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Lets settle this. Is Korean food "good for you?"
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoulman69 wrote:
Quote:
We already discussed this on another thread. The old people who are dying (people have to die in order to calculate this number) are the ones who fought wars and had a harder life.


Laughing
Which war was that? The Korean war? Or WW2? Most of the old people in our home countries fought in both these wars. I would think the Koreans should live longer considering they only fought in one.

If you're going to troll at least put some thought into it.


Disagree. Again, use common sense, obviously the old people here had a harder life than Americans. See in 3D.
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jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoulman69 wrote:
Quote:
We already discussed this on another thread. The old people who are dying (people have to die in order to calculate this number) are the ones who fought wars and had a harder life.


Laughing
Which war was that? The Korean war? Or WW2? Most of the old people in our home countries fought in both these wars. I would think the Koreans should live longer considering they only fought in one.

If you're going to troll at least put some thought into it.

Back then most people got discharged after one war. Not many fight two major wars.

Anyways, rudimentary living conditions does put a crink in your health. Up until the 80's most Koreans lived in pretty squalid conditions.
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Seoulman69



Joined: 14 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Disagree. Again, use common sense, obviously the old people here had a harder life than Americans. See in 3D.


America was not the only country in these wars. Try to think less like an ignorant kyopo.

Quote:
Anyways, rudimentary living conditions does put a crink in your health. Up until the 80's most Koreans lived in pretty squalid conditions.


Rationing continued years after WW2. Europe suffered severe bombing. The Japanese were nuked twice but still have the longest life expectancy. Are you honestly suggesting that Korean food prolongs peoples lives?
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highstreet



Joined: 13 Nov 2010

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoulman69 wrote:
Quote:

Korea has a high life expectancy


No it doesn't. The life expectancy in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia are all longer. Even the obese Americans only live one year less. Who told you Korea has a high life expectancy?


If the overall average life expectancy is 67.2 and Korea's is 78.6, one could comfortably say Korea has a high life expectancy. Never said it was the highest. And yeah, I realize other countries are higher. Rolling Eyes

If the 'obese' Americans (78.2) only live one year less, than Koreans (78.6), and the average for the UK is 80.1, NZ is 80.2, Canada is 80.7, which is a difference of about 2years, does the UK, NZ, Canada all have low life expectancy averages as well?

*This is all from wiki, so our numbers could be different
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jvalmer



Joined: 06 Jun 2003

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seoulman69 wrote:
Quote:
Anyways, rudimentary living conditions does put a crink in your health. Up until the 80's most Koreans lived in pretty squalid conditions.

Rationing continued years after WW2. Europe suffered severe bombing. The Japanese were nuked twice but still have the longest life expectancy. Are you honestly suggesting that Korean food prolongs peoples lives?

Got side-tracked from the real purpose of this thread. Apologies.

Anyways, not suggesting Korean food extends people's lives, but it ain't bad for you. As for the live expectancy thing, it's only a few years separating the top 50 countries. And the two nuclear bombs were on two cities and not really relevant in this life-expectancy debate. Actually most of what I've posted isn't really relevant... I think I'll stop now...

Anyways... continue on with this debate.
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Seoulman69



Joined: 14 Dec 2009

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If the overall average life expectancy is 67.2 and Korea's is 78.6, one could comfortably say Korea has a high life expectancy. Never said it was the highest. And yeah, I realize other countries are higher. Rolling Eyes

If the 'obese' Americans (78.2) only live one year less, than Koreans (78.6), and the average for the UK is 80.1, NZ is 80.2, Canada is 80.7, which is a difference of about 2years, does the UK, NZ, Canada all have low life expectancy averages as well?


I suppose it all comes down to who you are comparing Korea's life expectancy to. If you compare it to developing countries then yes I would say it is high. But overall it is not a high life expectancy by any means.

You then went on to say "low life expectancy" and phrased the question in a way that suggests I said that of Korean life expectancy. To clarify, I didn't.
What I object to is your post saying that Korea has a high life expectancy. Considering the wealth of Korea I would say their life expectancy is lower than I would expect.

Back on point - Korean food is no better for you than any other countries food. It's just another lie Koreans use to feel good about their country. See also life expectancy and crime rates.
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joelove



Joined: 12 May 2011

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 2:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The thread is not really about life expectancy, just wanted to throw out there something I heard recently regarding increasing average weight of people (American documentary, applies elsewhere too) and health problems. Some suggest a lot of people may not live to be as old as their parents.
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drydell



Joined: 01 Oct 2009

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 3:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peace Train wrote:
drydell wrote:
Bibimbap with 1 tablespoon of gochujang will put your salt intake up to about 500mg.. (about 1/4 daily recommended - no problem for a full meal)If there's dwenjang included -that would indeed put the sodium right up... just go careful with the guchujang there.. Crying or Very sad

Some of these links are all over the place with bibimbap ingredients though - one had 4 eggs in it! Shocked Many are westernized versions with tons of added nasties..


1st, which link was inaccurate? The first I posted was a "typical" Korean bibimbap with one egg (3000g of sodium, 43g of sugar, 265mg of cholesterol). The 2nd was slightly westernized but still with one egg and "she said you couldn’t get a more authentic bibimbap" according to the article. Again, sky high levels of sodium, sugar and cholesterol.

2nd, if you are making a meal at home, why on earth would you make something slightly less unhealthy instead of making something legitimately healthy? This baffles me. In the time it takes to make bibimbap you could make an awesome stir fry using olive oil (on low heat) or virgin coconut oil with fresh vegetables and lean protein sources (or a hundred other healthy, tasty alternatives).

Originally I thought this discussion related to school lunches or being in an area with few options and bibmimbap being the lesser of 15 evils. If you are making meals at home, why in holy hell would you spend time making something thats on par with a Big Mac nutrition wise and tastes like compost?


first link didn't list any ingedients for a start
http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/calories/korean-food-bi-bim-bap-1722876

second link article (did that pic of a bibimbap look familiar? - not to me)
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:_vOSht0d3xYJ:www.thestar.com/living/food/article/1252585---healthy-bibimbap-loaded-with-sodium+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca
included a bowel of miso in the nutrition stats - no wonder the sodium was so high! (see my previous post re dwenjang on this)

The allrecipies version had an extra tablespoon and a half of soy sauce and also added salt...

The sparkpeople site lists tons of different bibimbaps that either don't have the nutrition stats available or are all identical - seems very unreliable..

dailyburn tracker version also includes added soy sauce...


I happen to think the high sodium issue is important - and for all that Asia has traditionally got right in food - high sodium is something that they got wrong - and high levels of stroke and stomach cancer show why...
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g0t soymilk?



Joined: 19 Aug 2012

PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kimchininja i understand how your thought process works now: you think that because koreans are skinny (btw, they aren't all skinny) that they are healthier than fat americans (who are simultaneously obese and obsessed with health? w/e you say)... what alot of us are saying is that there is more to health than that.

try looking beneath the surface, i know it may be hard for you.
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silkhighway



Joined: 24 Oct 2010
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

KimchiNinja wrote:

Korean friend: "There are things that can not be responded to, because they are insane. Americans see in 2D, they can't back up and see in 3D like normal people".



Yeah, I'll call it something else, perspective. Dish by dish, is Korea food healthier than Western food? Maybe not. If you sit down and muck through meals at a galbi restaurant every night it would be no different than eating at a ribs shack.

What I do think is healthier is Korean's eating habits (but I also realize as Korea becomes more affluent these are changing.).

In Korea, most people:

- are ritualistic about their meals and don't skip them, especially lunch like many of my counterparts do in Canada.
- don't eat their meals while working, or while doing other things (less mindless eating)
- don't eat alone (which means they'll usually eat more slowly)
- most of the time eat small simple meals like rice, soup, a little meat or fish, and kimchi
- see fast food as a snack, not a meal replacement (meaning they'll eat less of it and not expect to be full)
- eat more vegetables, greens, and fish

As for bibimbap vs. The Big Mac, that's not at all a fair comparison. It would be more fair to compare bibimbap to something like a grilled chicken salad. At home, if you make them yourself, both dishes could be both filling and nutritional. At a restaurant where you have no idea how much added oils, sugar, and salt, both dishes can be the worst thing on the menu.
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NohopeSeriously



Joined: 17 Jan 2011
Location: The Christian Right-Wing Educational Republic of Korea

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

News Flash: every food is dangerous if not eaten properly.

Please. Let's just enjoy food based on our own preference and health.
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I were a betting man (which I am) and lifespans were securitized and available on the stock market for speculation (which they aren't), I'd go long KR and short US.

In the US you had people who grew up with a thing called exercise and natural food, and they are dying now but with the benefit of medical technology, which gives you your high ave life figure. When the new generation of processed food, no exercise, ADD, depression, drugs, starts dying, will it be at a higher age?

In KR you had people who grew up with good food, but a harder life, and now they still have good food, as well as medical technology and quality of life increases. So unless they go the way of McD (could happen), they live forever.

Of course my analysis could be screwed, need to wait for results.

But really life expectancy just came up as a way to try to quantify health, probably not that great of a metric.
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KimchiNinja



Joined: 01 May 2012
Location: Gangnam

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

g0t soymilk? wrote:
kimchininja i understand how your thought process works now: you think that because koreans are skinny (btw, they aren't all skinny) that they are healthier than fat americans (who are simultaneously obese and obsessed with health? w/e you say)


No, you do not understand my thought process. You just put big things into little boxes and call it done. But that's okay.
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aussieb



Joined: 08 Sep 2007
Location: Brisbane,Australia

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think probably the worst meal I ever had(nutritionally and tastewise) was at VIPs in Seoul.
I was looking for a tasty and filling Western style snack and settled on the "Club Sandwich" which is a very good & tasty snack in Australia. Probably not the healthiest food in the world but tasty indeed. The VIPs version was dipped in batter and deep fried, then sprinkled with icing sugar. I found it was not at all palatable and would be nutritionally deficient. Not a healthy option at all. I wouldn't recommend that item on the menu.
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zacacho



Joined: 21 Apr 2006

PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Korean food for me,,,is hella good...and good for you...now obviously if you are eatting a shit load of donuts in any country its not good...But I would say the average korean or korean family eats healthier than the average american (that could be my bias or guess...Now there are groovy organic outdoor markets in places like berkeley or your health food store in practically any good sized town or city...but in general I'd say korean food can be very healthy...obviously you have to watch out how much pork knuckle stew you eat or sam gip sar etc...but the variety of food is good and various snacks like gimbap you just can't find that sort of snack in the states...but like most responses say it depends what you eat....For me korean food is very good,,,I like the dog stew,,,raw horse....I think certain cultures have different things going for it...Korea,,,I'd say the food, cultural heritage, mountains, steam saunas....etc.. Also as a korean friend said,,,look its fresh and clean...talking about eatting with chopsticks and talking about the squid and sesame leaves...
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