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Habits you've picked up in Korea
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nautilus



Joined: 26 Nov 2005
Location: Je jump, Tu jump, oui jump!

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:12 am    Post subject: Habits you've picked up in Korea Reply with quote

I tend to walk on the road a lot. Its much less cluttered than the sidewalk.

You?
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John Stamos jr.



Joined: 07 Oct 2012
Location: Namsan

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always had a car when I lived in the US, and still have one there, so I've never relied on public transportation outside of when I was traveling in foreign countries. However, I commute to and from work here.

I would never have considered getting even remotely physical with a grandma for a seat on the subway before I came here, but with my 30 minute subway ride, and some of the BS that goes on here, I'll fight an ajumma for a seat if necessary. Just today, at a transfer station, a standing ajumma and I knew this girl was getting off; I had been there the longest and set up a solid blocking position against the door side grip rail that would allow her to get up and move in the right direction as I snagged it... but this sneaky ajumma tried to duck under my arm and take it. I pinned her against the grip rail and successfully cut her off, but the seat beside that one opened up, so we ended up sitting next to each other.

And, what do you know, she got off at the next friggin' stop, while I had at least 6 more stops to go. So, that's one habit I've picked up: fighting with old people for seats on the subway. And, not taking crap from entitled old Korean people in general. I was walking home from work a few months ago and some ajumma street gang murmured some "blah blah kojangee" tripe underneath their breath as they laughed at me, and I stopped and gave them a "Sheepal torai ajumma" response. Oh... it felt goooood.
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JustinC



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Location: We Are The World!

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't take the subway regularly so that isn't something I'd do. I do stand near those seated and will take a seat if there isn't an old bag standing nearby, but if there's a fossil hanging around wanting a seat I'll let them take it unless I'm really tired. Some of them are actually nice old farts, but some are twisted old f***ers.

When I am on the subway here I've started cruising cars for a quieter one if mine's packed. I've noticed this odd phenomenon here that some cars will be bursting and others have seats free. I only noticed when a train (I'd just squeezed off) was leaving and some cars weren't half as crowded as the one I'd suffered. As an added bonus you get to check out more tail.
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Dodge7



Joined: 21 Oct 2011

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Stamos jr. wrote:
I always had a car when I lived in the US, and still have one there, so I've never relied on public transportation outside of when I was traveling in foreign countries. However, I commute to and from work here.

I would never have considered getting even remotely physical with a grandma for a seat on the subway before I came here, but with my 30 minute subway ride, and some of the BS that goes on here, I'll fight an ajumma for a seat if necessary. Just today, at a transfer station, a standing ajumma and I knew this girl was getting off; I had been there the longest and set up a solid blocking position against the door side grip rail that would allow her to get up and move in the right direction as I snagged it... but this sneaky ajumma tried to duck under my arm and take it. I pinned her against the grip rail and successfully cut her off, but the seat beside that one opened up, so we ended up sitting next to each other.

And, what do you know, she got off at the next friggin' stop, while I had at least 6 more stops to go. So, that's one habit I've picked up: fighting with old people for seats on the subway. And, not taking crap from entitled old Korean people in general. I was walking home from work a few months ago and some ajumma street gang murmured some "blah blah kojangee" tripe underneath their breath as they laughed at me, and I stopped and gave them a "Sheepal torai ajumma" response. Oh... it felt goooood.

You sound like a slimy type of guy. Let the "grandma" have your seat for God's sake. Geez. And "pinning" women up against a rail for a seat? Wow, no wonder she got off the next stop--it wasn't her destination she probably couldn't stand to sit by you and wanted to get on the next train so she didn't have to be in your presence.
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Dodge7



Joined: 21 Oct 2011

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JustinC wrote:
I don't take the subway regularly so that isn't something I'd do. I do stand near those seated and will take a seat if there isn't an old bag standing nearby, but if there's a fossil hanging around wanting a seat I'll let them take it unless I'm really tired. Some of them are actually nice old farts, but some are twisted old f***ers.

When I am on the subway here I've started cruising cars for a quieter one if mine's packed. I've noticed this odd phenomenon here that some cars will be bursting and others have seats free. I only noticed when a train (I'd just squeezed off) was leaving and some cars weren't half as crowded as the one I'd suffered. As an added bonus you get to check out more tail.

Another clueless jackwad. I don't care if you just ran a marathon--those seats are not for you and even if you do sit in them you should give them up if an old person gets on and wants to sit down.
Where do you guys learn this stuff? Must be taught in your homes growing up. Sad.
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cj1976



Joined: 26 Oct 2005

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Giving your seat to someone who needs it more than you is basic manners. I get really annoyed with young Korean people who pretend they can't see elderly people or pregnant women getting on the bus/subway. That's when the Confucianist mentality flies out of the window, and you can see how selfish some people really are.
Anyway, a really bad habit I have picked up here is smoking. I was an ex-smoker when I came here, but the steady supply of alcohol and the low price of cigarettes put an end to that.
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toby99



Joined: 28 Aug 2009
Location: Dong-Incheon-by-the-sea, South Korea

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alcoholism, smoking, spitting.
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cj1976



Joined: 26 Oct 2005

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Farting loudly in public - but hey, when in Rome!
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JustinC



Joined: 10 Mar 2012
Location: We Are The World!

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Another clueless jackwad. I don't care if you just ran a marathon--those seats are not for you and even if you do sit in them you should give them up if an old person gets on and wants to sit down.
Where do you guys learn this stuff? Must be taught in your homes growing up. Sad.


Thanks dad. Rolling Eyes
I don't sit on the seats that are specifically for elderly, even if they're empty.

Another habit I have is clubbing baby seals and stealing candy from babies Laughing

The righteous indignation is strong in this thread.
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Zackback



Joined: 05 Nov 2010
Location: Kyungbuk

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Eating raw garlic...tons of it.
2. Bowing to people.
3. Taking off my shoes when entering indoors.
4. Taking my time when eating meals....an old girlfriend told me I eat too fast.
5. Being a whole lot nicer and respectful to women. Back where I came from I just avoided them and their stupidity - sometimes calling them out on it. In Korea I'm always open to meet more of the ladies. A good habit "pick up" goes along way with "picking up" chicks. Trust me on this.
6. This place has taught me to always be prepared to teach. Sometimes I am just thrown into a classroom without a book and am told to "Teach!". This greatly improved my conversational expertise...which of course also improved things for me in #5.
One hand washes the other hand...both hands wash the face.
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newb



Joined: 27 Aug 2012
Location: Korea

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cj1976 wrote:
Farting loudly in public - but hey, when in Rome!


+1

Farting, horking, and slurping. I'm afraid that I'll still do it when back home in a year or two from now. Embarassed
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Scorpion



Joined: 15 Apr 2012

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Picking my nose on the subway, rolling it up into a ball and flicking it onto the floor. Totally oblivious to onlookers I go back for seconds. When done I wipe my hand on the subway seat. Very Happy

Oh, yeah. That's not me. Just something I see basically everytime I take the subway.

Cursing idiots under my breath twenty times a day. That's something I never did back home.
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premiummince



Joined: 23 Jan 2010

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dodge7 wrote:
John Stamos jr. wrote:
I always had a car when I lived in the US, and still have one there, so I've never relied on public transportation outside of when I was traveling in foreign countries. However, I commute to and from work here.

I would never have considered getting even remotely physical with a grandma for a seat on the subway before I came here, but with my 30 minute subway ride, and some of the BS that goes on here, I'll fight an ajumma for a seat if necessary. Just today, at a transfer station, a standing ajumma and I knew this girl was getting off; I had been there the longest and set up a solid blocking position against the door side grip rail that would allow her to get up and move in the right direction as I snagged it... but this sneaky ajumma tried to duck under my arm and take it. I pinned her against the grip rail and successfully cut her off, but the seat beside that one opened up, so we ended up sitting next to each other.

And, what do you know, she got off at the next friggin' stop, while I had at least 6 more stops to go. So, that's one habit I've picked up: fighting with old people for seats on the subway. And, not taking crap from entitled old Korean people in general. I was walking home from work a few months ago and some ajumma street gang murmured some "blah blah kojangee" tripe underneath their breath as they laughed at me, and I stopped and gave them a "Sheepal torai ajumma" response. Oh... it felt goooood.

You sound like a slimy type of guy. Let the "grandma" have your seat for God's sake. Geez. And "pinning" women up against a rail for a seat? Wow, no wonder she got off the next stop--it wasn't her destination she probably couldn't stand to sit by you and wanted to get on the next train so she didn't have to be in your presence.


I gotta agree. That's pretty poor behaviour no matter where you are.
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Stamos jr. wrote:
I would never have considered getting even remotely physical with a grandma for a seat on the subway before I came here, but with my 30 minute subway ride, and some of the BS that goes on here, I'll fight an ajumma for a seat if necessary. Just today, at a transfer station, a standing ajumma and I knew this girl was getting off; I had been there the longest and set up a solid blocking position against the door side grip rail that would allow her to get up and move in the right direction as I snagged it... but this sneaky ajumma tried to duck under my arm and take it. I pinned her against the grip rail and successfully cut her off, but the seat beside that one opened up, so we ended up sitting next to each other.


Hmm I wonder why foreign English teachers have the reputation they do here? Idea
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Koharski
Mod Team
Mod Team


Joined: 20 Jul 2009

PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually a good idea for a thread. Too bad some on here take any oppotunity for pot shots at Korea and/or Koreans, and cannot discuss topics in an adult fashion.

Koharski
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