiny area of about 3% of the population in the west that use it day to day, much less than the french speaking areas of Canada.)
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tttompatz



Joined: 06 Mar 2010
Posts: 1951
Location: Talibon, Bohol, Philippines

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 12:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

sigmoid wrote:
Quote:
The same is true of all of the ASEAN block due partly to the option of cross border employment under the ASEAN framework coming into force in Jan of 2015...


"21 November 2012: ASEAN leaders have decided to delay the launch of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) for 12 months until 31 December 2015 to give more time to prepare regulations."

http://www.ttrweekly.com/site/2012/11/aec-launch-delayed-a-year/

In other words, don't hold your breath on this one. Most likely, the idea will eventually be scrapped.


It means they are not yet in compliance and won't be by the time Jan 1015 rolls around so they gave themselves another 12 months to get everyone in compliance.

Rules are getting tighter NOW as they attempt to come into compliance before the deadlines. 36 months is not that long and rules have to be in place and actively enforced before that deadline.

The writing is on the wall. People can ignore it if they will but don't come back later and complain that they didn't know or bitch that they are having problems because of it.

.
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