Site Search:
 
TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International
Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index Korean Job Discussion Forums
"The Internet's Meeting Place for ESL/EFL Teachers from Around the World!"
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

gym workout regimes
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 12, 13, 14 ... 45, 46, 47  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Off-Topic Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jyang486 wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
silkhighway wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Bah, you can do squats twice a day, 7 days a week if you want. Any program is easy if you do it half-assed, using low weights only. I'm not huge on these fitness guru-type workouts. You do what works for you and, most importantly, what you enjoy doing. As long as you don't get injured, it's all good...Just don't do it half-assed. Wink


I completely agree the best workout is the one that keeps you coming back for more. SS and SL are not suitable for everyone nor are they compatible with everyone's goals.

However, I don't think it's fair to brand SS and SL as fitness guru workouts. Despite the brand and slick marketing package the SL guy has, these are actually old school barbell strength training programs used by coaches for decades, and they don't preach anything radical. Focus on key compound exercises, nail down proper technique, progress linearly until you can't progress anymore, and eat lots of food.
Ok, let me reword that: I'm not big on fitness fads, particularly those that are heavily marketed.


Until you really know what is right for you, these foundation workouts are key. Just because they are heavily marketed doesn't make them worthless. It takes months, if not years, for beginners to figure out what truly works for them. During this period of learning, programs that preach the importance of consistency, discipline, and proper techniques are incredibly important. And that's where these programs like Starting Strength and Stronglifts come in.


Look, first time I set foot in a gym was in the '70s, started training in the '80s. I don't buy into fads because I've seen so many of them come and go. Months or years for beginners to figure out what works for them? Please. I gained 6 pounds the first week I started training by doing dead-lifts, chin-ups, and shoulder presses. Yes, do basic mass building exercises when you start, it's that simple. No need to waste 49.99$ on some book and DVDs to know that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
silkhighway



Joined: 24 Oct 2010
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

12ax7 wrote:
Jyang486 wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
silkhighway wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Bah, you can do squats twice a day, 7 days a week if you want. Any program is easy if you do it half-assed, using low weights only. I'm not huge on these fitness guru-type workouts. You do what works for you and, most importantly, what you enjoy doing. As long as you don't get injured, it's all good...Just don't do it half-assed. Wink


I completely agree the best workout is the one that keeps you coming back for more. SS and SL are not suitable for everyone nor are they compatible with everyone's goals.

However, I don't think it's fair to brand SS and SL as fitness guru workouts. Despite the brand and slick marketing package the SL guy has, these are actually old school barbell strength training programs used by coaches for decades, and they don't preach anything radical. Focus on key compound exercises, nail down proper technique, progress linearly until you can't progress anymore, and eat lots of food.
Ok, let me reword that: I'm not big on fitness fads, particularly those that are heavily marketed.


Until you really know what is right for you, these foundation workouts are key. Just because they are heavily marketed doesn't make them worthless. It takes months, if not years, for beginners to figure out what truly works for them. During this period of learning, programs that preach the importance of consistency, discipline, and proper techniques are incredibly important. And that's where these programs like Starting Strength and Stronglifts come in.


Look, first time I set foot in a gym was in the '70s, started training in the '80s. I don't buy into fads because I've seen so many of them come and go. Months or years for beginners to figure out what works for them? Please. I gained 6 pounds the first week I started training by doing dead-lifts, chin-ups, and shoulder presses. Yes, do basic mass building exercises when you start, it's that simple. No need to waste 49.99$ on some book and DVDs to know that.


I think we agree! I realize I'm closer to lifting weights for 30 days than 30 years..I don't claim to know a lot, I don't. I'm also not a Starting Strength fanboy. I just brought it up because I found it a useful starting point. It was precisely the emphasis on hard work and discipline over fancy technique or knowledge that attracted me to it.

For someone, who's in a situation like me, new to weight-training and training by themselves ,willing to put some effort into it, why not look into a program like Starting Strength? Its free to check out the website and wiki, read the discussion boards. Maybe you might decide to go a step further and buy the book, or maybe not. It doesn't hurt to check it out though.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
12ax7



Joined: 07 Nov 2009

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

silkhighway wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Jyang486 wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
silkhighway wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Bah, you can do squats twice a day, 7 days a week if you want. Any program is easy if you do it half-assed, using low weights only. I'm not huge on these fitness guru-type workouts. You do what works for you and, most importantly, what you enjoy doing. As long as you don't get injured, it's all good...Just don't do it half-assed. Wink


I completely agree the best workout is the one that keeps you coming back for more. SS and SL are not suitable for everyone nor are they compatible with everyone's goals.

However, I don't think it's fair to brand SS and SL as fitness guru workouts. Despite the brand and slick marketing package the SL guy has, these are actually old school barbell strength training programs used by coaches for decades, and they don't preach anything radical. Focus on key compound exercises, nail down proper technique, progress linearly until you can't progress anymore, and eat lots of food.
Ok, let me reword that: I'm not big on fitness fads, particularly those that are heavily marketed.


Until you really know what is right for you, these foundation workouts are key. Just because they are heavily marketed doesn't make them worthless. It takes months, if not years, for beginners to figure out what truly works for them. During this period of learning, programs that preach the importance of consistency, discipline, and proper techniques are incredibly important. And that's where these programs like Starting Strength and Stronglifts come in.


Look, first time I set foot in a gym was in the '70s, started training in the '80s. I don't buy into fads because I've seen so many of them come and go. Months or years for beginners to figure out what works for them? Please. I gained 6 pounds the first week I started training by doing dead-lifts, chin-ups, and shoulder presses. Yes, do basic mass building exercises when you start, it's that simple. No need to waste 49.99$ on some book and DVDs to know that.


I think we agree! I realize I'm closer to lifting weights for 30 days than 30 years..I don't claim to know a lot, I don't. I'm also not a Starting Strength fanboy. I just brought it up because I found it a useful starting point. It was precisely the emphasis on hard work and discipline over fancy technique or knowledge that attracted me to it.

For someone, who's in a situation like me, new to weight-training and training by themselves ,willing to put some effort into it, why not look into a program like Starting Strength? Its free to check out the website and wiki, read the discussion boards. Maybe you might decide to go a step further and buy the book, or maybe not. It doesn't hurt to check it out though.


Ah, so it's free and you're a beginner, then that's fine. But, again, for now stick with the basics. You want to build up your strength without getting injured. With a bit of experience, you'll be able to recognize when you've had too much salt or not enough protein on your work out days, or maybe when you haven't had enough sleep. You'll become attuned with your body, you'll know when you must lift heavy or take it easy.

Here's a bit of an advanced technique for you, but it's something which has always worked for me. It's called a reverse pyramid. Plenty of videos on Youtube explaining this. Basically, you warm up by doing about 5 sets of low weight, low reps (some do 3 or 4 reps, I'll do 8 and then 5 as I get closer to my top set), adding weight to each new set and resting in between. Once you've reached your top set, the heaviest you can lift for 5-10 reps, reverse the process without resting in between changes. Remove 10-20% of the weight at a time and do as many reps as you can before moving to a lower weight. Try it and you'll see that by the end, you'll be shaking trying to move a ridiculous light weight, and you'll have an amazing pump.

But, most often, I'll just use a drop set as my last one. It's kind of like a reverse pyramid, but simpler. The results are essentially the same.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drop_set
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This came up in another thread, and it got me thinking..

nautilus wrote:

Physical force, or the potent threat thereof, is the foundation of all authority on this planet. If this were not so, then governments would not invest in armies and police forces, and you would not work out and have a musclebound superhero as a rolemodel.


Why do you workout?

This person obviously feels that I (or all ppl who work out??) do so to be physically intimidating.

It's funny because just the other day, a guy I was training with admitted this exact same thing to me - "I want to get bigger so ppl won't mess with me"

I've never really thought of it like that. I've always considered myself more of a 'sculptor' in the gym - I see things I want to change, and I train towards changing them. Sometimes I lift heavy to acheive that, sometimes I lift nearly nothing. It's not all that important to me - especially as I get older.



So, I'm curious - why do you train?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fermentation



Joined: 22 Jun 2009

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
This came up in another thread, and it got me thinking..

Why do you workout?

This person obviously feels that I (or all ppl who work out??) do so to be physically intimidating.

It's funny because just the other day, a guy I was training with admitted this exact same thing to me - "I want to get bigger so ppl won't mess with me"

I've never really thought of it like that. I've always considered myself more of a 'sculptor' in the gym - I see things I want to change, and I train towards changing them. Sometimes I lift heavy to acheive that, sometimes I lift nearly nothing. It's not all that important to me - especially as I get older.

So, I'm curious - why do you train?


I think that's kind of silly in the modern adult world. But I'm a small dude so no matter how much I lift, I will never get big and look intimidating. Also anybody decent at martial arts or fighting isn't going to be daunted by an opponent's size alone. Is the guy still in highschool?

I train mainly to win fights and for health. I also think lifting is a form of hobby. It requires knowledge, dedication and focus. It definitely has a meditative quality about it. At least it does for me when I'm trying to concentrate every part of my being for a max deadlift. It also just makes you feel better when you lift a weight you weren't able to do in the past. That feeling of accomplishment makes living a little more enjoyable.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jyang486



Joined: 25 Nov 2011

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

12ax7 wrote:
Jyang486 wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
silkhighway wrote:
12ax7 wrote:
Bah, you can do squats twice a day, 7 days a week if you want. Any program is easy if you do it half-assed, using low weights only. I'm not huge on these fitness guru-type workouts. You do what works for you and, most importantly, what you enjoy doing. As long as you don't get injured, it's all good...Just don't do it half-assed. Wink


I completely agree the best workout is the one that keeps you coming back for more. SS and SL are not suitable for everyone nor are they compatible with everyone's goals.

However, I don't think it's fair to brand SS and SL as fitness guru workouts. Despite the brand and slick marketing package the SL guy has, these are actually old school barbell strength training programs used by coaches for decades, and they don't preach anything radical. Focus on key compound exercises, nail down proper technique, progress linearly until you can't progress anymore, and eat lots of food.
Ok, let me reword that: I'm not big on fitness fads, particularly those that are heavily marketed.


Until you really know what is right for you, these foundation workouts are key. Just because they are heavily marketed doesn't make them worthless. It takes months, if not years, for beginners to figure out what truly works for them. During this period of learning, programs that preach the importance of consistency, discipline, and proper techniques are incredibly important. And that's where these programs like Starting Strength and Stronglifts come in.


Look, first time I set foot in a gym was in the '70s, started training in the '80s. I don't buy into fads because I've seen so many of them come and go. Months or years for beginners to figure out what works for them? Please. I gained 6 pounds the first week I started training by doing dead-lifts, chin-ups, and shoulder presses. Yes, do basic mass building exercises when you start, it's that simple. No need to waste 49.99$ on some book and DVDs to know that.


Oh, by heavily marketed you meant you have to pay for them. Like another poster says, these aren't paid programs. They are widely known because they are free programs that produce proven results. It's good that you gained results from the start, but not all beginners know what types of workouts to do, i.e. deadlifts/overhead presses, so that's why I advocate following these starting training programs. When I first started and had no idea what to do, I did random things that my friends would tell me to do. I figured because they've been lifting for some time, they'd know what would be best for me. Although I got some results, lost some weight and gained some muscle, it was pretty much a huge waste of time and effort. When I dropped everything they told me to do, and just started Stronglifts, the results in 3 months were more significant than the results of the year I spent following and listening to my friends. So now whenever any newbies come to me for advice, and I know we won't be able to train consistently together, I just tell them to look up Starting Strength or Stronglifts because they are perfect for beginners.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
actionjackson



Joined: 30 Dec 2007
Location: Any place I'm at

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ac4_1354227642
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Yahoo Messenger
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

actionjackson wrote:
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=ac4_1354227642


Says the video has been removed - got another link?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
why do you train?


To offset the effects of dwaeji kalbi. Wink

So I was in the gym 5 days this week, 1hr each day. M - upper body, T - lower body, W - yoga to stretch out, T - upper, F - lower. Friday half way thru workout I was like man I am ready for the weekend; lounge around doing nothing. Felt trashed, but in a good way.

Friday night bumped into a girl I know. She looked at me quizzically for a moment and then said "you look more handsomer". Haha gotta like that.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good stuff, KN. How did you find that schedule worked for ya?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's freakin hard cause of all the kalbi I've eaten here!

But I can tell its going to get results. After two days rest each muscle group feels ready to go again. I work out mornings and make an early lunch after workout the largest meal of the day (as the other poster suggested). That has really helped replenish and be ready for the next day. Probably will fine tune after a few more weeks experience, but so far feels like a challenging but doable pace.

So starting off you guys suggest lower reps of higher weight? Just to put on some mass upfront, and then tone it up later? I've been doing 3 sets of 8-12 for most of the exercises. Maybe I should up the weight a bit next week and make it 5-8 x 3?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, I'm not a big fan of low reps/heavier weight for guys starting out. A lot of time, ppl haven't gotten the proper form down, and there's a greater chance of injury the heavier you get.

IMO, focus on the form first. Make sure you're doing things right for 8-12 reps. Get that down for a while, then consider which direction you want to head.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Captain Corea



Joined: 28 Feb 2005
Location: Seoul

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just out of curiosity, I asked over on bodybuilding.com whether people lift to be intimidating or not. It's interesting, because usually that site is full of test driven responses, but even over there, it's not really the main thing the guys talk about... might be a side effect, but I don't think many people train with that as their main focus.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
silkhighway



Joined: 24 Oct 2010
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:



So, I'm curious - why do you train?


I'm just training to stay in shape and gain more strength.The reason I would say I'm "training" rather than "exercising" is because I do want to see improvement, and I tend to do better when I commit myself to something rather than dip in it.

However, I'm very realistic about my goals. I probably eat more food now, but I'm not calorie counting and I'm likely not eating sufficient calories and protein content to gain weight. Without gaining weight, I'm going to plateau sooner. Still, I enjoy lifting weights and I enjoy going for my run. Yoga class feels amazing after a good run or gym session. I'll keep it up as long as that's the case.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Captain Corea wrote:
Personally, I'm not a big fan of low reps/heavier weight for guys starting out. A lot of time, ppl haven't gotten the proper form down, and there's a greater chance of injury the heavier you get.


Excellent, that's actually exactly why I've been doing 8-12s. I feel like if I put on bucket-loads of weight I'm just going to cheat using sloppy form.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Korean Job Discussion Forums Forum Index -> Off-Topic Forum All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 12, 13, 14 ... 45, 46, 47  Next
Page 13 of 47

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


This page is maintained by the one and only Dave Sperling.
Contact Dave's ESL Cafe
Copyright © 2013 Dave Sperling. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group

TEFL International Supports Dave's ESL Cafe
TEFL Courses, TESOL Course, English Teaching Jobs - TEFL International