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The Korean Language Question And Answer Thread
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nate1983



Joined: 30 Mar 2008

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2012 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

joesp wrote:
my gilrlfriend said that "있어요"and "있나요" are the same.


Well, Koreans are notoriously bad about being able to explain the intricacies of their own language.

As with most things, the difference in "있어요?", "있죠?", "있나요?" is not in the information being requested but in the tone/speaker's frame of mind. The way I see it, roughly:

사과 있어요? - Do you have any apples? (neutral)
사과 있나요? - Do you happen to have any apples? (wondering)
사과 있죠? You've got some apples, don't you? (depending on tone, meeting one's expectation)
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mrthingy



Joined: 20 Mar 2011

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2012 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, I've been working my way through Rosetta stone korean over the last few weeks and have been doing OK so far. But one bit has really confused me and I'm hoping someone can provide an answer.

Why do you sometimes use 를/을 and sometimes 한테.

I know 를/을 is some kind of marker, does 한테 replace it to mean 'give/gives'?

The example sentences are:

여자아이가 하머니를 안아요
The girls hugs her grandmother. Correct?

아버지가 아들한테 뽀뽀해요
The father gives his son a kiss. Correct?

저는 여동생을 사랑해요
I love my younger sister. Correct?


Is it just that 'love' and 'hug' is something you do, where as a kiss is something you give?


Can anybody clear this up for me? I guess maybe it's just that I think of a hug and a kiss as something you can do to someone or give to someone.
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out of context



Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Location: Daejeon

PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Is it just that 'love' and 'hug' is something you do, where as a kiss is something you give?


Yep, that's basically it. The -에게 form is like an indirect object.
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mnjetter



Joined: 21 Feb 2012
Location: Seoul, S. Korea

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 5:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does anybody know how to say "nutrition guide" or "nutrition information" in Korean? Specifically, I am trying to figure out how (or if) I can find calorie information for the menu items at Hansot (www.hsd.co.kr). But the site is flash-based, so I can't use Google Translate to get a rough idea of what stuff says, and I have been poring over my dictionary for words like "nutrition" and "calories" for a while now, to no avail. That kind of function may not even be available for Hansot, but there are too many menu and submenu items on the website for me to be sure.
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T-J



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Location: Seoul EunpyungGu Yonshinnae

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


Nutrition 영양

Ingredients 성분

Usually appears as 영양 성분

열량 is the Korean for heat unit (calorie) but you may well see it simply written as 칼로리.

Hope that helps.
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Drew345



Joined: 24 May 2005

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 4:56 pm    Post subject: Some travel Questions Reply with quote

I am getting ready for a trip and not sure how to ask a couple of important questions.

1. "Do you have a bus with 3 seats across, (instead of regular 4 seats across)? I like the wider seats."

You know how most Korean buses have 4 seats across (2 on left and 2 on right), but some newer buses have only 3 seats across (2 on left and 1 on right). I really like the wider seats on the 3 seat across bus. I have tried to ask "넓은 자리 버스 있어요?" But often this seems to be confusing because, I guess, the regular buses have plenty wide seats to most Koreans. I would really like to ask about a "3 seat across bus" , or maybe there is a special name for that kind of bus.

2. "Do you have sheets on the beds in this hotel?"

Outside Seoul I found that most hotels and condos just put a mattress protector on the mattress and a blanket 이불 on top. Since mattress protector and 이불 are difficult to wash, I suspect they are rather dirty. I much prefer a bed with a bottom sheet (between me and the mattress protector) and a top sheet (between me and the 이불). Instead of having to go look at the rooms in every hotel, I just like to ask, "Do you have sheets on the beds?" I try "침대에서 시트 있어요?" But I always get only confusion from that question (and usually there are no sheets). Either sheet (bedsheet) is not actually "시트", or I am saying it all wrong, or the whole concept of sheets on a bed is something inconceivable. Is there a clear way to ask "Do you have sheets on the beds in this hotel?" without having to go look at the rooms?

Thanks, Drew
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T-J



Joined: 10 Oct 2008
Location: Seoul EunpyungGu Yonshinnae

PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2012 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


1. 좌석줄 세짜리 좌석 버스 있어요?

2. 침대에 얇은 시트 있어요?
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joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2012 5:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

#1) I am an executive-class?? my buses are three seats with an aisle in the middle.

#2) the verb for "to spread a sheet on a bed" is 깔다, it would be nice to put that in there somewhere. I also know they use 침대보 for a bedsheet, so if they don't understand "시트"you may want to say that.

침대에서 시트(침대보)를 깔았어요?

시트(침대보)가 깔린 침대가 있어요?

and by way of the longer explanation:

모텔들은 평소 침대보를 안 깔고 이불과 매트레스 사이에는 아무것도 없으니 (끼어들려 없으니) 쫌 두렵다고 생각해요. 침대보가 깔린 방이 없으면 침대보 2장을 저한테 맡겨 주시면 감사하겠어요.
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out of context



Joined: 08 Jan 2006
Location: Daejeon

PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2012 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The deluxe (우등) buses are the ones with the wider seats, so you should just ask for an 우등버스 ticket. The person may have been confused because the word 자리 is a bit vague, since it can refer to any kind of space. You should probably use 좌석 to be more specific.

Re: the sheets, I think it actually is because the concept is kind of foreign, especially at the facilities that don't typically cater to international guests. The term 시트 is correct; it's just that most people don't use them, and a lot of hotels presumably don't see any reason to carry them. A 침대보 is specifically a mattress cover.
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Drew345



Joined: 24 May 2005

PostPosted: Thu Oct 11, 2012 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks all,
It's good to know the name of that deluxe bus (우등), thanks for that. I'll go try to buy the tickets today.

Yeah, I thought about the sheets on the bed question more and realized it might be like asking an American hotel if their floor heating is warm, or going into an American Burger Joint and asking if their kimchi is home made. The confusion comes from being a foreign concept rather than an actual translation issue.
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sublunari



Joined: 11 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone want to tackle 자기? Every time I hear a Korean say 자기가 it totally throws me off. They seem to use it as some sort of all-purpose pronoun, so far as I can tell, but it can also refer to your boyfriend or girlfriend apparently...? Enlightenment please. Is it possible that I'm getting screwed just because I don't have enough context to guess what 자기 could be referring to in each various sentence?
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daeguowl



Joined: 06 Aug 2009
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sublunari wrote:
Anyone want to tackle 자기? Every time I hear a Korean say 자기가 it totally throws me off. They seem to use it as some sort of all-purpose pronoun, so far as I can tell, but it can also refer to your boyfriend or girlfriend apparently...? Enlightenment please. Is it possible that I'm getting screwed just because I don't have enough context to guess what 자기 could be referring to in each various sentence?


자기, 자기전에 자기 짐 챙길래?
Darling, before you go to sleep, would you pack your luggage

자기 can be the equivalent to "Darling" or "honey" when calling your significant other.

자기 can mean your(self), him(self), similar to 본인

김선생에게 물어봤는데 자기도 모른다고 했어
I asked Mr Kim but he said he did not know either.

김선생이 자기 늦겠다고 알려줬어.
Mr Kim told me that he himself would be late.

김선싱은 자기 거 누가 훔쳐갔다고 했어
Mr Kim said that someone had stolen his one.

A: 좀 도와주면 안돼?
B: 자기가 해!
A: Can't you help me?
B: Do it yourself!
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thatkidpercy



Joined: 05 Sep 2010

PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sublunari wrote:
Anyone want to tackle 자기? Every time I hear a Korean say 자기가 it totally throws me off. They seem to use it as some sort of all-purpose pronoun, so far as I can tell, but it can also refer to your boyfriend or girlfriend apparently...? Enlightenment please. Is it possible that I'm getting screwed just because I don't have enough context to guess what 자기 could be referring to in each various sentence?


daeguowl's explanation is great. I'll just add that 자기, when used to refer to your bf/gf, is pretty much strictly used between the couple themselves (if your girlfriend asks "자기야 뭐행?" you'd be safe to assume she's referring to you).

If you encounter the word in the wild it's most likely being used as a pronoun meaning himself/herself/yourself, unless the person is purposefully trying to speak in a very cutesy way about their significant other - probably safe to assume that's not the case 99% of the time.

Just for fun, look up the words 자신 and 스스로, too.
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joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:13 am    Post subject: NEW QUESTION Reply with quote

신문과 텔레비전, 인터넷을 통해 받아들이는 현실은 한결같이 끔찍하고 추악하고 말도 안되는가 하면 / 슬프고 비극적이고 더러 지겹다.

Can anybody translate the above sentence. i am confused because after the "/" I added, there appears to be no subject and I'm not sure how to connect it to the first part of the sentence.

My guess is

When the reality presented to us by newspapers, the TV, and the Internet is stomach-wrenching, horrendous, and unfathomable, we ourselves become sad, tragic and disgusted.

but I completely made up the underlined portion.
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joesp



Joined: 16 Jan 2008

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never mind. It is just like a listing of A 이면 B means A and B.

Explained as: [동일한 명사가 반복적으로 쓰여] 지정하여 예를 드는 것마다 다 그러함을 나타낸다

그는 공부면 공무, 운동이면 운동, 못하는 것이 없다
이 식당은 갈비면 갈비, 냉면이면 냉면, 모든 음식이 맛있다.

No, I guess the author uses 는가 하면 because he's making some fancy construction with 말도 안되다.

I also mis-translated 더러 지겹다 as disgusted (should be translated as something like "sometimes wearisome/tedious"

Sorry folks!
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