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The OFFICIAL Motorcycle/Scooter thread!
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jinju



Joined: 22 Jan 2006

PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mods: thanks for not making this a sticky
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Antrugha



Joined: 05 Jan 2006
Location: On a 2-wheeled engine

PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keep your head about you, don't do stupid things and practice before going on any big trips.

that's what i did and i did fine on my 125cc. Sure, more power would be nice some times but damn am I happy I only went with 125cc! Gave me a lot of room to make the mistakes I did at the beginning and not... well, die. Beyond that, riding in Korea is awesome. If I were staying another year, I'd definitely be upgrading to a 400 or 600cc bike. If anyone wants any tips about places to go, lmk. I've done the whole circle tour thing. And yes, it can be done on a 125, and it can be quite enjoyable.
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IlIlNine



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Location: Gunpo, Gyonggi, SoKo

PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bibbitybop wrote:
IlIlNine, thanks for spending the time time write all of that.

To everyone else: I recommend taking a motorcycle driving course if you've never properly learned to ride a cycle. Unfortunately, I don't know if they are available in Korea. My friends who took a certified course were able to save their asses in dangerous situations. My friends who didn't, the ones who "learned from a friend," crashed their bikes by making mistakes we learned to avoid in the cycle course.


Agreed! Unfortunately, the motorcycle courses in Korea are only geared towards passing the test. Actually, if you go to a motorcycle hagwon here, you won't ever have to change gears or touch the front brake! I didn't even need to use the gas at all because the bike I was using there had a high idle and was happy putting around without giving it any gas (but being gentle with the cliutch).

Unfortunately, this means that if you want to properly learn how to ride a motorcycle in Korea, it means going it alone or having a friend help - both can be dodgy. If you get a chance to do a course in your home country - I also highly reccomend it.

Jinju: Please keep it on-topic. Why didn't you just PM the mods your thank-you instead of crapping on my thread?

Antrugha: Re: the circle tour. What route did you take on the east coast? Hwy 7 is okay for the more northerly bits, but down towards the middle of the country it's restricted to motorcycle traffic (I got pulled over because of it - and not because I was going 170kph! Laughing They made me turn around)

That bears repeating:

DON'T DO STUPID THINGS.

and, if you're on a motorcycle - you always lose vs. a car. It doesn't matter who's at fault - so give them lots of room, even if they're driving horribly. Also - one lesson I learned (seems pretty obvious): stay on the road - be really careful going around traffic!
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captain kirk



Joined: 29 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This thread should be in General Discussion since it is about riding and motorbikes IN Korea. Off-topic is for worldwide whatever (mental events?).

I've been riding a 750Vtwin for two years. I know how it handles, am comfortable on it, but would like to try an inline four 'sport tourer'. I sometimes spend 11 hours a day on the 750, touring around Korea on the weekends, it's very comfortable. I'd like an suggestions re; what type of inline four to 'upgrade' to.

A bike I really would like is a used Yamaha xjr 1300. It has a retro styling and 'sit up and beg' riding posture, which would be more comfortable on long days in the saddle. Honda CBR 1000 and CBR 1200, used, come up more often. I've seen it said, in reviews, that the Honda CBRs handle so well that they are 'boring'. The bike's design makes maneuvering so smooth there is less skill involved. While the layout of the Yamaha xjr 1300 means one has to master the bike, anticipate corners and set up for them, 'manhandle' it thru corners which, on a powerful bike, is rewarding and exciting.

There are many more Honda CBRs (1000, 1200) around, though, and they go quite cheap sometimes. Does anyone have comments on the bikes I've mentioned and their type in general, pros and cons. The odd Yamaha Vmax 1200 appears on the used bike listings, as well (and the 750 'baby Vmax).
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IlIlNine



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Location: Gunpo, Gyonggi, SoKo

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

captain kirk wrote:
This thread should be in General Discussion since it is about riding and motorbikes IN Korea. Off-topic is for worldwide whatever (mental events?).

I've been riding a 750Vtwin for two years. I know how it handles, am comfortable on it, but would like to try an inline four 'sport tourer'. I sometimes spend 11 hours a day on the 750, touring around Korea on the weekends, it's very comfortable. I'd like an suggestions re; what type of inline four to 'upgrade' to.

A bike I really would like is a used Yamaha xjr 1300. It has a retro styling and 'sit up and beg' riding posture, which would be more comfortable on long days in the saddle. Honda CBR 1000 and CBR 1200, used, come up more often. I've seen it said, in reviews, that the Honda CBRs handle so well that they are 'boring'. The bike's design makes maneuvering so smooth there is less skill involved. While the layout of the Yamaha xjr 1300 means one has to master the bike, anticipate corners and set up for them, 'manhandle' it thru corners which, on a powerful bike, is rewarding and exciting.

There are many more Honda CBRs (1000, 1200) around, though, and they go quite cheap sometimes. Does anyone have comments on the bikes I've mentioned and their type in general, pros and cons. The odd Yamaha Vmax 1200 appears on the used bike listings, as well (and the 750 'baby Vmax).


Yes, perhaps it should be in General Disussion. Maybe I can ask one of the mods to move it.

There are no CBR 1200 or 1300. Maybe you were thinking CB (minus the R). The highest displacement CBR is the 1100XX @ 1100CC. It would be a great tourer. That or the Honda VFR 800. Don't let the 800CC fool you. It's fast. Much much faster than your twin. However the VFR has a V-4 design, which falls out of your requested parameters. Those two are more on the sporting side of 'sport tourer'.

You could also try something like a Honda 599 or 919. They are unfared standard bikes though so wind might be a problem.

I do take exception to the "it's too good, which makes it boring" thing. I've seen the same thing in reviews. I think it's a little silly. Too good? Too smooth? Is there such a thing? I know one thing for sure -- when I ride - it's ME that makes the ride fun, not my bike.
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captain kirk



Joined: 29 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, CB 1000, 1200, etc. That's what I meant. I have no experience with sport or sport tourer bikes. So when I say 'inline four' that's not an expectation. I don't know about V4s, first I heard of them. Sport/sport touring bikes I've paid almost no attention to. But as I have chugged along on my Yamaha 750 I have slowly realized it's a bit like riding a cow, so I want a change, to have some fun.

I'll look up those bikes you mentioned. I'm 106kg and want something more powerful that I can ride all day in relative comfort, which is possible on the Virago, easily. I was going to simply change to the 1100 Virago but I don't know why I should be particularly devoted to it, and the cruiser style*. Truth is I upgraded through this type because they seem safer (125 VS125, Yam 150, 500Vulcan, 750Virago), and sport tourers look cramped on a mission.

The Honda CB and Yamaha XJR, though, have more of a 'sit up and beg' posture that would allow wearing a backpack, and tying a load onto the flat passenger bit of the seat end. I use my bike to haul, and go on long trips, sometimes wearing a heavy backpack as well, so don't want to be leaning forward. And wind is not a problem, I rather like it.

*Especially after finding out the 1100 Virago Vtwin burns 40 miles per gallon. As does the Yamaha XJR 1300. Which is more fun? Obviously the latter.
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IlIlNine



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Location: Gunpo, Gyonggi, SoKo

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 3:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

captain kirk wrote:
Yes, CB 1000, 1200, etc. That's what I meant. I have no experience with sport or sport tourer bikes. So when I say 'inline four' that's not an expectation. I don't know about V4s, first I heard of them. Sport/sport touring bikes I've paid almost no attention to. But as I have chugged along on my Yamaha 750 I have slowly realized it's a bit like riding a cow, so I want a change, to have some fun.

I'll look up those bikes you mentioned. I'm 106kg and want something more powerful that I can ride all day in relative comfort, which is possible on the Virago, easily. I was going to simply change to the 1100 Virago but I don't know why I should be particularly devoted to it, and the cruiser style. Truth is I upgraded through this type because they seem safer (125 VS125, Yam 150, 500Vulcan, 750Virago), and sport tourers look cramped on a mission.

The Honda CB and Yamaha XJR, though, have more of a 'sit up and beg' posture that would allow wearing a backpack, and tying a load onto the flat passenger bit of the seat end. I use my bike to haul, and go on long trips, sometimes wearing a heavy backpack as well, so don't want to be leaning forward. And wind is not a problem, I rather like it.


All bikes mentioned go like spit - especially the CBR1100XX. I mean - your weight isn't much of a consideration.

Put it this way: Your bike has 52 HP. The CBR1100XX has about 152. The VFR, 599 and 919 have about 100 (the 919 a bit more, obviously). That Honda CB1300 (a super bike!) has about 114 hp. Any of those bikes will do anytihng you'll ask of them effortlessly. Considering your size - the 599 may be out - it's the smallest one of the bunch and may not be as comfortable.

All will have room for luggage. I personally like the VFR 800 Interceptor.

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Cerebroden



Joined: 27 Dec 2006

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 5:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

with all the shifting here...I would clutchless upshift depending on how a k bike's tranny is...On all my bikes back home I did it and my clutches still haven't worn out. Although, I agree with pretty much everything said here.
I really don't see how anything higher than a 650 would ever be needed here. I've got a 998 sitting in storage back in the states and I wouldn't dream of bringing it here. No room to stretch out its legs. I didn't even ship my 750 for the same reasons. I ride out on a 49 cc scoot here and I'll tell you that it takes a beating, I've had it over a year and maintanence? Ha, all I do is add more oil when the light comes on. I actually broke down and bought a new brake pad assembly type deal (its not pads it looks more like a clamp) because I'm starting to feel that I abuse the bike too much. With 49cc's if you wanna keep up with the adoshi's on their 125's you gotta know how to outbreak em. Twisted Evil

and my 750 is a virago...its about as old school sport tourer as you can get. Get a luggage rack and wild out. Its not a cow compared to an R1 more like a lazy boy. Just becareful on lean angle.
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captain kirk



Joined: 29 Jan 2003

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

At 52 horsepower, compared to a 100hp sport tourer, the Virago 750 is bovine. You didn't bring over your Virago because there's no room for the Virago to 'stretch its legs'. I've been driving mine for two years here. I guess you mean max out the speedometer. Ok, fair enough, bikes aren't allowed on the Korean 'superhighways'.

I was reading a bike review and one writer said the joy of motorcycling is accelerating on short stretches of highway. On my bovine Virago, chugging along making gear music with its Vtwin, which I surely enjoy, a superbike appears and disappears like its pilot has had two double espressos. Could I be feeling what that pilot is? Nope, not on old Bessie.

There's something 'better' in the sound of the Vtwin, compared to the real fast movers, though. Acceleration wise, however, it's a rocking chair (compared to those bikes that are twice its hp, of course). I feel like Grandad on the damn thing after two years cruising around, 'living dangerously'.


Last edited by captain kirk on Mon Apr 02, 2007 6:17 am; edited 1 time in total
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IlIlNine



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Location: Gunpo, Gyonggi, SoKo

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 6:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, I don't know. There are quite a few places that I know of that are nice for pinning the throttle. I've certainly been quite close to my bike's top speed quite a few times.

That - and the mountainous areas are just so much more fun with a little bit of grunt. Sure, you can struggle up hills - or you can carve them up.

Spped cameras only take pictures of front plates. Motorcycles have no front plates. It's really one of the biggest benefits of having a bike here.

So - if you stay in the city, a fast bike's a waste. However, if you get out of town and hit the backroads, there are plenty of chances to wind 'er up. More-so, I would say, than back home.
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thekingofdisco



Joined: 29 Oct 2004

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, the speed camera factor is great Very Happy

It's annoying when you randomly get the speed bumps on the country lanes though!
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Cerebroden



Joined: 27 Dec 2006

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I mean exactly that, I've taken my virago up in the "mountains" of the states and never had any problem "chugging" along as you put it...of course you're gonna get passed by someone on a sport bike, but...since bikes aren't allowed on highways and "spirited" riding at higher speeds is incredibly not safe...especially here. I didn't bring it because it's not the easiest thing to split lanes in. And that's pretty much how I get around here.
In hindsight would I like to have it to go into the country? Probably, but then some korean would probably steal it so I'd be back at square one.

Get a bike, take it to the track....experience the joy of going balls out and not having to be incredibly scared if there is a fallen tree waiting for you around the next corner.
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Pyongshin Sangja



Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Location: I love baby!

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, pay as much as you want for used bikes. It's still not a guarantee that they're in good shape.
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IlIlNine



Joined: 15 Jun 2005
Location: Gunpo, Gyonggi, SoKo

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cerebroden wrote:
I mean exactly that, I've taken my virago up in the "mountains" of the states and never had any problem "chugging" along as you put it...of course you're gonna get passed by someone on a sport bike, but...since bikes aren't allowed on highways and "spirited" riding at higher speeds is incredibly not safe...especially here. I didn't bring it because it's not the easiest thing to split lanes in. And that's pretty much how I get around here.
In hindsight would I like to have it to go into the country? Probably, but then some korean would probably steal it so I'd be back at square one.

Get a bike, take it to the track....experience the joy of going balls out and not having to be incredibly scared if there is a fallen tree waiting for you around the next corner.


My bike's much thinner than most I've come across - it splits lanes like a champion.

Yeah - you're right through - it's not the most practical thing. I have underground parking with monitoring. My bike's chained to a big pole. I'm pretty careful about where I park it too...

The other aspect of owning a nice bike in Korea is the community. I've met an incredible amount of really cool people because of my bike. Koreans who own nice bikes tend to be in the upper echelons of society - who else would have that kind of dosh to spend on something that's seen as 'incredibly dangerous' by most people? That also means they're typically more open minded than your average cat on the street.

Speaking of tracks - apparantly there's one in Yongin! I've only recently found this out... but I hear that for a pretty small fee you can go at certain times and race the bike around. If anyone knows more information about this - please share!

Pyongshin Sangja: Undeniably true - and something we haven't talked about here too much. By-and-large, it seems that the dealers on twaegyero are a bunch of crooks... At this point, I would only buy a bike from a shop that was reccomended to me by someone I trust. You can always buy new!

Still - you don't get something for nothing - and if you buy a really really cheap bike, chances are you're not going to get something good.
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Pyongshin Sangja



Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Location: I love baby!

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

True dat. Caveat emptor.
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