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Poor Pay?
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northway



Joined: 05 Jul 2010

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:25 pm    Post subject: Re: From the op Reply with quote

BigMikeAbroad wrote:
This was in no way suppose to be it's in own thread, I somehow submitted it twice and didn't realize it created a new thread.

As for airfare. If I want to travel and decide to teach, many places do not pay for airfare. So including the cost of a round trip trans-pacific in your salary is fare I think.

E2 teachers get their income tax, or part of it, returned when they leave the country.

So $34,000 after taxes or a salary of about $50,000. Not going to make you rich but more than enough to pay bills, live comfortably and save a good chunk.

Groceries may be the same. Cigarettes are cheaper, transportation is cheaper, some food is cheaper. Gas may be more but how many expats drive in Korea?

Feel free to disagree. I spent a year in Seoul and saved around 10 grand. Of that around $4,500 was my final paycheck, severance and returned taxes. That includes loosing a hundred at the casino ever so often, going out a ton and impulsing buying. I wasn't making a point to try to save money.


I'm pretty sure the returned taxes are a thing of the past.

Groceries are about 1.5 times as expensive in Korea as they are where I am now. They're definitely not the same price.

You can still save pretty well on 2.2, for sure, but prices have been rising very fast.
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ttompatz



Joined: 05 Sep 2005
Location: Kwangju, South Korea

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

misher wrote:
And unless you're married, have Korean ancestry or just want to do everything illegally, after 5-6 years on the job that 2.2 million won will increase to what? 2.7? Pushing for more will most likely not get your contract renewed seeing that you are limited to one year contracts anyway.

No one is arguing that it isn't a bad deal if you are young and starting out. However there is little to no upward mobility unlike jobs back home if you just stick to your guns.


That needs to be looked at in a few ways.

At home you gain experience, improve your credentials and upgrade your skills.
Far too many here just ride the gravy train until they hit the siding and then wonder where they, how they got off the main track are and what can they do to get off the siding and back running again.

If you continue to improve your credentials and skills there are upward mobility options (in and out of Korea) and career choices to consider.

Teachers never get rich. Better get a job in boutique banking if that is your goal.

If you want a long term, reasonably stable industry (region wide) then EFL and teaching in general isn't bad.

Move from entry level EFL to university jobs (not always a profitable move and there certainly is a glass ceiling).

Move from entry level EFL to DOS positions (DELTA anyone).
Move into teacher training. (DELTA / DipT).

Move into working with publishers like Oxford, Cambridge, Pearson, etc.
(options vary from writing to editing, teacher training and workshop presenters).
Move from EFL to primary/secondary teaching then move farther up into admin positions.
Make some connections and move into consulting for or with the government or various other firms.

Return home and get teacher certified, become a corporate trainer, if you are entrepreneurial then open a language school for foreign students or recent immigrants.

EFL as a gap year or two is what it is.

If you want to go further then it will take some work but options and mobility do exist.

The good news is that, as long as you are willing to follow the money, there are always decent jobs to be had with the ability to live well, save for the future and enjoy your work.

.
.
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edwardcatflap



Joined: 22 Mar 2009

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
That needs to be looked at in a few ways.

At home you gain experience, improve your credentials and upgrade your skills.
Far too many here just ride the gravy train until they hit the siding and then wonder where they, how they got off the main track are and what can they do to get off the siding and back running again.

If you continue to improve your credentials and skills there are upward mobility options (in and out of Korea) and career choices to consider.

Teachers never get rich. Better get a job in boutique banking if that is your goal.

If you want a long term, reasonably stable industry (region wide) then EFL and teaching in general isn't bad.

Move from entry level EFL to university jobs (not always a profitable move and there certainly is a glass ceiling).

Move from entry level EFL to DOS positions (DELTA anyone).
Move into teacher training. (DELTA / DipT).

Move into working with publishers like Oxford, Cambridge, Pearson, etc.
(options vary from writing to editing, teacher training and workshop presenters).
Move from EFL to primary/secondary teaching then move farther up into admin positions.
Make some connections and move into consulting for or with the government or various other firms.

Return home and get teacher certified, become a corporate trainer, if you are entrepreneurial then open a language school for foreign students or recent immigrants.

EFL as a gap year or two is what it is.

If you want to go further then it will take some work but options and mobility do exist.

The good news is that, as long as you are willing to follow the money, there are always decent jobs to be had with the ability to live well, save for the future and enjoy your work.



Yes I'd also add the area of exams which I know one or two people doing quite well in. They got into examining then examiner training, then working for Cambridge exams in the UK/travelling around etc..
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