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Things back home that would annoy Koreans/foreigners
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Smithington



Joined: 14 Dec 2011

PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

- Having their drivers license suspended, and they've only been in the country a week.
- Getting thrown out of a restaurant and all they did was drool a lugie into the ashtray.
- Being confronted for sneezing on people, cutting in line, bumping into people, staring at black peole, etc..
- Having a boss who's younger than you, and she's from South-East Asia.
- Being invited to Mr. Smith's house for dinner and never being invited back.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 8:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smithington wrote:
- Having their drivers license suspended, and they've only been in the country a week.
- Getting thrown out of a restaurant and all they did was drool a lugie into the ashtray.
- Being confronted for sneezing on people, cutting in line, bumping into people, staring at black peole, etc..
- Being invited to Mr. Smith's house for dinner and never being invited back.

If I had ten thousand dollars for every time these happened I'd still be poor.

Seriously did you actually interact with Korean people back home or are you basing this on ridiculous stereotypes?

How would you feel if some Korean wrote

"Things Foreigners get annoyed by in Korea"

-There's no pizza and hamburgers at every lunch.
-Having an Asian person as a boss
-Not being able to riot over a sporting event
-Not having a gun to shoot
-Not having everyone speak English
-Not being able to go to the drive-through all the time and having to actually walk.

Sound insulting? Sound untrue? Sound like the person has never even talked to a foreigner in Korea? Of course.

And for the same reason, your post, and hte posts like it, are complete crap.
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PatrickGHBusan



Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Location: Busan (1997-2008) Canada 2008 -

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 4:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smithington, Sr is right, that post of yours was pretty ignorant and insulting...it was also not based on anything other than some need to be snarky...
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Newbie



Joined: 07 Feb 2003

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:


How would you feel if some Korean wrote

"Things Foreigners get annoyed by in Korea"

-There's no pizza and hamburgers at every lunch. [1]

-Not being able to riot over a sporting event [2]
-Not having a gun to shoot [3]
-Not having everyone speak English [4]
-Not being able to go to the drive-through all the time and having to actually walk. [5]


Sound insulting? Sound untrue? Sound like the person has never even talked to a foreigner in Korea? Of course.

And for the same reason, your post, and hte posts like it, are complete crap.


Well now, if we're talking Americans (my numbering of 1,3, and 5) and European soccer fans (my numbering of 2), and stupid white North Americans (number3) I'd say your examples are pretty accurate!

Sorry, I couldn't help myself Laughing
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NilesQ



Joined: 27 Nov 2006

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
Smithington wrote:
- Having their drivers license suspended, and they've only been in the country a week.
- Getting thrown out of a restaurant and all they did was drool a lugie into the ashtray.
- Being confronted for sneezing on people, cutting in line, bumping into people, staring at black peole, etc..
- Being invited to Mr. Smith's house for dinner and never being invited back.

If I had ten thousand dollars for every time these happened I'd still be poor.

Seriously did you actually interact with Korean people back home or are you basing this on ridiculous stereotypes?

How would you feel if some Korean wrote

"Things Foreigners get annoyed by in Korea"

-There's no pizza and hamburgers at every lunch.
-Having an Asian person as a boss
-Not being able to riot over a sporting event
-Not having a gun to shoot
-Not having everyone speak English
-Not being able to go to the drive-through all the time and having to actually walk.

Sound insulting? Sound untrue? Sound like the person has never even talked to a foreigner in Korea? Of course.

And for the same reason, your post, and hte posts like it, are complete crap.


I'd be quite rich if I had $10,000 for every time I've seen a Korean spit in an ashtray, in Korea. I think the purpose of this thread is to imagine taking a Korean, not Korean American, and putting them in a western nation. What is done in Korea that wouldn't fly in the west and vica versa.

One of my burnt into my psyche moments when I first arrived was seeing this beautiful Korean woman all dressed up for a night on the town hawk a loogie and spit into an ashtray at a galbi place. It was too funny. However, I don't see people do that as much as they used to.
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Steelrails



Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Location: Earth, Solar System

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NilesQ wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
Smithington wrote:
- Having their drivers license suspended, and they've only been in the country a week.
- Getting thrown out of a restaurant and all they did was drool a lugie into the ashtray.
- Being confronted for sneezing on people, cutting in line, bumping into people, staring at black peole, etc..
- Being invited to Mr. Smith's house for dinner and never being invited back.

If I had ten thousand dollars for every time these happened I'd still be poor.

Seriously did you actually interact with Korean people back home or are you basing this on ridiculous stereotypes?

How would you feel if some Korean wrote

"Things Foreigners get annoyed by in Korea"

-There's no pizza and hamburgers at every lunch.
-Having an Asian person as a boss
-Not being able to riot over a sporting event
-Not having a gun to shoot
-Not having everyone speak English
-Not being able to go to the drive-through all the time and having to actually walk.

Sound insulting? Sound untrue? Sound like the person has never even talked to a foreigner in Korea? Of course.

And for the same reason, your post, and hte posts like it, are complete crap.


Imagination and How Things Are are two entirely different things. And the "imagination" here isn't imagination, it's stereotype and bigotry.

If one were to truly imagine things, they'd use empathy and deductive reasoning, not stereotype. You know the empathy we expect and wish Koreans to have towards us.

I'd be quite rich if I had $10,000 for every time I've seen a Korean spit in an ashtray, in Korea. I think the purpose of this thread is to imagine taking a Korean, not Korean American, and putting them in a western nation. What is done in Korea that wouldn't fly in the west and vica versa.

One of my burnt into my psyche moments when I first arrived was seeing this beautiful Korean woman all dressed up for a night on the town hawk a loogie and spit into an ashtray at a galbi place. It was too funny. However, I don't see people do that as much as they used to.


As someone who lived in a town that had a constant influx of new Korean arrivals (basically a new bunch every uni semester) I can assure you that they are not like that. Koreans who move (tourists might be different) to the USA actually tend to look around and see how others act and try to blend in somewhat and are uber-self conscious.

First off 90% end up at a church within their first couple of weeks where smoking and drinking are absolutely verboten. They may smoke and drink privately (and often do, to excess) or have a casual beer with dinner, but they don't go out drinking like back home. Now that is definitely an annoyance for some, but this is in response to Korean Immigrant culture (distinctly different from Korean-American culture), at least in my town.

Put it this way, in Korean immi circles, you don't ask "Do you go to church?", you ask "What church do you go to?".

One of the really intimidating parts is not dealing with other foreigners, its dealing with other Koreans. You've got one group which was fabulously wealthy back home. You might just be normal/upper-middle class, but in your Bible study group or Korean friend circle in H.S. is the daughter of The Face Shop's CEO or the son of the Executive VP of Woori bank. Also you've got the Koreans who come over here and have "made it" and even if they were just middle class back home, are living in what would be a near-mansion in Korea, 2 brand new cars, golfing, etc. and some of them pull this off within a year or two. But you may have been at the same "level" back in Korea but you get there, for whatever reason can't get a good job, and you're working at a liquor store or dry cleaners while they're at Pfizer.

Actually I can think of one guy who stayed "typical ajosshi" back home and that was my ex-boss. Dude would regale us with such tales as "Last night I get so drunk, I see two lines while driving, so I put my hand over one eye and drive home safe" or "Last night I was so drunk, I try to park my car in my garage. It not fit.", shagging the Korean dry-cleaning ajumma two doors down from his joint, admitting to not being allowed back in Korea despite being quite wealthy, stories of business meetings and women/booze back in Korea, Jury-rigging repairs and dodging regulations, ignoring no-smoking signs, and more.

Unlike church-going Koreans, he was blunt and openly bigoted and nakedly greedy and cursed rgularly. And unlike them, he was one of the few who worked with minimum-wage people and a large number of minorities, ex-cons, rednecks, ghetto types, and druggies. He was able to relate surprisingly well, because while he may have been bigoted and greedy, he was bluntly honest and didn't play games, which people in that situation respected more than some false PC charm. Dealing with people on the bottom end of society, they could get frustrated and smoke in the back of the store (poor people smoke and hate smoking bans. They spit too) or call in drunk or even get busted for drugs and he'd understand. And he actually admitted to narcotics use in Korea-

"Did you ever do marijuana?" "Marijuana is that some sniff sniff?" NOOO Mr. Kim! "Oh, in that case no."

He didn't care much for brand names and appearances. Threw Christmas parties and was pretty charitable to his own employees, many of whom might as well have been on Maury, and was if anything too patient and generous with them.

The point of this rambling, overly-long post, is that things are not what you might assume on the surface. If you actually lived in a place and got in deep with the Korean immigrant community you'd realize that those things really do not match. And at the same time, that typical ajosshi guy might actually relate better to "real" Americans on a certain level, many of whom hold indifferent attitudes towards the law, smoking, drinking, and PC-views.
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hiamnotcool



Joined: 06 Feb 2012

PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
Smithington wrote:
- Having their drivers license suspended, and they've only been in the country a week.
- Getting thrown out of a restaurant and all they did was drool a lugie into the ashtray.
- Being confronted for sneezing on people, cutting in line, bumping into people, staring at black peole, etc..
- Being invited to Mr. Smith's house for dinner and never being invited back.

If I had ten thousand dollars for every time these happened I'd still be poor.

Seriously did you actually interact with Korean people back home or are you basing this on ridiculous stereotypes?

How would you feel if some Korean wrote

"Things Foreigners get annoyed by in Korea"

-There's no pizza and hamburgers at every lunch.
-Having an Asian person as a boss
-Not being able to riot over a sporting event
-Not having a gun to shoot
-Not having everyone speak English
-Not being able to go to the drive-through all the time and having to actually walk.

Sound insulting? Sound untrue? Sound like the person has never even talked to a foreigner in Korea? Of course.

And for the same reason, your post, and hte posts like it, are complete crap.


It doesn't really sound untrue or insulting. On average the foreigners I meet complain about 3/6 of the things on that list. I personally wish I could shoot a gun, communicate with everyone in English, and use the drive through. Not being able to do those things does annoy me at times. If a Korean person said that to me I would probably laugh and tell him he would miss kimchi and squat toilets, and he would probably laugh at that too. You see, Koreans have a sense of humor. I think it's about time for you to take a break from the superhero business and let some else don a costume and defend all things Korean for a little while. You are really starting to lose it.
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NilesQ



Joined: 27 Nov 2006

PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steelrails wrote:
NilesQ wrote:
Steelrails wrote:
Smithington wrote:
- Having their drivers license suspended, and they've only been in the country a week.
- Getting thrown out of a restaurant and all they did was drool a lugie into the ashtray.
- Being confronted for sneezing on people, cutting in line, bumping into people, staring at black peole, etc..
- Being invited to Mr. Smith's house for dinner and never being invited back.

If I had ten thousand dollars for every time these happened I'd still be poor.

Seriously did you actually interact with Korean people back home or are you basing this on ridiculous stereotypes?

How would you feel if some Korean wrote

"Things Foreigners get annoyed by in Korea"

-There's no pizza and hamburgers at every lunch.
-Having an Asian person as a boss
-Not being able to riot over a sporting event
-Not having a gun to shoot
-Not having everyone speak English
-Not being able to go to the drive-through all the time and having to actually walk.

Sound insulting? Sound untrue? Sound like the person has never even talked to a foreigner in Korea? Of course.

And for the same reason, your post, and hte posts like it, are complete crap.


Imagination and How Things Are are two entirely different things. And the "imagination" here isn't imagination, it's stereotype and bigotry.

If one were to truly imagine things, they'd use empathy and deductive reasoning, not stereotype. You know the empathy we expect and wish Koreans to have towards us.

I'd be quite rich if I had $10,000 for every time I've seen a Korean spit in an ashtray, in Korea. I think the purpose of this thread is to imagine taking a Korean, not Korean American, and putting them in a western nation. What is done in Korea that wouldn't fly in the west and vica versa.

One of my burnt into my psyche moments when I first arrived was seeing this beautiful Korean woman all dressed up for a night on the town hawk a loogie and spit into an ashtray at a galbi place. It was too funny. However, I don't see people do that as much as they used to.


As someone who lived in a town that had a constant influx of new Korean arrivals (basically a new bunch every uni semester) I can assure you that they are not like that. Koreans who move (tourists might be different) to the USA actually tend to look around and see how others act and try to blend in somewhat and are uber-self conscious.

First off 90% end up at a church within their first couple of weeks where smoking and drinking are absolutely verboten. They may smoke and drink privately (and often do, to excess) or have a casual beer with dinner, but they don't go out drinking like back home. Now that is definitely an annoyance for some, but this is in response to Korean Immigrant culture (distinctly different from Korean-American culture), at least in my town.

Put it this way, in Korean immi circles, you don't ask "Do you go to church?", you ask "What church do you go to?".

One of the really intimidating parts is not dealing with other foreigners, its dealing with other Koreans. You've got one group which was fabulously wealthy back home. You might just be normal/upper-middle class, but in your Bible study group or Korean friend circle in H.S. is the daughter of The Face Shop's CEO or the son of the Executive VP of Woori bank. Also you've got the Koreans who come over here and have "made it" and even if they were just middle class back home, are living in what would be a near-mansion in Korea, 2 brand new cars, golfing, etc. and some of them pull this off within a year or two. But you may have been at the same "level" back in Korea but you get there, for whatever reason can't get a good job, and you're working at a liquor store or dry cleaners while they're at Pfizer.

Actually I can think of one guy who stayed "typical ajosshi" back home and that was my ex-boss. Dude would regale us with such tales as "Last night I get so drunk, I see two lines while driving, so I put my hand over one eye and drive home safe" or "Last night I was so drunk, I try to park my car in my garage. It not fit.", shagging the Korean dry-cleaning ajumma two doors down from his joint, admitting to not being allowed back in Korea despite being quite wealthy, stories of business meetings and women/booze back in Korea, Jury-rigging repairs and dodging regulations, ignoring no-smoking signs, and more.

Unlike church-going Koreans, he was blunt and openly bigoted and nakedly greedy and cursed rgularly. And unlike them, he was one of the few who worked with minimum-wage people and a large number of minorities, ex-cons, rednecks, ghetto types, and druggies. He was able to relate surprisingly well, because while he may have been bigoted and greedy, he was bluntly honest and didn't play games, which people in that situation respected more than some false PC charm. Dealing with people on the bottom end of society, they could get frustrated and smoke in the back of the store (poor people smoke and hate smoking bans. They spit too) or call in drunk or even get busted for drugs and he'd understand. And he actually admitted to narcotics use in Korea-

"Did you ever do marijuana?" "Marijuana is that some sniff sniff?" NOOO Mr. Kim! "Oh, in that case no."

He didn't care much for brand names and appearances. Threw Christmas parties and was pretty charitable to his own employees, many of whom might as well have been on Maury, and was if anything too patient and generous with them.

The point of this rambling, overly-long post, is that things are not what you might assume on the surface. If you actually lived in a place and got in deep with the Korean immigrant community you'd realize that those things really do not match. And at the same time, that typical ajosshi guy might actually relate better to "real" Americans on a certain level, many of whom hold indifferent attitudes towards the law, smoking, drinking, and PC-views.


I have lived in Korea for 6 years and now live in a major North American city. Tons of Koreans through here, and I volunteer at the local Korean Settlement Association at the YMCA teaching English to new citizens and helping them with the challenges of adapting to a new culture. I also study Korean at classes put on by new citizens and socialize with them quite regularly. Is that "in deep" enough with the Korean immigrant community for you?

The people who emmigrate from Korea aren't Korean in the sense we use the word to describe everything that's wrong with the "Korean" mentality. The truly "Korean" Koreans wouldn't leave Korea! This is more of a social class issue than a cultural or national one. As in every country, the "lower", less wealthy, classes are often less refined socially. Their manners and behavior often don't fly in their own country. The class of Korean going abroad now are wealthy and educated for the most part. No refugees coming out of ROK like there were in the 50s, 60s and 70s. Many of the Koreans I meet have "bought" their citizenship beginning with investment visas and residency status. They arent the poor huddled masses anymore.

This exercise was more a game of juxtaposing Korean "norms" against a Western backdrop and/or Western shortcommings against Korean expectations. You seem to take great offense everytime someone says anything you percieve as negative about Korea, Koreans, or their traditions.
It is fairly common to see people spitting in ashtrays in Korea. You can deny it if you like, but that doesn't make it untrue. They don't do it in the West because, really, when's the last time you saw an ashtray in North America?!!
I spit in ashtrays when I lived in Korea. When in Rome and all that. I wouldn't do it at home though. Koreans catch on too. They start doing things they'd never do in Korea when they're here: befriend Japanese people, question the authority of elders, girls smoking in the streets......
People are more a product of their environment.
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joelove



Joined: 12 May 2011

PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"They don't do it in the West because, really, when's the last time you saw an ashtray in North America?!! "

Was thinking the same thing.
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jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NilesQ wrote:
girls smoking in the streets....

A lot of young girls smoking on the street these days, even in small towns in Gyeongsang.
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catman



Joined: 18 Jul 2004

PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disrespectful Kids.
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Scorpion



Joined: 15 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

catman wrote:
Disrespectful Kids.
Have you even been to Korea? Have you spent so much as ten minutes in a Korean classroom? I've never met such rude disrespectful kids in my life.
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decibalsrising



Joined: 12 Sep 2012
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scorpion wrote:
catman wrote:
Disrespectful Kids.
Have you even been to Korea? Have you spent so much as ten minutes in a Korean classroom? I've never met such rude disrespectful kids in my life.


TOTALLY diferent situation! Also the teacher in control could be partly to blame as well if they are able to be out of control

Try telling some western teenagers on the sidewalk to stop smoking etc.

You can they bet they wont bow to you and slightly apologize. Youre lucky if you dont get a bottle threw at you Rolling Eyes
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cheezsteakwit



Joined: 12 Oct 2011
Location: There & back again.

PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

decibalsrising wrote:
Scorpion wrote:
catman wrote:
Disrespectful Kids.
Have you even been to Korea? Have you spent so much as ten minutes in a Korean classroom? I've never met such rude disrespectful kids in my life.


TOTALLY diferent situation! Also the teacher in control could be partly to blame as well if they are able to be out of control

Try telling some western teenagers on the sidewalk to stop smoking etc.

You can they bet they wont bow to you and slightly apologize. Youre lucky if you dont get a bottle threw at you Rolling Eyes


You must not be from America , Scorpion. "Never been to the ghetto ?!?!? ... you don't wanna go the ghetto!"

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/10/10/teen-arrested-in-sucker-punching-teacher-in-pittsburgh-alley/

Having taught 2 years in a Philly inner city high school, I thought I died and went to heaven when I arrived at my all boys high school here in Korea. I've had ZERO problems with discipline / respect.
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Scorpion



Joined: 15 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

decibalsrising wrote:
Scorpion wrote:
catman wrote:
Disrespectful Kids.
Have you even been to Korea? Have you spent so much as ten minutes in a Korean classroom? I've never met such rude disrespectful kids in my life.
TOTALLY diferent situation! Also the teacher in control could be partly to blame as well if they are able to be out of control Try telling some western teenagers on the sidewalk to stop smoking etc. You can they bet they wont bow to you and slightly apologize. Youre lucky if you dont get a bottle threw at you Rolling Eyes
What are you telling teenagers on the sidewalk to stop smoking for? How is it any of your business? I'd tell you to piss off too. That doesn't make me disrespectful. It makes you disrespectful for sticking your nose in where it doesn't belong.

And no kid on the street back home has ever shown me as much disrespect as I've regularly witnessed from groups of boys on the street here in Korea.
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